(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the State Board of Library Commissioners of Michigan"

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



D,„„.db, Google 



► 



THE OIFT OP 



■ Dig,, z.d by Google 



2 
.MS 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.di, Google 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS 



MICHIGAN 



1900 



'"'"i?^le 



D,„„.db, Google 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 

Lansinq, January 31, 1900. 
To H0NOBA.BLE Hazen S. Pikgree, 

Oovernor of Michigan. 
Sib — In compliance with section 3, Act No. 115, Pablic Acta of 1899, I 
have the honor to submit the first aDnaal report of the State Board of Library 
CommiBsioners. Very respectfully, 

Cyrus G. Luce, 
President. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT. 



The first meeting of the State Board of Library CommisBioDers was hold ia 
the Public Library at Detroit, NoTember 23, 1899. The following members 
were present : 

Ei-Governor CyruB G. Lace, 

Mr. Peter White, 

Mr. Henry Nelson Loud, 

Mr. John M. C. Smith, 

Mrs. Mary C. Spencer. 

At the meeting there was a general discussion of library methods and the 
following plan formulated as preliminary : The secretary was instrncted to ad- 
dress letters to the mayors, Buperintendents of schools or other public officials 
of cities and villages aeking for the names of people who would be interested 
in the establishment of libraries in their localities. The individuals so se- 
lected to be written to in behalf of library work. 

The secretary was also instructed to prepare a set of questions to be sent 
with the last named letter to each of these persons. It was also decided to 
send circulars to all libraries already established asking for a report and call- 
ing their attention to Sec. 3, Act No. 115, which makes this duty obligatory 
upon all incorporated libraries. 

Acting upon the instructions of the Board in the month of November about 
300 circular letters were sent to superintendents of schools in cities and vil- 
lages, and upon receipt of replies with liste of names, nearly 3,000 letters 
witb qnestions enclosed were mailed. These letters covered all towns and 
villages of more than 700 inhabitants, and many replies have been 
received. The statistics, which were included in these replies, have been teb- 
ulated and may be found in this report. 

From the large nnmber of letters which have been received by the secretary 
bearing upon the library conditions of these towns and vilifies, certain parts 
have been selected which bear more closely upon the subject, and are also in- 
cluded in the report. 

The second meeting of the Board was held in Lansing, January 4, 1900. 
At that meeting the reports which had been received were carefully examined 
and a general discussion of methods followed. 

The secretary at that time was instrncted to prepare a third circular, 2,000 
of which were to be printed and mailed to all towns and villages where ad- 
dresses had been furnished. Accompanying these circulars were copies of the 
law anthorizing cities, villages and townshipa to establish free public libraries 
and reading rooms. To this circular many letters have been re- 
ceived by the secretary, covering almost every point in library work and 
requiring an answer of two to three pages. These letters have been answered 
and the recipients-have expressed their satisfaction with the information which 
they have received. 

Throngh the kindness of the United States Commissioner of Education the 
secretary has been permitted to embody in this report tables showing the number 
of libraries in Michigan. 

The Board wishes to state in conclusion that the various circulars which 
have been sent out have demonstrated the fact that there is a healthy interest 
in libraries in nearly all the localities where the establishment of one is possi- 
ble. It is the earnest desire of the Board to increase this interest. Cor- 
respondence on library matters is respectfully requested, and information and 
■ all details will be most gladly and cheerfully given. 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

' PBELIMIMART WORK OF THE BOARD OF FOBLIC I.IBBABK COMHISSIONERS. 

(1) 

December 11, 1899. 
Superintendent of Schools: 

Deab Sir — Yoa are undoubtedly aware that at the last sessioD of the leg- 
iBlatnre a State library commiBaion was eBtablished for the parpose of encoor- 
aging the establishment and efficiency of free public libraries in the State, 

At the first meeting of the Board, held ia Detroit, November 23, 1899, the 
secretary was instructed to address inflnential residents of towns and Tillages, 
in order to ascertain from them, if possible, the conditions with regard to 
libraries. The object which the Board has in view is to stimulate interest in 
libraries and to awaken a desire in the community for good reading, which 
will lead to the establishment of free pablic libraries. 

Will you kindly send upon the enclosed card the names of five or six influ- 
ential citizens of your place, both men and women, who you think would be 
interested in this work and with whom further correspondence can be carried 
on? 

You are earnestly requested by the Board to give this matter your immedi- 
ate consideration and to send the names at the earliest possible moment. An- 
other meeting of the Board will be held at the State Library December 36, 
and we wish to have replies from the individuals whose addresses you send, to 
us before that time. Very truly yours, 

Maby C. Spencer, 
Secretary. 



(2) 

Deab Sib — By act of the legislature of 1S99 there was created a State 
Board of Library Commissioners to encourage the establishment and efficiency 
of free public libraries. Sec. 2 of this act reads as follows : 

"It snail be the duty of the library commission to give advice and connBel 
to all free libraries in the State, and to all communities which may propose to 
establish them, as to the beat means of establishing and administering such 
libraries, the selection of books, catalogning and all other details of library 
management. In January of each year the Board shall make a report to the 
Governor of its doings, of which report one thousand copies shall be printed by 
the State Printer for the use of the Board." 

This Board having for its members the following repreBentatiTe citizens of 
Michigan: Ex-Governor Cyrus G. Luce, president; Mr. Peter White, Mr. Henry 
Nelson Load and Mr. John M. C. Smith, has organized under the law held 
the first meeting in Detroit, November 33. At that meeting the Secretary was 
instmcted to open correspondence with influential residents of cities and villages 
having no public libraries. The object of this action on the part of the Board 
was to awaken a desire for public libraries and to devise ways and means by 
which such libraries can be established and supported. The movement is in 
the interest of broader culture and of higher education and for the purpose of 
counteracting by the introduction of good books the dangerous influence of 
much of theliterature which is flooding the State. 

I enclose herewith a series of questions, which have been carefully prepared 
by tbe Board, and to which we would like concise and positive answers. 

The State Librarian wishes to say that she will endeavor to make proTision 
for the admission into the State Library for a limited time, of meu and women, 
who may be appointed librarians of tlie libraries organized under this law. 
The instruction will be limited to a practical trainiing in the details of library 



REPORT OF BOARD OP PVBOO LIBRABT COMMISSIONERS. 7 

work. There will he no charges made for this taition; the only expense to the 
pnpUe will be their personal expenses. Farther information on this point 
mar be obtained by correspondence with this department. 

ft is eameatly requested that yon give this matter yonr immediate and per- 
sonal attention and that yonr replies will be forwarded to the State Library 
St Lansing at the earliest possible moment. 

You wilt notice a space at the foot of the sheet for remarks. Please give ns 
in this space yonr own opinion as to the conditions which prevail in yonr town 
and the chances as to the success of the movement. 

Very truly yours. 
Mart C. Spenc^, 
Secretary. 

At a meeting of the State Board of Library CommissioDers 
held January 4, 1900, the Secretary was instructed to prepare the 
following circnlar: 

The sole pnrpose of the State Board of Library Commissioners is to aid peo- 
ple in the establishment and maintonance of free public libraries. It is uni- 
versally acknowledged that the free public library system is the ideal one. By 
giving the edncational advantages of the libraries to people regardless of age 
or station we are fulfilling more nearly the conditions of true democracy than 
in any other way. The Board has no desire to interfere with school, ladies' or 
literary society libraries, but we believe that the best and most permanent suc- 
cess ia achieved by the free public library system as above mentioned. We 
therefore earnestly nrge npon yonr consideration the following suggestions: 

The first stop in the organization of a free public library is to provide for 
the purchase of hooks and the payment of running expenses of the library. It 
is surprising, however, how much can be done with a little money if it is ju- 
diciously and carefullv expended; especially that portion which is used for the 
finrchase of books. An immense amount of money is wasted every year in 
ibrariee becanse the purchasing agent is not familiar enough with literature 
to know what to buy. It has also to be remembered that librariee are for the 
betterment of the community in which they are placed and not to cater to 
oftentime depraved taste for fiction. 

It has been proven beyond denial by experienced librarians that with a care- 
ful selection of books and a librarian who is interested in the work readers can 
gradually be led from the use of fiction alone to that of travels, biography and 
history. 

The most equitable way te raise money neoessary for the esteblishment of 
free public libraries is by texation, aided perhaps, by the voluntary contribu- 
■ tions of the generous. A certain amonnt of fines is noder the Constitution 
paid to libranee (see Constitntiou Act 13 Sec. 12) and provisions may be made 
for the use of this mooey to help in aid of every free public library. The in- 
tent of the law is that this money should be used for books and should not 
be under any circnmstences diverted from the original object. 

While there is no provision in the law which allows financial aid by the 
State for free public libraries, the desire of the State Board of Library Com- 
tnisBiouers is to aid towns and villages desiring free public libraries in the fol- 
lowing ways: 

1. — By furnishing lists of books selected with the greatest care and of the 
highest literary character, and securing, if desired by the purchasers, the high- 
est possible discount on the purchases. 



i,>L.oog[e 



8 REPOBT OF BOABD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY OOMMISSIONBIBS. 

2. — By giving advice as to the classiScstioii, catalogaJDg and arrangemeDt 
of books on the shelves; in fact, famiBhing information in all the details of 
library economy. 

3. — The State Librarian will provide for admission into the State Library, 
for a limited time, of men and women who may be appointed librarians of the 
free pnblic libraries. The instruction will be limited to the practical training 
and the elementary details of library work. There will be no charges made 
for this tuition; the only expense will be that of a personal character. 

4. — Pnblio free and incorporated libraries ^ill be furnished by the State 
with a Talnable set of books called "the Pioneer and Historical Society collec- 
tions ^ Michigan." This set now nnmbera 37 volnmee and is of great histor- 
ical valne. 

5. — All free pablic libraries having 1,000 books other than State and Gov- 
ernment docnments may become associate with the State Library. Through 
this connection all State documents will be sent directly to the pnblic libra- 
ries, special pains being taken by the State Library to keep these sets as com- 
plete as possible. Associate libraries may also borrow from the State Library, 
Dooks, wnich their patrons may wish to use for a limited time. This opens to 
the smaller libraries of the State a wealth of material, which will prove of the 
greatest assistance to students who may live near the associate libraries. 

We enclose herewith a copy of Act 164 of the laws of 1877 entitled " An 
Act to authorize cities, corporated villages and townships to establish and 
maintain free pnblic libraries and reading rooms." 

You are respectfully urged to read this law carefolly, as it gives in detail 
foil instructions as to the organization and maintenance of a free public 
library, 

You are invited to acknowledge receipt of this letter and to express yoor 
views as to the prospect with • regard l» the establishment of a free pablic 
library in your town. Very trnly yours. 

State Board of Library Commissioners. 

Ex-Gov. Cybus G. LdCE, Coldwater, President. 

Mb. Petek White, Marquette, 

Mr. Henry Nelson Loud, Au Sable. 

Mr. John M. C. Smith, Charlolle. 

Mrs. M. C. SpeNceS, Laneio^, Secretary. 



Questions sent to cities and villages of more than 700 inhab- 
itants by Board of Public Library Commissioners, from which 
statistics printed in this bulletin were compiled : 

Is there a library in your city? 

If so, is it a free library, a public school library, an endowed library or an 
association library? 

Is it supported by taxation, or fees, or donations? 

What is its governing board and how appointed?.. 

Has it a building of its own, or is it in rented rooms?. 

Is it open every day? fiow many hours? 

How many volnmee does it contain? 

Do the books circulate in the homes? 

Does the librarian give her whole time and is she paid an annnal salary?.. . 



BEFOKT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COUUISSIONBRS. 9 

la the librarj, in your opinion, doing as good vork for the people aa it 

onght, or do yoD think it might be improved? 

In what way?. 

If there is no free library in yonr city, do yon think one conld be atartedP 

If ao, do you think anamber of inflnential people conld be indnced to take 
hold of the matter? 



The State Library GommiBsion is prepared to give all necessary advice and 
encoar&gement in sach cases. 

Please add any remarks upon this subject which yon may desire. 



(Bemarks:) 



Act 164, Public Acts 1877, entitled, An Act to Authorize Cities, 
Incorporated Villages, and Townships to Estahlish and Main- 
tain Free Puhlic Libraries and Reading Rooms. 

Section 1. The People of the State of Michigan enact. That the city coun- 
cil of each iocorporated city shall have power to establish and maintain a 
public library and reading room, for the use and benefit of the inhabitants of 
such city, and may levy a tax of not to exceed one mill on the dollar annually 
on all taxable property in the city, such tax to be levied and collected in like 
manner with other general taxes of said city, and to be known as the "library 
fund." 

Sec. 3. When any city council shall have decided to establish and main- 
tain a pnblic library and. reading room under this act, the mayor of such city 
shall, with the approval of the city council proceed to appoint a board of nine 
directors for the same, chosen from the citizens at large, with reference to 
their fitness for such office, and not more than one member of the city coun- 
cil shall be at any one time a member of said board. 

Sec. 3. Said directors shall hold office, one-third for one year, one-third for 
two years, and one-third for three years, from the date of their appointment, 
and at their first regular meeting shall cast lota for the respective terms, and 
annually thereafter the mayor shall appoint, as before, three directors, to take 
the place of the retiring directors, wno shall hold office for three years and 
nntil their successors are appointed. The mayor may, by and with the con- 
seat of the city council, remove any director for misconduct or neglect of 
duty. 

^c. 4. Vacancies in the board of directors occasioned by removals, resig- 
nation or otherwise, shall be reported to the city council, and be filled in like 
manner as original appointments, and no director shall receive compensation 
as such. 

Sec. 5. Said directors shall, immediatly after appointment, meet and or- 
ganize, by the election of one of their number president, and by the election 



10 REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSEONERS. 

of BQch other officere as they may deem neceas&ry. Thej shall make and 
adopt snch by-laws, rales and regaiations for their own guidance and for the 
government of the library and reading room, as may be expedient, not incon- 
sistent with this act. Tbey shall have esclnsive control of the expenditure 
of all moneys collected to the credit of the library fund, and of the constmc- 
tion of any library building, and of the supervision, care, and cnstody of the 
grounds, rooms, or buildings constructed, leased or set apart for that pur- 
pose: Provided, That all moneys received for such library shall be deposited 
in the treasury of said city to the credit of the library fund, and shall be kept 
separate and apart from other moneys of such city, and drawn upon by the 

firoper officers of said city, upon the properly authenticstod voncners of the 
ibrary board. Said boari^ shall have power to purchase or lease grounds, to 
occupy, lease, or erect an appropriate building or buildings for the use of said 
library ; shall have power to appoint a saitable librarian and neoessary assist- 
ants, and fix their compensation ; and shall also have power, to remove such 
appointees; and shall, in general, carry out the spirit and intent of this act in 
estoblishing and maintaining a public library and reading room. 

Sec. 6. Every library and reading room established under this act shall be 
forever free to the use of the inhabitants where located, always sabject to such 
reasonable mlcs and regulations aa the library board may adopt; and said 
board may exclude from the nse of said library and reading room any and all 
persons who shall wilfally violate such rules. 

Sec. 7. The said board of directors shall make, at the end of each and 
every year from and after the organization of snch library, a report to the city 
council, stating the condition of their trust at the date of such report, the 
various sums of money received from the library fund and from other sources, 
and how much moneys have been expended, and for what purposes ; the num- 
ber of books and periodicals on hand ; the nnmber added by purchase, gift or 
otherwise during the year ; the nnmber lost or missing ; the number of visitors 
attending; the nnmber of books loaned out, and the general character and 
kind of such books, with such other statistics, information and snggestions as 
they may deem ot general interest. All such portions of said report as relate 
to the receipt and expenditure of money, as well as the nnmber of books on 
hand, books lost or missing, and books purchased, shall be verified by affi- 
davit. 

Sec. 8. The city conncil of said city shall have power to pass ordinances 
imposing suitable penalties for the punishment of persons committing injury 
upon such library, or the grounds or other property thereof, or for wilful in- 
jury to or failure to return any book belonging to snch library. 

Sec. 9. Any person desiring to make donations of money, personal pro- 
perty, or real estate for the benefit of snch library, shall have the right to 
vest the title to (^the) money or real estate so donated in the board of directors 
created under this act, to be held and controlled by such board, when accepted, 
according to the terms of the deed, gift, devise or bequest of snch property; 
and as to such property, the said board shall be held and considered to he 
special trustees. 

Sec. 10. When fifty voters of any incorporated village or township shall 
present a petition to the clerk of the village, or township, asking that a tax 
may be levied for the establishment of a free public library, in such village, 
or township, and shall specify in their petition the rate of taxation, not to 
exceed one mill on the dollar, such clerk shall, in the next le^l notice of the 
regnlar annual election in such village or township, give notice that at such 
election every voter may vote " for a mill tax for a free public library," or, 
"against a mill tax for a free public library," specifying in such notice the 
rate of ta:^tiou mentioned in snch petition; and if the majority of all the 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. U 

Totee cast in encb village or township shall be for the tax for a free public 
library, the tax specified in sach notice Bhall be levied and collected in like 
manner with other general taxes of said village or towoahip, and shall be 
known as the "library fund;" and when such free pnblic library shall have 
been established, and a board of directors elected ana qnali&ed, as hereinafter 

Srovided, it shall be the duty of such board of directors, on or before the first 
[oaday of September in each year, to prepare an estimate of the amonnt of 
money neceeaarj for the support and maintenance of such library for the 
eosning year, not exceeding one mill on the dollar of the taxable property of 
finch village or township, and report soch estimate to the assessor of such 
village, or the supervisors of such township, for assessment and collection, 
the same as other village or township taxes, alid the same shall be so assessed 
and collected; and the corporate antborities of any such villages or townships 
ma; exercise the same powers conferred npon the corporate antborities of 
cities under this act. 

Sec. 11. At the next regnlar election after any village, or township shall 
hare voted to establish a free public library, there shall be elected a library 
board of six directors — one-third for one year, one-third for two years, and 
one-third for three years; and annually thereafter there shall be elected two 
directors, who shall hold their office for three years, and until their snccessors 
are elected and qualified; which board shall have the same powers as are by 
this act conferred npon the board of directors of free public libraries in 
cities. 

Sec. 13. This act shall not apply to cities or villages containing a popula- 
tion of over ten thousand, or to any city or village maintaining a public 
library under any special act. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



12 



REPORT OS' BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBBARY COMMISSIONERS. 



BTATIBTIC8 OF I.IBRA- 

The following tables have been taken from the report for 1896 of the United 
Public, ■oolatjr and school llbrailoB in Mlcbi- 



II 



. PabUo Sctao^ Ubrai?.. 



. Albion ColleKS... 

. LadlcB' Library AeaoolaUoo 

. AUegaa Townabip Ubnrj 

"—a CoUoge 

Uc School Library 

Publlo Library 

. Lftdles' Library AsBooIatimi 

St. Thomas' Catholic Library 

School District Library -.... 

Tappao PreabyterlaD Association, 
McMUlan HaU 

Onlrerslty of Michigan.. . 
~- " "a- Christian ' 
■ nollege 

_ t, Llti . 

. Public School Library. 

. Public IJbrary. 

. Bellevoe Township Library... 
. Benton Harbor College 



. Buobanan Tonnshlp Library... 

. High SohooL 

Public Library 

. Library Association. 



Ladles' Library Association... 

Public Library. 

"'— '" ■~-bllc Ubrary 

" il Library... 



. Public School LIbrai 

. Detroit Bar Library Assoolatlon., 
. Detroit College, StudeoW IJbrai 
nit Home and Day Sohml. .. 



Publlo Ubrary 

BOTlogwella School Dtatrict Library, 

. Y. m! cV A.'uiwBryi'RBiiroBd'*De- 
partmenb 

Young Hen's Sodality o[ St. Jos- 
eph's Church 

Ladles' Library AsuoolatloD 

Publlo Library 

High School 

' es' Library ABsoolatlon 






187^ aen... 



'. Sah.'.'. 



REPORT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



13 



BIBS IM MICHIGAN. 

States GommiBsioner of Gdncation with the permisaion ot that officer: 
gmn of 1,000 volmnM and ov«r in 1896. 









i 

1 




5^i 
1-^ 




1 




1 


1, 




Name ol Ubrarlan. 


• 


10 


11 


IS 


13 


14 


IS 


16 


11 


18 






1.EU 


100 
















S»,010 






11,000 




UarKwei. P. Jewea 








l:Sg 




1.011 

n 


as 








2.000 














B. S. Taylor 


■'wb 


S:SSS 






s 

la 

211 
000 


"•i^oiio 


10.1X0 


nt 


'i-i 


100 


1^ 


:::''■ 


■isb 

000 


LlzBbeth B. Uase. 
Balpb C. Elj. 

BDilly S. Oliver. 


s.iei 


zu 


4TI 










S3i.VtSS; 




17,M1 

100 

i.too 

' "'iio 
i.m 


IM 

no 

0,471 

7( 
TO* 

J7» 
100 

to 

2M 




18,» 






400 






S.741 

m,xa 




Mb C. Flnnej. 
SaymoDd C. Davla. 


004 


•,4« 




la 


80,000 

"iojooo 


f-SK 


100 
" 870 

■■"a 

138 








A. W. KeUey. A. M., Ph. D., M- D. 


1,000 
41,770 

1:a 










m 


























OlpiLl. 




an 






Esse Osgood. 




100 

too 


HO 








225 




'"Sin 


■■*i66 


4.000 


100 


100 




W. P. Ruaaer. 

Geo. H. Calton. supertntendent. 


l-s 








200 


NX) 






retBTJ. 


















't-S 




3,UH 
IM 

10 


ioo 


1.600 


m 


l.«72 


1.14B 
100 




^"^"ggcsrr^"""""- 
























WO 






12 




Mrs. F, J. KemphrleB, S. J. 




























a 


at 


































«o 


it.m 


at 


siH.toe 










ue.MO 
i.tco 


W7.m 


4a.iias 


40,102 




efSSEr"" ■■'"•"•■ 








M3 

E.OSI 
K.OOO 










J. G. JenUna. K. R Secrewry. 














» 








GE 












£80 


.-.*^ 




l-Si 




M 

















L.L..,.L.UOQlC - 



BBPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, sociaty, uid Bcbool libiail«B In UloUgan 





Nwne of Ubrwy. 


1 

is 


Ctasa. 


o 


li 


it 


1° 


I 


a 


3 


4 


s 


6 


7 


s 




MloUganSobooirorUieDeBt. 


1873 






C. 
T. 

1 

C. 

g- 

T.' 
C. 

d 

§: 
1 

T. 

T. 

C. 


? 
















Oeu 


R. 














1873 

1 

isri 






F. 

!;■ 

F. 
F. 
















ifflasSi^ii^ii-.::::::;; 












R. 
































leM 






B. 


















1»7I 

IIS 


sr 


R 


F. 
S. 






OravcB' tJbrarr of Hope College. . . . 

HDllwid Township LIbraiT 














Sf 


R 














188S 






F. 
F. 

B. 
S. 

"f.' 
Fr. 

"sV 
p 
















Stale House ol CotrectloQ and Re- 


ISIG 

isn 

1871 


Gen. 










Ionia 


ISf";: 




C. 

T. 
T. 

i 

c. 
c. 

T. 






PubUo Sohool"Lii™ry 








Ironwood 




IB88 






















ge?- 


B. 
























'S 

IBID 

ins 

I8J7 




a 


8. 

P. 
F. 






















O. 






Mlehlgan Female SemiDary. 

Public Library. 






Gen. 


a 


J. 










Si,"""- 










1881 
IBS 

1W>7 

•s 




?: 


Ft. 
F. 

f: 

F. 

P. 
F. 

F. 

sV 

F. 
F. 
P. 
F. 


































School Ubrary. Dlatilat No. 1 




B. 


T. 

S: 
1 

1 




















School Ubisry, DlBlilot No. 1 


Sob. 


R. 
O. 
















Ladlea- library Anocloclon 


isn 

1884 

1871 






Scb 

Gen 

Oen 


g-. 






HendoD Township FVee Publlo 
























•s 


S:::::: 


R 

















i=,L.ooglc 



REPOBT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
of 1,000 TolamoB and orer in 1896. — Continued. 



4.W1 


2W 


a 




11.07 






130 




F. D. CUrko. 






M 










M 




Mis. B. el Nyo. 














m 
"em 






H.M9 

386 




tsoo 


I.3S 








150 


m 




!:ffi 












.";- 






'•S 


ISO 


IK.BIK 




1.130 




H. Z. Brook. 


e.i« 


4,000 


DO 


7B 


B,600 


8.000 




soo 


88,000 


John H. Wolfe. 




■ilow 


'H 








« 


24t 








lOi) 








}-!?S 


I.WS 




36 


^uTu Aite^""^'"- 
















100 


!0 


M 


300 


»66 


















a Uarttarel Sauce. 


\'^ 




















BOO 

no 


BOO 
■Mt 

xe 

'■S 


EOD 

100 

"ioo 








160 

SOO 
000 




T. W. Paeon. 




a,soo 
4.M0 

8.58t 

8t;m 


at 




..«. 




»0 


erne Mace. 








•ffl 


























an 

1.087 

i^boo 


a 

!0 


-si 


i,a» 






1 

!.O0< 














■^ 










^ 


















■■""71 


l|tOI 


2U 


'*'ot 










|||3,s?s-r' 




■■i.«i 


i 


«^ 


48 






386 










sc 


"ico 

46 




« 


MO 


MOO 




Mrs. A. F. C»aj. 

Henrj B. Baker, aecretary. 

Mra L. R. RobUuon. 


?-5 




uo 

w 

442 

ISO 

8.8ST 






IGO 

«» 

7» 


■■'fflo 












?'Si 


11, gu 


2.887 






iib 


100 
83 

80 
M 

eii 


""iib 


ISO 

8.000 






£01 

MB 

'2 






1.W 


l.OJO 

" " "266 


1,000 




Qennide B. SmIUi. 

Ura. C. A. CaUdna. 
Jas. H. WalMn. 




4,700 




Mm A. E. Varfiey. 



















i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIO LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Public, aoolfltT, KDd scliool libraifes In Mlchlgaii 



Nune ot llbrtr;. 



N«g&unee 

Nlles. 

North Detroit. 

NorthvUle. 

Ohvei. .'."'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'-'.'.'. 

OllTBl 

Opechee.i'. 

Orobnnt Lake. 

Peatwater 

PecoBke;. 

Petoaker. 

nalDweU. 

Plymouth 

PODtlac 

Pontiac 

PoDtlno 

POTt BuroD 

Port Huron 

BepabUo 

Sa«leaif. East Side. . 
SKlnaw Eoat. Side . . . 

Saitlaaw. Weat Side . 
Sagloaw. West Side . 

Ba«lnaw, West Side . 

St. Clmlr. 

St JohUB 

Si. Joseph 

Sault Ste. Hwle 

Slorgls 

Teeumseb. 

Three Rivers 

Trarerse Cltj. 

West Ba; City. 

West B» City. 

WUtebSi 

Wyandotte 

YpaUauiI 

YpallaDtl 

Ypsllanll 



Library... 

y Public 1 



HamtTamok Toviuhip Library... 
Ladles' Library AHSOolatlOa 



Sehool Library. . . 

tflcblgaji Hilltary Aokdemy 

Wood's Beadlnc Room 

Ladles' Library Assoolatloa 

Ladlea' Library and Literary A 



Pnbllo School Library 

Pentwater Township Library. . . 



Eaatern Mlohlgan Asylum. . . 

High SchooL 

Ladles' Library A 



St. Clair County Bar Library... 

Township Ubrary. 

HaU Memorial Library 

Hoyt Publlo Library 



1873 Oeu..., 
ISM Sob.... 

inea aoh.... 



Teutonla Library 

Ladles' Library 

Ladles' Library Assoeladon. 



Publlo Library... 



Ladles' Library 

High School 

Sace Public Library 

Township Library 

Publlo Library 

Ladles' Library 

PubUo Sobool Llbran... 
State Normal School... 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBI^IC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS, 
of 1,000 volumes and over In 1896.— CoiUinucti. 





Di 


h 


8 

4 


Isi 

it! 


11 
Si 

ill 


HeoBlpW. 


1* 

Is 




! 


!s 




Name ot librarian. 


» 


10 


11 


IS 


18 


14 


IS 


i« 


n 


IS 


11 


*""bo6 


lOD 


""a 


tB.TM 

flo.Hr 

S;Soo 




KOO 
«K 

no 

100 


MMO 

tot 

»7 

m 


'iii'.im 




ton) 


100 




..« 














CteUoD. 


s.ooo 




■■s 










i,n« 
in 


15,000 


Josepb U Daolols. 




















■?-S!l 








H» 












N) 
SO 

in 


■s 






HO 

m 

140 


I.GOO 






u 


i.ooo 


M» 




Mi* 8. D. Haini' *" 


too 


1W 


































1-S 




1,TO7 


i.m 




'•S8 


:::::::; 


n.'ISS£,!?, """"'' 




MO 

MO 

ia 


i| 

IS 

so 






8.000 




J. E. Laphun. 




























1.401 


B.OOO 






re 


1S.U0 


400 


i.in 


Anna A. ManwariaK. 




a 








100 


;| 










l,13» 




E.HM 

mIooo 




t!:!S 




■i:i* 


s 


«,8» 




8.1» 

1:1 
i 

4.818 
t.«CO 




m 




*■» 


1.300 




«, 




















1.000 


lio 

s 

100 


M 
40 


S,BT1 






lOff 


900 








Geo W Loomla. 


1.BO0 


!'i 


Joaima Kemp. 




17,907 






Qenrude J, Huey. 

K B. liDKler, president of board. 










tm 
m 

s»« 


3.001 

i.on 


IIO 


1;S 


8.40e 
BO 


aoa 


'iR 

43! 










Hn. Helen D. Hedgee. 




"■■■» 








•e.ooi 


100 















D,„„.db, Google 



18 REPORT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBBABT COMMIBSIONERS. 



Associate 

(OrgBDlied under Act £8, 



FLACR 


Kind. 


iBoome. 


TOl- 




CoUe e 








BohooldlMTlot...!!!! 

KBS-r;:::;-.:::: 
































S<HU> nnhlln 


T CI 








K^"^.^'fcn 






Ztr^E: 












as; SKI:,:::::: 

CoUeKeotHlnn 


















Julooii 


One*»Jt mill t« 














iiffi?«EE 




















One mtn tu 




















EDdowment 






























L.I^An'n. peltate.. 
Free public 



























D,„„.db, Google 



BEFORT OP BOABD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONBR8. 



SdSi^S'Z? 

year.fr. 


Tolumea 
for home 




Kind of oaM- 




»™„..^. 


Jan. m Ltia 










E T Arann 






SM 










IS. 817 




I§X??^.^:: 


Nellie 8. LOTlnB- 


!&■%,*&:■: 






1.818 












41 


'm.m 




Bobool board 

appointed by 








S'™M.utor'-- 


apA^im!::::: 












»iiS 










i.8ie 






Al>riI,-«a,7B 


8i.§gB 

8.M 
I4.SS7 

IE. 000 






s^ISS 






SS:.-!!^'^:.:::: 


B-dofdlreeton.-.. 

from faculty 








AbbyP.Cadj. 
UUlan F. Brownrlcg. 


""9.m 






H^j'afcuo 




K« C A CalktoB 


4.H1 
CMS 

ixtm 




A. E. Yanlley. 






Julia 8. Wood. 






Jos. L. Daniels. 




«.in 

,,,12 




Printed 

Card and ptd.hla. 

catalogue 


Eiocutlye board... 
library commlHl'n 
Board of dlreococii 










Nayn-ssjo .... 

AprH-BBTiK 




SS^WA""""- 

























D,„„.db, Google 



RBPOBT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBBABY COMMISSION BBS. 

Association 



PLACa 


■.o». 


O-'norren. 






Own 




DonatioD 

Fees. 
















Fees 






Fees or public money 








OroenTille 


Fees . . . 




















Own 










Fees 


























































Swter.':.";;::":::": ■ 











































D,„„.ab,Goo'^le 



HEPOET OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Libraries. 

eraed by prlTsCe usoclatlons.) 



»„„„ 


ToluinCM. 


drouUting 


Nuns of UbrmriMi. 




2,000 

250 

• 250 

500 


Circulating 


Mrs. Kate Alger. 






Circulating 
Circulating 

Clrculatiog 














500-1,200 
25-50 


Mrs. L. Paygon. 






Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 






700 










3,000 

250 

500-1,000 

500 

4,000 


May Conger. 




SaU P. M.. 






MlM E. High. 




Circulating 










Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 

Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 






200 

1,600 

300 

3,000 
200 

3,000 
750 






Mrs. Laura Chipman. 










Mrs. M.Segur. 














300 
781 






Circulating 

















D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PDBLIO LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



PLACE 


'tnoome. 


Own or rent. 




TaxaUon 


School Bldg. 


























DonaUoDB 










Pees . 










Marquette {Peter While) 


















Ptoea 


City Hall... 











































D,„„.db, Google 



RBPOBT OF BOABD OF PUBLIC LIBBABy COMM18SIONEB8. 

Libraries. 



Hoonopea. 


.SSbSi 


Rerarenoe. 


Name of UbrarJUL 


Slioursdidly 


3,419 
400 


Circulating 


Uise Emily Oliver. 
Mr. Green. 


DaUy 1-9 P. M. and Sun. 4-6. . 




3,000 
, 800 

900 
200 


Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 
CirculaUng 
Circulating 
CirculaUng 










Wm. H. Byroad. 






10orl2 iira-daily 


iso 
i2,m 




» A. M.-9 P. M. daUy <a. Sun. 


Rose E. Pdtenaude. 




460 

850 

24,000 


Circulating 
Circulating 


Sophia B. Brown. 
C. M. Kay. 


Sat. P.M 

»A.M.-5P.M.,7P.M »OK.Sun. 






Mrs. Houghton. 
Joo. Streetzer. 


Daily 

2 A. M.-9 P. M. week days. . . 
6 iira. onTuea., Tliur. and Sat. 
Saturday 


500 
8.000 
2,200 

ilaos 

■ 


Circulating 


Circulating 

Circulating 


MUs C. HoldBworth. 
Mrs. E. B. Hodges. 





D,„„.db,Coogle 



REPORT OF HOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

PnbUc School 



PLACE. 


Ineoma. 


Own or rent 




























Fines. 


School 








BirmlDg^h&m 




















School 






























School 






























School 










































School 










































High school. 










High 8.h00l. 

Rent 






















School 




Ta;»tlon 








High achool. 

























=,Cooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Libraries. 



Ho.„^. 


KiUDber of 




»»,«,„»„„, 








Roy Gilbert 




400 

100 
2S0 
224 

1,200 

2,000 


Clr. among 

pupils. . 

Reference. 




Inez O. Peasley. 




A. F. Doyle. 








Closed, no 
Circulating 




4i hours Saturday P. M 


A. W. Bennett. 
Amelia Loch. 




1,135 

300-400 

1,000 


Circulating 

Circulating 










N. H. Hayden. 














i25 

500 


Circulating 


Principal of school. 






Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 

Circulating 












1,000 

400-600 

600 

1,500 


MtasJ.SlyBeld. 




BA. M.-4 P.M. school days.. 


W. C. Weslland. 












Friday P. M. 




Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 

CirculatinK 


E. L.WrightorDr.Scailow. 
Superintendent of schools. 

A. P. Cook. 
Miss A. Lee. 






2 hrs. Tuesdays and Fridays. 
School hours 


1,600 
150 

250 

3,000 

678 

1,400-1,600 

4,000 

200-800 

1,100 


Saturdays 2-3:30 P. M 


Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 


Kate S. Hutching. 
George F. Manning. 

Edith Fuller. 


1 to 4 P. M. school days 




















200 

3,000 

401 

300 

1,500 

1,000 

1,186 
200 
500 

3.000 


Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circu latins 

Circulating 
Circulating 
Relerence. 
Circulating 
Circulating 






Miss M. Meyer. 






V. G. Mays. 




R Boughton, Jr. 

Elizabeth Hixson. 
Emma Parmelee. 
Principal La Salle. 


2 days week 2-5, 7-B P. M. . . . 
8 hrs. daily except Saturdays 
School hours 


Friday P. .\l 


Isabella C. Pyfe. 



i=,L.ooglc 



RBPOBT OP BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COHMI8SIONBRS. 

Pablic School 



PLACE. 


...... 


o..„„.. 








































Monej voted 
DoD&tioDB, ap 






Vaeear. . . 












WUllamBton . / 








Ubrary fund 













Township 



PLACE, 


laooma. 


OwnorrenL 
































Erao 




School ..... 










Appropriation by town board 














Mackinaw Island 


Taxation 


Town hall... 










































































T&ree Oaks.. :::::::::::;:::::::: 































i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OP BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 27 
Libraries.— Omtmued. 



Bonis opCD. 


NanbeTor 
Tolumm. 




Nune of UbnilBD. 


WednSBday P. M. afterschool 


360-400 


Circulating 
Circulating 














2,800 

2:200 

100 

437 
■ 600 


Circulating 


MM. J. G. Huey. 










Circulating 
Circulating 


Principal. 
SuperiDtendenL 






BA. M.-4P. M 


340 
275 








Circulating 


J. Q. Roode. 





Hoanap«n. 


N0.01 
TOlumea. 


retereoce. 


Nune of Ubrarfui. 




20 

200 

1,480 

2,000 








RetercDce. 

Circulating 
Clrculattnj 

Circulating 








10 hrs 






Townahip clerk. 




500 




Circulating 
Circulallnj 
Circulating 




sSI^!?! ;::;::::::::;:: 


400 
300-800 


Mra. Wm. O'Reilly. 


1 hr. Pri 






aoeed. .'..... 


100 
800 
600-1,000 
100 
400 

720 

.500 

500-2,000 

1.100 

400 


Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 


Mr. Chapman. 














Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 

Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 
Circulating 


H. L. Hitzler. 






Sat. P. M .... 






W. E. Hodgea. 






Mary Woodruff. 








A. B. Way. 
L. M, Kay. 








1,500 




Kittle Voabuiv. 






Sat. P. M 


300 


G. J. Kansler. 







i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COUUISSIONERS. 
Towns R«portlng as Having No Ubrailoa. 



Armada. 
Ashley. 

Benton Harbor. 
Clinton. 
Deerfield. 

Dollar ville. 



Luther. 
Morenci. 
We way go. 
Ontonagon. 
Ovid. 

Stand Isb. 

Vaasar. 

Williamston. 



Gaylord. 
Howard Ciiv. 



REPORTS FROM CITIEN AND TII.I.AGKS BATING ESTABLISHED LIBKARIES. 

ALGONAC. 

The township library consiats of about 200 volumes in a book case, which 
is always to be found at the home of the township clerk. There is practically 
no call for the books. The public school library is confined to the school en- 
tirely.— W. E. Boatwick, M. D. 

We have no free library except the school and school district library. — D. 
G,' Imes. 

ALMONT. 

I would be glad to know of the plan that is contemplated to start libraries 
and win be interested in one that is deemed feasible by our people. — Amelia 
E. Dickerson. 

AVe made an attempt twenty years ago which was a failare, the books were 
bonght, rooms secured aod opened and papers and periodicals provided. It 
was popular for a short time, but was finally closed for lack of patronage. 
Think one could be maintained in so small a place only by taxation of public. 
What are your plans ? — C. R. Fergnson. 

AU SABLE. 

If some of oar influential people could be interested I cannot see why we 
should not have a public library, if small, and I understand our good townsman 
H. N. Lond, has already started the movement. — Margaret Duncan. 

It would add very mncb to the general culture of this community if a 
library were located here. Very few Dooksof high grade go into the homes of 
a majority of the people. People are reading, but not standard literature. 
Several intelligent men and women will be glad to co-operate with the "Board 
of Library Commissioners,"— €. M, Jansky. 

BAD AXE. 

I am very glad the legislature of 1809 made this proWsion. I will do all I 
possibly can to aid the enterprise. We have a large nii.nber of people here 
who read and would no donbt aid the enterprise. — R. H. Qrandy. 

BELDING. 

We have practically no public library in onr city. About six years i^o a 
few citizens with the help of the Beldlng Bros., the stik mannfactarers,, started 
a public library, but itbnrned up soon after it was started. We have since had 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 29 

none. I have heard that Bellying Bros, have talked some of startiDg another 
library and farnishiDg a home for it. — H. J. Leonard. 

Yeare ago there need to he a free public librarv, bnt burned during fire. 
If the ladies here could be induced to form a Ladies' Library AsBOciation I 
think we codM miee $100 per year for a free public library. It is needed 
Tory much. How can we obtain books from the circulating library at 
Lansing? — A. L. Marrin. 



In connection with library is a free reading room, which is well patronized 
by yonog people. We have a good collection of books for a email library 
and are continaally adding to sama — Geo. h, Loope. 
BIG RAPIDS. 

Onr library at present is closed owing to a lack of funds. The books are 
much worn and should be rebound. We are waiting to accnmalate funds 
sufficient to put it in shape before opening it again. We are also waiting the 
ontcome of a law suit between the aeire of the estate of Harriet C. Paelps 
and the city of Big Kapids. Mrs, Fhelpa bequeathed house and money to 
found library and the will is contested. — No name. 

Our library was closed sometime ago on account of funds. Many of the 
Tolnmes were not in condition to circulate and we had no funds to replace or 
repair. With taxes of 4^ it is idle to ask people for money for library pur- 
poses. — A. W. Bennet. 

BIRMINGHAM. 

An open reading room with all desirable classes of literature would be vastly 
more desirable, bnt expense seems to preclude most of these things. — W. D. 
Clizbe. 

This association dates back some S5 years. Began by giving public entei- 
tainments to raise the necessary money. Strnj^gled along until they bad a 
fine building in the center of the village, but are some $2,000 in debt on their 
real estate. They have found it impossible to get the " men folks " inter- 
ested and the ladies do all. — E. L. Poppletou. 

Onr town is not now strong enough for free library. It is very hard work 
to support this one. — Miss M. Baldwin. 

BRIGHTON. 

The trustees can give yon more and better information than I. — Gr. S. 
Burgess. 

Our library is known as the "Russell Library," and was donated by tho 
late Hon. W. H. H. Russell by will. The books are somewhat old, but gen- 
erally a good selection. There have been a few other books donated. It would 
be of inestiniable benefit to the people of the village if this library was larger. 
There are many works of value printed by the United States government %at 
would be of great value to a library ; such for instance as the state papers of 
the diSerent presidents, etc. Also works on mound builders, cave dwellers, 
deep sea sounds, and I see no reason why your commissioners could not get 
these works. — B. T. 0. Clark, Trustee Russell Library. 
BRONSON. 

For the number of volumes we have, it is doing as good work as we ought 
to expect. — Warren Bough ton. 

The library you speak of might be placed in with the one that is now here. 
-James Swain. * Dignz.d.;^ LiOO^^lC 



30 REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

These answers were fDrniahed me bj the lihrsriao. I have been here bat & 
brief time, hence am not personally acquainted with the condition of the 
library, bnt believe the town has eome very desirable books. — M. P. Smith. 
BUCHANAN. 

I think a plan somewhat like the Parmelee cironlattng wonld work well, if 
backed by the state. — L. G. Avery. • 

CARSON CITY. 

I think the Ladies' Literary CInb wonld be mnch interested in a library. In 
fact the question has been before tbem for some time. — Urs. Jnlia Se^ons, 
President 

CA8S CITY. 

Oor library is managed by some ladies, but for some reason the idea prevails 
that it ie an arUtocratic affair. I have tried to have the township take bold of 
it and increase same with moneys appropriated by the state. Thns far I have 
failed. Should say that the ladies wonld be willing to tnrn over the library 
to the village or township. Don't know how the project might be made a 
snccess. Can yon give advice? — 0. Elump. 

CENTREVILLE. 

Majority present at town meeting afflicted with '• taxophobia " — " 25 cents 
for woodchncks ; not one cent for library. " Conntry residents patronize it a 
good deal, bat it happens to be the other class who get to town meeting. — 
B. M. Porter, M. D. 

Onr library ia an old township library located here and which has been at a 
standstill practically for years. I would be very desirons of seeing a special 
library board, either township or village, elected here and then see something 
done to bring onr library up to date. Gentlemen, will you kindly explain to 
me upon what conditions we might have opportunity to have section of the 
state circnlatiog' library sent bereP I understand that this can be done free 
of any large expense to ns. — C. 0. Sharp. 

CHELSEA. 

This is a free public library for Catholics and Protestants and all citizens. 
It is open only on Sunclays. Wish it coald be opened every day, and espec- 
ially in the evening, for the working classes. It is doing great good, and is 
under the control of St. Mary's church, — William P. Conaidine, Pastor. 

A library anch as I would advise would not be of interest to the general 
public and would not receive support or patronage. I think a library filled 
with fiction might find someone to take hold of it and make it a success, but 
I have something else to do. — W. W. Gifford. 

Our town is rather small to support a free library. However, if the poorer 
classes couid be induced to patronize it, it wonld be an excellent idea. — S. C. 
Stimson. 

CLARE. 

We intend to turn this library over to the city association, as it will pledge 
itself to give t50 or 9100 a year to its support, then make it free. — No name. 

There le a circulating library here owned or rather operated by a church 
auxiliary society, which does a good work among its raembers. — C. W. Perry. 

Association library and state traveling library will educate the people to the 
benefit and economy of a free public library. Anyone, on payment of $1.00, 
becomes member of library association, with all privileges. I find our school 



REPOBT OP BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARX COMMISSIONBRe. 81 
boards are too conserTative in permitting scbool libraries to circalate booka to 



a permitting 
loDinsoQ. 



e aaved, not need. — S. 0. Robi 

CONSTANTINE. 

Libntr; is not doing the work it shonld for thepeople. If more centrally 
located and open more often> would be better. — W. W. Harvey. 

It bein? a small town (1200), the cbancee are not favornble for such a 
library.— B. F. Qrenoble. ' 

COOPERSVILLE. 

The library has been nnder the control of the Bcbool board and received 
very little attention. — U. Dnrbam. 

DBARBORN. 

As there ia only a ecbool library in Dearborn and tbat conducted as snch 
libraries generally are, cannot say as to how any other might do. Would 
suggest yon might send to Mrs. Jacob Hall, president of the Ladies' Literary 
Clao here. She might take it in hand, etc. — £. L. Howe. 

DECATUR. 

The preeent system or association is altogether too exclnsiTe. Only those 
who are members of the association and paying the required fee are priv- 
il^ed to Qse the books. — Rev. Geo. B. Rogers. 

I am of the opinion that this project wonld meet with approval by the better 
class here. And I hope that something may be accomplished. — G. L." Rose, 
M. D. 

A free poblic library is a great advantage to any village and I wonld be glad 
to see one here. I do not know how the people would take bold of it. — F. H. 
Dewey. 

DUNDEE. 

My ideal in a village of this size is to make the school library valuable 
for reference, and famish a good class of reading for the pnblic under care 
and control of the school officers. — R. B. Davis. 

Send us any information that you may have in reference to bettering our 
library affairs and oblige. — Chas. E. Stanger.. 

EAST TAWAS. 
I should very much like a free public library in East Tawas. It is mncb 
needed and would be appreciated by many. — E. P. Thomas. 
ESCANABA. 

We believe that the necessary improvements can be made in this direction, 
and are takiugeteps to do so. There is opportunity for a great deal to be 
done. — R. D. Ewing, Superintendent of schools. 

FENTON. 

There are some ladies clubs here that use the State circulating libraries 
with good resnlts. Think there is also a school library in the high school. — 
Vi. B. Phillips. 

The above remarks api^ to the school library. I think tbat is the most 
deserving one in town, — Helen L. Wood. 



i,>L.ooglc 



8a REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

FLUSHING. 

This IB called the ladiea' library. For the past year or longer a library 
from LanBing has been circolating, members paying SO centa a year. When 
read the books are returned and replaced by new ones. Not many avail them- 
selvBB of it. If yon conld help in onr ladies' library we wonid appreciate it. 
1 wonId like to correepond farther with you regarding help for oar library. — 
0. W. Tock. 

FRANKFORT. 

Most of the books in this library were selected and purchased 35 or 30 years 
ago by a number of onr citizenB who constituted the "Frankfort Litttrary 
AsBociation." Afterwards a free circulating town library was organized and 
some volnmes accnmnlated. Two years ago both libraries were merged into 
the Frankfort public school library as above stated. Another year we shall 
raise by taxation, two, three or more hundred dollars for books to be added 
to the library and shall be glad of assistance in making snitable selections. — 
N. A. Parker. 

GLADSTONE. 

This is a railrord town and nothing is read but the newspapers. My wife 
succeeded in getting the Michigan traveling library, which is well read, but 
that is about the limit. — Chaa. E. Mason, editor of the Delia. 

' GRAND LEDGE. 

As a whole onr people do not seem to be what is called " bookish," bat a 
good library would go a loag way in establishing and increasing a love for 
books and reading which in the writer's opinion would be of inestimable value 
to all. — R. A. Latting. 

We have an association library, but am not positive about its circnlating; 
believe ladies onl^ have been interested in it. It is, at any rate, but of slight 
importance and is known to not more than 35 or 50 persons. The city 
library is scarcely a library, just a few public docaments, excellent ones, 
however, it is called a library more with tne idea that the name may impart a 
prestige that will cause it to become a nucleus. It has the messages and the 
papers of the presidents, red books, etc. The school libraries circulate only 
among those attending the schools; it is probable that others to a alight 
extent conld borrow bnt so far as I know only the pnpils avail themsclvea of 
the privilege. Grand Ledge very much needs a public circnlating library; it 
is possible that a plan such as the State Librarian can suggest would result in 
our citizens moving in the matter and inducing the city council to aid. — M. 
C, Phares, city clerk. 

GREENVILLE. 

The Udies' library association has a small library largely fiction of limited 

circulation. There has been agitation relative to a free library and I believe 

the time is propitious now. Hon. R. F. Sprague is much interested, as are 

others whose names I sent previously. — F. Smith. 

HARTFORD. 

I merely wish to state that our library was started throngh the inflnence 
principallv of two ladies and haa been organized but four ^ears, and is sup- 
ported as before stated by sale of tickets and giving entertainments. We have 
731 volumes and about (100 in treasury. Any help or advice would be grate- 
fully received, for we have worked very hard tor it thus far. — EInora Cham- 
berlain. 

D,3nz.<J.;>L.OOt^lC 



REPORT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

The amonnt which should be ased from taxes has beeu pat in the c 
school fund and shoald be (by vote) used for its proper ase. Mrs. Olney baa 
been looking op the matter, also Mrs. Chamberlain wonld do all she conld. — 
Mrs. PaoliQe T. Heald. 

HOUGHTON. 

There is a woman's library aseoctatioD at Hoaghton aboat one mile distant, 
which fills the requirements of a free library to a certain extent. — P. W. 
Nichols. 

JONESVILLE. 

The ladies' library association is a legal corporation started and managed by 
onr best ladies. It is not able to incur the expense of keeping it open as long 
as they much desire to do. — E. 0. Grosvenor. 
KALKASKA. 

The trastees of oar school have nsnally appointed- one of our citizens to 
look after the library, paying him eo much a year for his trouble, but the 
library has been used so mncb that it really amounts to nothing. No now 
books have been added in long time. — Jas. A. Harriot. 

LAINGSBURG. 

There is a limited membershipof those most likely to be interested in a cir- 
culating library here. The number of volumes, however, is small, and should 
not affect the starting of one such as you coutemplate. Personally I should 
be in favor of establishing a good library. — P. L. Evaus. 

LAKE ODESSA. 

Onr school library ie intended more especially (or the pupils, and very sel- 
dom enters the home. The other library is conducted and owned by the wo- 
m4>n. An association was organized under the head of "Ladies' Library As- 
sociation." We have a room the nse of which is given to us. Thursday after- 
noon it is kept open. — Mrs. E. Crane. 

L'ANSB. 

My observation is that the people here have a tasie for good literature, and 
were the attempt made I believe it would meet with hearty response.^Fohn 
M. Shank. 

LAPEER 

The ladies are negotiating with the school board to consolidate the two 
libraries and enlarge their scope and usefulnees. — E. C. Roberts. 
LAWTON. 

The Parmelee Co. of Chicago has (I think) ten libraries of fifty volumes 
each in the circuit which includes Lawton. Every three months there is a 
shift along the line so that in two years and a half we hace five hundred books. 
Only those can draw hooks who paid *3.00 when the library wa* started and a 
monthly fee of ten cents. It is a private enterprise. — Caryl S. Storrs. 
LUDINGTON. 

Our library ie free but fines are charged for books over.due. — Kate S. 
HatcbiDS. 

The building is unsafe as to danger from fire. The librarian is careful and 
tccommodating and the selection uiirly good. — G. T. Sawyer. , , 

6 * L.„-',z...,L.OOglC 



34 REPORT or BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

The library je well patronized, well maDu;ed and well located. There ia a 
demand for a free reading room which Bhallbe open evenings, bat the library 
seeniB to be giving very general eatisfactioD. — G. N. Stray. 

LUTHER. 

If your board will send an outline of the work and the probable expense 
of starting and maintaining a free library we will caDvasa the town and re- 
port, — n. W. Hammond. 

I do not know that our place of nearly 1,000 iahabitants could afford to es- 
tablish and maintain a free library. Would be pleased to know the plane of 
your commission. — W. B. Pool. 

MACKINAW ISLAND. 
Were the present books contained in the township library taken charge of 
by the public school and others added, to the library the movement would be 
an unqualified success. — JahieeH. Began. 

MANCELONA. 

Mr. Otis who owns a building here offers to give upper story for reading room 
and library and proceeds of lower room at about ISO per month toward the 
support of same. Expenses of keeping up building to be deducted from the 
rent. Correspond with Rev. Mr. Middleton on thesubject. — H, M. Goldren. 

MANCHESTER. 
Perhaps our library is doing as good work as possible in a place of this size. 
—Fred L. Hall. 

In my judgment an improvement conld be made in onr township library by 
the addition of more substantial works and by taking therefrom many of the 
works of fiction that are permitted to be read by immature minds. — F. M. 
Freeman. 

MANISTIQUE. 

The libmry is not used as much by the general public as it would be if open 
evenings. The patrons are principally school students. If a public library 
and reading room could be established in a central location aud be kept open 
evenings and Sundays it would be well patronized and serve a beneficent pur- 
pose. There has been considerable talk of lute of attempting to establish snch 
a reading room. — Virgil I. Hixson. 

MARCELLUS. 

Tliere are or have been two seta of the special state libraries in the village 
in the past two years for club use. How do you propose to establish a free 
library? — Mrs. Frank Huber. 

MARLETTE. 

The township library is I believe furnished with books from some fund, 
but the books are old and new ones undesirable. No one has any interest in it. 
Many dollars are spent hero for good books and penodicala and those of ua 
who have private libraries could lend continually. — Mrs, W. B. McOill. 

MARSHALL. 

It has been impossible to reach the people through a private aaaociation 
library (the school library is for the children) and we now propose to give our 
library to the city. It will either be housed in a new building for it or else , 

L.,nz.i.,>L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS, 36 

liave B room in the new high school building to be erected. — Mary W. Miller. 

There is also a pablic school library — do not know the number of volumes. 

We are agitating consolidating the two or making a free library with reading 

room if some one will fnrnish a suitable bailding. — No name. 

MASON. 

We have one citizen who has talked some of founding a free public library. 
That is the only prospect I see. — Geo. M. Bristol. 

There is some talk of consolidating the school and ladies' libraries as a public 
city library. As the ladits' library is largely ordinary current Action this 
wonld not be a good plan unless many concessions were made in the interests 
of the school. — E, D. Palmer. 

The ladies' library is practically defnnct. It has been closed entirely for 
some time. We are chartered for 30 years and don't know just what to do. At 
a meeting last week we voted to give the books to the city if we can do bo 
legally and the city will accept them. A committee waa appointed to inter- 
view Mayor Hemans on the aubject. We think much of the school library 
outside of books of reference might be combined with the ladies' library in a 
public library but we do not know how the school board feel in regard to the 
matter. We need a pablic library very much. — Mrs. S. H. Culver. 

The matter has been under discuasiou here for some years. There is a 
ladies' library here that is out of use by reason of the breaking down of the 
association. They are willing to place their property in a general library. 
The school library has been growing but a few years, but it is well selected 
and if a general library could be created I feel sure the district board would 
vote the outfit over to the general organization and we would then have a 
goodly beginning. Any suggestions yon may be able to give would be very 
gladly received. — Lawtou H. Hemans, Mayor. 
MBNDON. 

The library is patronized by a class of people who want light fiction. There 
are no reference works of value in the library. — Y. F. Hnntinf;;. 

MIDLAND. 

A free pablic library has been organized here and an attempt is being made 
to carry it to snccees. — Herbert MacCutcheon. 

Does the board propose visiting localities in interest of libraries? If so 
under what couditionsr What first several hundred books would it be most 
advisable to buy? — No name. 

MILFORD. 

While the school district will turn the school library fund into the tuition 
fond there is not much chance. I have induced tbem to stop above and in 
two years have bought 100 volumes for school. I^adies' library all right and 
ought to be encouraged. — W. J. Morrison. 

The library at the high school is small, good and growing. The books 
circulate freely among the pupils. The ladies' library association is new one 
with membership $1.00 per year. Contains *^46 volumes is kept at the 
residence of the President, Mrs. D. W. Wells, is open every Saturday after 
Doon. The ladies' library association is governed by a board of director 
elected annually, same to serve one year. — Robert Johnston. 

MT. CLEMENS. 

Would like to have our librarian have some practice in the State library. — 
3. C. Price. 



,36 REPORT OP BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

NASHVILLE. 

We have a ^ood school library eapported by dog tai and annaallj there is 
voted $30 until last year. Books are let out eyery Friday for two weeks to 
pupils or others. — Wm. Boston. 

NEW BALTIMORE. 

Our school library as noted above is largely the remnant of a defunct lihrary 
association that flonrished some 10 or 12 years ago. The beat books are about 
worn out and have been ao often reail that they are no longer in demand. 
Our anlTersity extension circle is made up of a special library from the State 
library, but the class of books were not of general interest. — -v. 0. Maya. 

I think a free library would be a splendid thing for this town. —Rev, J, W. 
Staoey. 

NEWBERRY. 

The library has been put in a school room and no one seems to have any 
authority. The school board are supposed to look after it but do not. The 
superintendent at preaent attends to opening it on Friday nights after achool. 
No taxes or fines are given to it. — Marie J. Gault. 

Many of our books are not euch as agood library ehould contain — no recent 
works. We ought to have from 100 to 200 new books. — Ed. Johnson. 
NILES. 

The library called ladies' library is in a very needy condition. Little 
public interest is manifested and it ia with difficulty it is maintained. The 
membership ia about 90 and many of those only 50 cents members, one dollar 
being the fee for the year. The 50 cents ones fail to renew on time so much 
is lost that way. — Mrs. F. M. Gray. 

OIBEGO. 

I don't think I nnderatand what you mean by a free library — if the State 
wanted to put in a free public library I think that room and party to care for 
it could be furnished. Popntation of Otaego village is about 2,500. — £. J. 
Rose. 

PAW PAW. 

The library ia open to the residents of the school district as above. We 
hope to add during the achool year about 200 volumes. It seema to be popu- 
lar with the people. We think the standing of our books ia better than those 
in the usual small library, I am greatly interested in this library, and will be 
glad to receive ideas, suggestiouB, etc. We have a very good room that does 
for the present. We prefer to spend our strength in increasing the number 
of volnmes rather than in trying to liave a building. The rnnuing expenses 
of the library are nothing at preaent. *-R. W. Broughton, Secretary of School 
Board. 

I think the present achool library entirely adequate, and do not believe 
another of any kind would succeed. — W. Rillefor. 

PENT WATER. 

Pentwater library is giving satisfaction to all and the people would not be 

without it. The rules are not strictly enforced and books are sometimes lost 

or mutilated. The fines are very seldom collected. It iaa pleaanre, however, 

to see our people, old and young, eager to get the books. — Fred Nielson. 

D.jnz.i.,,L"OOt^lC 



REPORT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 37 

PONTIAC. 

Two Hbrariee in Pontiac. One in charge of a corporation, the Ladies' 
Library^ and one which is controlled by the board of trastees of the city 
Bchool. The asaociation might be willing to take charge of free bookB sent as 
a circnlsting library gratie. If yon have an idea of trying to start a free 
library, saggeat that yon correspond with Joahna Hill, who might become 
interested and has ampls means. The city might take hold of the matter ez- 
ceptinc for the fact tnat expensive improvements have recently plunged it 
into debt. Possibly something might be done by co-operating with the school 
board, of which I think Hon. A. E. Tripp is secretary. — Aaron Perry. 

The Library Association has a new bniltling coating 18,000 and a library of 
3,000 Tolnmes, and it seems as if this ought to be the nuclens of fnture devel- 
opments. We have broached the subject of consolidation with the pnblic 
school library, with the proviso of keeping open every day and making the 
library free ; bnt aa onr bnilding was given to the association and is to revert 
to the heira of Mr. Stout's estate should the association cease to exist, it wonid 
he neceeaary for them to have charge, and the board (school) claim the pnblic 
money could not be used in this way. We would be greatly pleased if yon 
wonld consider the question and give na your opinion.— Xillian D. Avery. 

PORTLAND. 

I understand the tmstees are planning to bnj more books and are cor- 
responding with several publication houses. If yon can aid them in the 
matter, it will be good. — John II, Stewart. 

QUINCY. 

The present library uasociation would be only too glad to see the present 
made a free library if means were devised to maintain it. The five ladiea, by 
Uieir own efforts in socials and lectures, secure a few books each year and give 
their own time and furnish tickets at 50 cents per annum. — No name. 

RICHLAND. 

I am glad to report that onr library is in quite a flourishing condition. 
With the new year we held our annual meeting, electing officers. There are 
about 900 volumes on our ahelvea and soon more are to be purahaaed. — Mary 
Bradley. 

ROCHESTER 

A town of this size ought to have a good library of flrst-class literature 
only.— 0. J. Blackford. 

ROMEO. 

With present facilities for obtaining the books and as constant additions are 
being made I hardly think much better resalta could be had by any system. 
—0. U. Bradley. 

There is considerable wealth. The people are quite literary and I will be 
elad to do anything in my power to help establish a good free library. The 
high school library is not really a circulating library, — Gainer P. Moore. 
ROSCOMMON. 

The books in our library are old and some are in very bad shape. Our peo- 
ple would take more interest in it if new books could be obtained. In my 
opinion a free library would be just the thing for this village, — Charles L. 

"•*""'• D,,z.,.,L,ooglc 



38 BEPORT OF BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

SAGINAW. 

From a commnnication received from MisB Harriet Ames, Librarian of the 
Hovt Public Library, Saginaw, the foUowiog interesting facts hare been gath- 
ered: 

The Hoyt Library is free, not only to people in Saginav, bnt to any one 
who wishes to study, whether or not they are residents of the city. 

It is Bapported by an invested fund and by mnnicipal aid to the amount of 
♦1,000 per annum. 

The library is governed by a board of 6ve trustees, and owns a fine build- 
ing, which was erected at a cost of $53,000. 

The library is open daily from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. and from 7 to 9 P. M. 
Twenty-foQr thousand volumes are now on the shelves selected with a view to 
all departmeats of study. 

While the library is strictly one of reference it ia used freely by all classes 
of citizens. Nearly 6,000 children studied in the library in 1898. The total 
number of visitors to the library iu that year was 34,000, and 54.000 hooka 
were used. Of this number only 3G5 were fiction. 

The above facta show the work which is being done in the city of Saginaw 
by the Hoyt Library, and reflects great credit upon Miss Ames, who has been 
with the library from its inception. 

ST. JOHNS. 

This aesociation is doing fair work and is a great help to the town. It is 
quite well patronized and I think fairly supplies the needs of our town. — 8. 
B. Daboll. 

Because of the two libraries that we have at present I think it would be 
doubtful if another could be maintained. The "Ladies'" is enpported and 
managed by the inflnential ladies of the town. — No name. 

ST. JOSEPH. 

About 8,000 volumes were drawn from the library last year. — E. P. Clarke, 
Supt. 

Our library is in a very excellent condition and is very well patronized. — 
Mra. Lawrence 0. Fyffe. 

The town library was given to the city and placed under the supervision of 
the school board. The books are added to yearly as the fund will permit and 
are chosen with special reference to the demands of the people. The refer- 
once library is especially good for a collection so small. —Mrs. George E. Smith. 
ST. IGKACE. 

There are small chnrch libraries and one library with a fee of (5.00 for five 
years or less only containing 50 books to be changed every three months. 
Number of influential people would help a library and seem anxious for it. — 
Mrs. M. J. Malcrone. 

SALINE. 

Fiction comprises very largely the books selected. Modern works are 
needed. The school board make appropriations as urged to do so by the su- 

Eerintendent of school and teachers. A good intelligent school board exists 
ere and I believe they will do their part towards the improvement of the 
library if means can be devised. — F. J. Tooze, Supt. 

SARANAC. 

I add some names of persons who might become interested if their attention 

was called to the matter: Wm. Mercer, Hortense E. Horton, Mrs. Philip 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 39 

Tajlor, Mra. H. A, Ooodell, Wm. Fitzgibbons, Mre. Homer Andereoo. — Mre, 
H. Olmstead. 

SAUGATUCK. 

Public acbool has a library of 112 volumes purchased and managed by pu- 
pils aod teachers. Tvo churches have Sunday school libraries. Some pri- 
vate libraries in the homes. — B. A. Latt-a. 

8EBEWAING. 

Have had a town library for 30 years, within the last two years have started 
district school library. We appropriate a small sum each year for its maiate- 
nance. — 01 ire Peogra. 

SOUTH HAVEN. 

The Byat«m of shelving, record keeping by cards, etc., is np to date, simple, 
sdmirable.^Rev. C. De W. Bower. 

I am of tLe opinion that means shoald be used to acquaint the people more 
thoroughly of the existence and freedom of the library by a card in the pa- 
pers, printed list of new books, etc, — 0. A. Dean. 

SOUTH LYONS. 

Weare very much in need of a public library and reading room, a place that 
vonid be inviting for the young, bnt we are a corporated village only and my 
opinion is that such a measure would be voted down by the voters. I am in 
receipt of yonr last letter. —C. C. Ijockwood. 

SPABTA. 

We have an old township, kept in a drug store, a small stipend being paid 
for care, etc. The novels are the principal books read. Dr. D. J. Wallace 
J. W. Hallack and C. H. Loomis might be interested in the scheme. — J. H. 
Maynard. 

SPRING I*AKB. 

Thanks for circular letter. This township now has a good circulating li- 
brary and will probably not make any change. — A. Bilz. '' 

TECDMSEH. 

Three years ago the Ladies' Library society donated to the school district 
ftboDt 1,500 volnmes provided a free reading room and library be maintained. 
At the annaal meeting the books were accepted and the library has since been 
free to residents of the district. Five hundred dollars are raised annnally for 
its support. — No Name. 

THREE OAKS. 

This is a township library and is well patronized. Patrons are allowed to 
tike books home for one week.-^H. L. Hess. 

This township library haa been in operation about 15 years. Has done a 
good work, but conld be much improved by careful and personal attention 
of a competent person giving entire time to it. Our library has in the past 
beeu looked after somewhat by one of our local ministers, who had the 
authority to buy each year from tSQ to $100 worth of books. During the 

Kt few years this matter of purchasing has been looked after largely by the 
ird and the librarv has been well patronized and has done much in the line 
of education in this locality. — Wm. E. Hall. 

This library is what is known as a towship library free to all within the 
township limits. We wonid like to place such a library as yon mention in 
our public echools if it could be so arrauged. — F. F, Soveridge. 



40 REPORT OP BOARD OP PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

THREE RIVERS. 

The receipts from taxation from so small a locality are too small to carry it 
on aa it shonld be. If it could be helped by State tax io some way it would 
be a good thing. — W. J. Milletts. 

TRAVERSE CITY. 

Besides our free library we have a good high school library; also the I^adies' 
Library association have a large library which circulates in the homes of the 
members of the association.— H, C, Davis. 

Some systematic plan for purchase of new books is desirable. — J. W. Milli- 
ken. 

TRENTON. 

The M, £, chnrcb library contains volumes of science, travel and history of 
great value and it cost very nenrly t'fOO and I know that the trustees of the 
church wonid gladly — free of charge — open the reading room every day if 
means for keeping a librarian could be obtained. — K. J. Sundstrom. 

UNION CITY. 

I am ready to do anything I can to further the reading of good books. — 
E. M. McElroy. 

VICKSBURG. 

The free library is the Schoolcraft township library located in Vicksburg. 
A tax is spread each year to help it. The ladies have a library of 600 or 7W) 
volumes. And there is a good circulating library with a good class of books. 
Both these and the ladies' library are paid for by those who use them. — S. C. 
Van Antwerp. 

WAYNE. 

I think a free library open every night in the week would be an advantage 
to the young people of this or any town. Have not only a library but a resS- 
ing room that shonld have the best of literature for their nse, and if you have 
anything to propose toward that end write me and I will see what can be 
done. Judging from the bindings of the books in the library here, the books 
of fiction are most used, which is all right to a certain point, but not to the 
ntter exclusion of other literatnre. 1 believe I can interest enough people 
here to give whatever yon propose support that will he sufficient. — Owen 
Baymo. 

WHITEHALL. 

Library well adapted to the wants of the people. — H. B. Carr. 

WHITE PIGEON. 

If the women's club could be interested they would make it a success. — J. 
R. Williams. 

WILLIAMSTON. 

Onr school started a library last year. It is kept in the euperinteiident's 
office and for use of pupils onW during the school hour?. If we had more 
books and a librarian appointed and let out the books to be taken home, of 
course its influence would be greater. We have had little or no help from 
any outside source. As aschool we are running a lecture course this year, in 
the hopes of obtaining more funda with which to buy books. There is also a 
circulating library in town, — J. P. Willson, Supt. of Schools. 

D,..,.,L,ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



I have thoDght from time to time that it might be well to secnre ooe of the 
ciroalatiDg libraries from the state department, but my own time is so much 
taken np that I have hesitat«d to make application. I believe, however, that 
this should be done. — Harvey Tappan. 

A larger nnmber of books is needed. Nearly one hundred books are given 
ont each Friday. — J. Q. Roode. 



RGPOBTS FROM PLACES HATINO NO LIBRARIES. 

ABMADA. 

We have qtiite a fond on hand and we are not able to use it all with our 
present system of fnrniahing the traveling library; would it be advisable to 
add to our present system by buying more books and keeping a regular read- 
ing room? I think public interest in a good library could be awakened by 
some move in the right direction. Should be pleased to receive any sugges- 
tions from you. — C. H. Lincoln, ^ 

If a strong band could be here to advise and direct a single good library 
with reading room attached could be established. In time it vonld receive 
goodsapport. Had it been done two years ago I do not think it would have 
required mnch time. — H. Van Ommeren. 

ASHLEY. 

We have a school employing three teachers in which I expected to find a 

enbstantial library established, bnt instead of this the only remnant in this 

line that I can find is the international encyclopedia. — W. F. Cunningham. 

BENTON HARBOR. 

We have money in sight one year hence from taxation. — E. A. Hoffman. 

CLINTON. 

We are now using one of your libraries and find that the demand for the 
books is beyond our expectations. The library is open two nights per week 
only at the present time owing to the difficulty of getting some one to attend 
to the care of the books. This, however, answers the purpose very well as it 
is nnderstood by the people. The management is under the Young Men's 
Christian League and the library is kept in their rooms. — W, S. Kimball. 

Our village nas 1,000 to 1,300 population with a notable dearth of people of 
means who conld or would do much for'snch a cause. — W. S. Whittlesey. 

DOLLARVILLB. 

This is a saw mill town, the class of people here have neither books nor a 
taste for books and don't want either. — N^o name. 



There need to be a very small library here, but I think the books are most of 
them lost. I think it would be very nice and very beneficial if we could have 
one. — Mrs. 0. B. Morgan. 



i.vL.ooglc 



42 REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBKAKY COMMISSIONERS. 

I wonld be glad to see a library herej yet I am afraid it woald be a failure. 
If it shoald be undertaken, I will do all tbat I can to make it a saccesa. — 
E. S. Wagar. 

There is no township library here. Library money is naed for school pur- 
poses. This should not be. The library in school consists mainly of refer- 
ence books and supplementary readers. — H. J. Wilson. 

GAYLORD. 

We have no library here save a circulating one from the state. — T. W. Buck, 

HOWARD CITY. 

We have a town of 1500, many factory men who have no advantages and 
who are anxious to have both readinz room and librsry. Suitable rooms 
could be rented reasonably. Will do ^1 in my power to assist. — Rev. Wm. 
Tern pieman. 

ITHACA. 

A ladies' library asBOciatioa was organized here some twenty-five yean aco. 
It was maintained until about four years ago, when, on acconnt of local dis- 
turbances, it was turned over to the public school. At the time the association 
bad about 600 volames in the library. I shall be glad to asnst in asy way 
tbat I can, nnd I am snre there are many others here who will be willing to 
do likewise, — John M. Everden. 

LUTHEPL 

We have a small school library and a township library. Both are in poor 
condition and of little service to the public. — E. 0. Johnson. 

MORENCI. 

The old town libraiy, fonnded and managed by the progressive women of 
the town, proved too big a harden to be longer carried C^ Uiem, and several 
years ago was donated to the high school. I believe that many of our inSaen- 
tial people feel that it is a shame that we have no public library in oar town. 
— Mrs. W. Scott. 

NEWAYGO. 

In years past we have done something at times about library matters. Had 
an association library and quite a nice library, but a good many of the books 
were scattered around the country, and to save what there was left I took 
them to the school library. We once had a town library, but that all ran 
down, so there are but few books left. Our village is thinking of taking a new 
start and if we shall improve as we eipect, we may get up life enough 
to take hold of the free library matter as stated in your letter. I will talk the 
matter over with our people, and I think quite likely we may take hold of it 
next year. — John H, Simmons. 

Years ago there was quite an interest started and books bought and quite a 
start made toward a township library; bnt it soon went down. The books 
were moved from pillar to post and no one would take any interest in them. 
There are some books left, I think, and good work could be done if started 
and managed with some system. — S. D. Thompson. 
ONTONAGON, 

We had a library connected with the school before Ontonagon was burned, 
but none since.— J. S. Nitteraner, M. D. 

There is something of a literary spirit here, although it is limited and needs 

L.„.,z.i..;>L.OOt^lC 



REPORT OP BOARD OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 43 

enconnLgemeot. However, I believe there are people enough interested in 
sncb matters that a library sach as described in jonr lettr conld be snccess- 
fnlly established. — A. £. Shnster. 

Before oar f^reat fire of Angast 25, 1896, we had a library in connection 
with onr high school, bnt since that time nothing has been done in regard to 
same, hence we have none at present. I think if the proper parties were 
appealed to enough interest could be awakened bo that one conla be started. 
Hise Ella A. Chamberlain, snperintendent of schools for oar township, was 
formerly secretary and librarian. There are few amnsements here and since 
fire spoken of the people who almost to a person lost all of their belongings, 
have not been able to purchase books to any extent. — J. J. Vincent. 
OVID. 

Unquestionably a well chosen free library would be an inestimable blessing 
to oar town. — M. M. Martin. 

We are quite a reading people and many of the citizens have quite good 
home libraries. The hi^h sonool has a good school library and the lower 
rooms have each a start in that direction, exclusively for the school. — £. M. 
Plunkett. 

READING. 

A Parmalee circulating library has recenUy been introduced here. 
Personally I do not think such a library practical. There has been some talk 
dnring the last six months of starting a public library something after the 
methwlof the Qnincy public library. Owing to a disastrous fire which visited 
onr village August 26 last, nothing has been done in regard to the matter and 
owing to the extra expense necessary in starting a library dnriu^ the cold 
weather we have thought best to wait until spring. In the meantime any in- 
formation that you ean give us in regard to the matter will be thankfully 
reoeived. We fully agree with you m regard to the benefit derived from a 
public library through which onr citizens especially the young can receive for 
a trifiing amount good reading. — George C. Crane. 

BTANDISH. 

We are just agitating the subject of a young men's reading club with fair 
promise of success. The library commissioners oosld help us wonderfully. — 
0. S. Uommery. 

VASSAR. 

The library we have is a movable section library a section of which is locat- 
ed in one of the several stores, the proprietor of which tends to it. A nice 
bailding and public hall and library are needed. — Frances £. Townsley. 

The Parmalee traveling librair baa a number of sections here and it has not 
given complete satisfaction. I fear the time for another library is not now. — 
Austin E. Wilber. 

WILLIAMSTON. 

I presented the above to the Woman's club and they appointed a committee 
to secure pledges from the various societies of the town to start a library un- 
der the supervision of the Woman's olnb. We will inform you later if we 
sncceed. — 0. W. Beardsley. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONED 

MICHIGAN 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1901 



™ . i,Gooijle 

,«v.. ^^K CUAWKORn («. OF LAN^ttfid. MUll. 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.d I, Google 



LETTER OF TRANSJIIHAL. 



Lansing, Michigan, January 31, 1901!. 
Hon. Aakon T. Bliss, 

Oovemor of Michigan. 
Sib — I have the honor to submit the Second Iteport of the State Board 
of Library ConiBiiesioaerH for the year ending January 31, 1902, 
Very pespeetfully, 

Cyhos G. Luce. 

President. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT. 



Three meetingB of the Board of Library ConiiiiiBsioners have been held 
ID the past year, as foDovs: 

April 10, 1901. 
June 4. 1901. 
December 11, 19(11. 

All meetings having been held in the State Library. 

Paring the past year the work of the Board has been largely elementary, 
the plan having been to establish a strong foundation for more rapid 
development in the future. Two hundred and seven letters have been_ 
written and 175 received, all tlie correfipondence having borne directly 
npon the snbject of free public libraries. 

Three documents have been prepared by the Secretary and printed and 
distributed by instruction of the Itoard : 

Catalogue of books suitable for a Free I'nblic Library. 
Free Public Libraries in Michigan. 
Women's Clabs and Free Public Libraries. 

The latter being the paper read by the Secretary before the State Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs. 

REQISTBATION OF Lmit&BIES. 

The following libraries have registered with the State Board of Library 
Commiseioners, the registration number being given: 

Allegan Co. — Sbelbyville, dist. 5, Martin twp. No. 6. 
Arenac Co. — Sterling, Ledyard free library No. 9. 
Bensie Co. — Frankfort, dist. 1, No, 2. 
■ Iosco Co. — ^Au Sable public library No. 1, 
Lenawee Co. — Tecnmseh free public library No. 7. 
Ogemaw Co. — West Branch twp. No. 4. 
St. Clair Co.— Riley twp. No. 3. , 

Sanilac Co.— Speaker twp. No. 5. , LiOOQIc 

Wayne ('o. — New Boston public library No. 8. "^ 



6 LIBRARY COMUISSIONERS. 

The following libraries, having the requisite number of rolumes on 
their sheh-ee, have received the loan of books offered by the Board: 

Martin twp. — 57 volumes. 
Armada — Two shipments of 100 volumes each. 
Sterling, Ledyard free library — 100 volumes. 
New Boston public library — 100 volumes. 
Alden public library — 50 volumes. 



LBCI8LATI0N. 

The Ipgisloture of 1901 enacted the following law: 

(No. 19ft.) 

AN ACT to require county commissioners of schools to transmit lists 
of public libraries and the librarians thereof. 

Tlie People of the State of Michigan enact: 

Section ]. Hereafter it sbnil be the duty of the county commissioner 
of schools, in each county of this State, in the month of June in each 
year, to transmit to the Secretary of the State Board of Library Commis- 
sioners at rinsing a complete list of all libraries, other than personal 
libraries within his county, whether township, school, district, village 
or city, together with the names and post office addresses of the librarians 
thereof. 

Approved June 3, 1901. 

Acting under the law circulars and blanks were sent to the county 
commissioners of schools in each county with the request that the sta- 
tistics be gathered and returned to the secretary. Two thousand five 
hundred blanks were sent out and about 1,200 have been returned, only 
about 50 per cent having complied with the law. With the aid of informa- 
tion gatltered from the office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction 
statistics of nearly 6,000 libraries have been tabulated, showing to a cer- 
tain extent library conditions in Michigan. The results of this investiga- 
tion are not encouraging. Twenty-two counties have made no report, 
and in others only a few townships and districts have filled and returned 
the blanks. The returns so far as we have received them show 4,427 
libraries in the State, containing 1,309,174 volumes, |33,441.80 having 
been expended for books in 1901. 

The appended statistics show library conditions by counties so far as 
we have been able to gather them from the blanks which have been 
returned. The report is necessarily very incomplete from the fact as 
stated above that only about 50 per cent of the blanks sent out by the 
Boar<] were returned, linough is shown, however, to justify the opinion 
that the diversion of library funds from the purchase of books to general 
school purposes has been ruinous to the growth of township and dis- 
trict libraries in Michigan. The short-sighted policy which has deprived the 
residents of the rural districts of good literature, has towered the ilitel- 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. ' 

lectoat etanding of the coinniuDity and has taken from the people the 
means of self edncatioo. The children bare lost the benedts of aupple- 
meotary reading, and those who hare been obliged to leave school at an 
early age are debarred from the means of self culture furnished by well 
selected t>ook8. 

Hon. John D. Pierce, who made a life study of education and who 
is known as the father of oar common school system, in a report made to 
the l^slatnre in 1836, said: 

"No means, next to the establishment of schools, can be more admir- 
ably adapted to the Intellectual and moral culture, the improvment and 
progress of the people in knowledge, than the founding of well selected 
libraries." 

That there is a desire for good reading on the part of rural communi- 
ties has been fully demonstrated by the eagerness with which they have 
availed themselves of the traveling libraries and other helps given by 
the State, none of which however can take the place of a public library 
owned by a town or district, and controlled by legally constituted 
authority. That each town in the State should have such a library or 
libraries was the plain intent of the constitution and of subsequent legis- 
lation. Whatever diflference of opinion there might have been as to the 
relative merit of township and district systems, there was none as to the 
vital necessity of libraries as indispensable factors in the educational 
plan of the State. 

From reports received by the Board from different points it is believed 
that there is a growing interest in the establishment of free libraries, 
and that it onlv needs prompt and united action on the part of the 
officers and teachers of schools aided by the Board of Commissioners to 
bring the library system of Michigan up to its proper standard, and to 
give to the people of the State the library privileges planned for them by 
the coostitntion and by early legislation. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



LIBEART COMMISSIONERS. 
FubUc, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. 



"f^^iV^:: 


It 


cu„. 


lating. 


Own 
ot 
rent 


Support. 


1 


Citalogae. 


Alcona Co.. 
































































































































































^^^iL^i. 


IWl 


School 


ClrcQlaang. 






















































im 


Scbool 


CircDlAtiog. 


Own.. 


8nb.>n<10Dei 


























All DM 
















Al.gn,BcboolU 


im 


Bobool 


BoUi 


8 B.. 
















School 

School 

School 


ClrcatoUng 


a- 










IH» 










Own.. 


SubMrtpHoD 




























IfSS 
1800 

im 


Scbool 

School 

&i ::;::: 


ClrcalAtlDK. 
CTtculMlig. 












Own.- 
8 a... 

15::; 










Thx. and Unci 














































IMS 






8S:: 










School 


Cli«nUrtng. 






































































Scbool 


CtrcaUtlng. 


B}. 


SEirn'"" 






ISl;^":i::;;: 


I8BJ 
IBM 






































1H8 


Tnwnihlp.. . 


ClrcalAtlng. 


Own.. 


































IBM 


School 






Til. and aub. 








.. 
























1B8T 


Scbool 

School 

School 

School 


ClTculfttlng- 


Own.- 
Own.. 
Own.. 


n«. and lub. 














1893 


















18M 
1865 


CiicuUMng. 














■nu. ao^ Bnn 




























Free pabl'te 























B B School bonding. 



vLiOOglc 



SECOND ANNUAL REPOET. 
Public, School attd Society Libraries in Mitibigau. — Continued. 



Vol- 

unt. 


Pan- 

■b^lvet 
Dec^ 
IWl. 


Book! 
dor- 


i 


peoded 
durliiK 


Or- 
3° 


Books 
refer- 


Ubrartan. 


Remarks. 


















No report to board. 
No I^rtM board! 
report to board. 

(o report to board. 
n report to board. 


























































































































































W 


«(> 


Nellie Van Fatten. 




17 






No report to board. 














jK ,....»... 




MM 






Etta McOmber. 




1 

1 








No report to board! 

No report to board, 
10,30 In Ireasarj. 
No report to board. 































» 




100 


m 














TBOO 

30 00 






H^.«e.=to.b. 
















No report to board. 


























BOO 
MOO 
900 




■ 1 


IMetrict board. 
FraokHoiey 










30 


40 


[Bbetlersohool.J 






















No report to board. 






IM 






N. J. Ferris. 
B. 0. RockweU. 














a 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 


















* 




























6 

4 




IT BO 
30 00 






SST;. 




St 


3(1 
43 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 
























» 




James H. BillinKs. 






I 








No report to board. 
Bo report to board. 

No report to board. 
Ko report to board. 














•• 


' 


ie» 


10 


30 


RoaaM.8turg1i. 
















si 


I 




woo 






OeotgeW.Sproat. 

Jessie D. Orion. 

K. D^klials. 

J. W.Garvellnk. 






40 




























oo 








\ 




100 














in 




ISO 


12 


« 


Harm Bowes. 


















■' 





10 LIBRARY OOMMISaiONBRS. 

Fublic, School and Soeiely Libraries tn Michigan. — Contisued. 



•^SSSti^^^XS^ 


i 


CIui. 


Reference 


Own 






CaWogue. 


^iKS'.-^^'A;. 

S:spg:J :::::::::: 


1»W 


iJSa :::::: 


SESSS: 








Own.. 
















tm 






H«,.. 




































Q9n|e«,I>.T 


im 


Bihioiv.::;; 


Ci«ni»ttni'. 


si:;. 


■itaittoi' 






























^^ 


'i^' 


Sa :::::; 


Bolh 


ti. 








()UDPI)>ln9,D.A 
































189T 


School 

Fre^blic 


ClrcuUUng. 










OuDPlBlni.D.10 


■ 

SB... 








Hawtlon.... 


















sohcwir::: 














isuo 


CIrcnUtIng 










h D B 














S«1"X>' 


Circubtlng 
























School 


Both 


Own.. 


ik^.andBoee 












H^nwlri n 


190ft 


IS :::::: 


ClrcOUtlne 
Circulating 






















IBM 


flB... 


Taaillon.... 




























ISM 


, 




Own 










g?SJS! 


artutaWnii 
Circulating 


8S:; 


s::ssss 


.... 
































1»» 


school 




SB... 


Fl 












Tax.sTiil fees 












tafsSSSI":::;:::. 


18SU 
















SB... 






























18W 






SB.,. 




















1900 






Own.. 
Own.. 
























School 


BeterencB. 










!«« 


oSn.. 






















IMS 
















Townrtilp... 


Circulating. 


Rent.. 


Tai.andanea 
















im 






^K- 
















































im 














Mmnl*r«tT 
























































f .1 iiin1i> 


•Free public and achoo 


t 


Free to town 


hip. 9Ba 


hoolliu 


lldlng. I Fin 


e«a 


«.V».'^' 



SECOND ANNUAL BKPORT. 
Public, Bduial aitd Society lAbrariet iii Michigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 

•helTM 
W«.. 
UOl. 


Dm., 

im. 


dar- 


- 


Ex- 
pended 

1' 


Clr- 
culaUoD 

booki. 


Booka 
naed for 
refer- 


■ 


Remarka. 




10 


B 

4 


KS 


























No report to board. 






18 00 






Nellie Koowlton. 








No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


























in 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















BSTS 
KM 






E™hL"BS;wn. 
















No report to board. 














n 




3 7S 


TS 




Oecar B. Howe. 
Maude M. Aeblef. 




9» 




S 




IT 00 


m 


so 


No report to board. 












KW."' 






IT BO 














No report to board. 






noo 






Jacob Blotman. 








No report to board. 




> 


IT BO 






Mla»Cot«Krug. 








No report U> boant. 












aatle Waahbam. 


n 




MOO 


B2 


B2 
























« 


ao' 


« 
ss 

1 










S-vU'Loi,,,. 

ralvln Hrlfton. 
W. R. Mrera. 




» 




leeo 
sow 

21 2£ 


as 


^ 
















No report to board. 












T^.f:""'"' 
























No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 


IW 


■i 


20 00 


ISO 


40 


A.C.Jonee. 




1 


10 












H 


' 


nso 


M 


80 


E.. I. Steely. 








50 


50 


Mrs. Ida Brown. 
J. T. HartlD. 






E 




u» 




K 








No report to board. 


** 




woo 


IZB 


It 


JobD Lnbbeta, 














No report to board. 






J 




lis 

vats 






J. F. Waletrum. 












W 


00 








4 

im 




No report to Itoard. 






1T» 






Simon Kem. 




MT 


K3 










SpSSM: 






N 






































■' 


O 



UBRARY GOMHISSIONBB8. 
Public, School and Socifty Librarica in Michigan. — Continued, 



"SSiS^iX!^: 


1 

•s 

1* 


CUM. 


Utli>s. 


Own 

buUd- 
Ing. 


Support. 




Ckialopie. 


"fe-ofir,"".":. 




















































ar.;: 


Both 


t 










ism 
























Rant. 
8B... 


































1R» 




anmutmg. 


Own.. 
Own.. 








£LTB:I:::;:::::::- 


Scbool 


T^tlon 




Prtntod 




















18U 


Bcbooi 




SB... 


















1898 
ISM 


Bchool 

School 


ClrcDUtlnc- 


Own 










SB... 


■nx.aiidflnM 












L"^!;:!::r.:::;: 


iws' 


School 




SB... 
Own.. 






































rS;!fi: 


'isw' 




SS;; 


RS?"" 




















isn 


i^SSSl::::: 


arculatlng. 
Circulating. 








BmwTd boot. . . 


oWn.. 










WritMn 


j 


















■iiii- 


ISESS! 


Clrcnl»tlog.| SB... 












Written 






ClrcuiiitiDg. 






























































1 




"im 


6fbool 

SS::::: 
schimV.;!!;; 






Written 


wIJSSi'^Dl^ 


ClicalatiDg. 
O^uUttag: 








'fiin.V.'.'.'.'.'.'. 




^SlhHE; 


sb;;; 


1 

■ ■.; CM..'. 






























w.?rW,D;Bn:::::::: 


1IW1 


School 


.""'"'»^»; 




TM.>ndflDM 




















*'Jt?^,^B 






Both 


8B... 


Tuutlon 










































• Ftm public and (choii 




DDewe; 


p bnlldlDg. 




K School bnU 


ding 


,L.ooglc 



8EC0KD ANNUAL REPORT. 13 

PMbtie, School and Society Librarie» in Michigan. — Contisdgd. , 



Vol. 


IMl. 




I 




Cir. 
boSki. 


Book* 
OMdlor 
refer- 
ence. 


Librarian. 


Bemarka. 






B 












Vd report to board. 
\[i report Ifl board. 
N J report lo board. 


















a 


















S,000 


100 


Albert Viedevald 












SO 


38 




(MM 
20 00 






Old library soK). 











«> 










>i report to board. 


. t» 




! 


. 


4 re 


30 


' 


L. Wfntele. 
John aiDe-Brfok. 






N 11 report to board. 


















WM 




M 


F.J.Biiege. 






^[> report to board. 






4 








r^.^'^'"- 


i5 


• 


MOS 


Kf 30 


No report to board. 






MM 










10 


Chi-Pord/: 








Nd report 10 board. 
S D report to board. 
Sc report to board. 




































Amy Troy. 
Cora Hare. 






03 








S 
IS 








No report to board. 
N 1 report to boerd. 














too 






L. ¥. Brender. 




00 


S 






:::::::: 


1 

1 

1 




13 H 








^ 1 report to board! 














:;:: 


S«6 






Mrs. E. Stone. 
Hra. Sarab Beacb. 






B 








S report to board. 






s 




11 SO 






C. I. Wicks. 








^ report to board. 
SjrepSrtWboatd; 
N 1 report to board. 
































» 

M 


s 
















sia 


w 




rnink T. UlVler. 
James r. JackMn. 




* 














30 


SO 






io' 

9M 


B 
IS 

113 






N 3 report to board. 

Ni report to board. 
N report to board! 

N report to board. 
N report lo board. 












F. 0. Laraway. 






































10 so 






HelviQGurley. 






















i< 


us 00 


O.OOT 




Emjly E. Oliver. 










IZ 

























































i.,L.OOglC 



UBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, SckiMil and Sociclg Libraries in Vickigan. — Cchtihcei). 



<'ounty. city, dtatriot, 
wwinhlp or vllUga. 


i 

1 

h 


flu*. 


ll«fe«DCB 

latlnB. 


Own 
ing.* 


Bupporl. 


_ 


Cal&IOKDe. 


Alpena Co —(Ton.; 


im 










Written 














line 




Both 


































Antrim To.; 
















































































II*k D4II 


































































































































































































IKS 










































































































































































Aren^to.: . 


1888 






SB... 




















































Deep River, Jarvls 




School 




SB- 


SubKrtpUon. 






















IS::: 












School 




















MftOon.D.8. 

SiSj^Bi'fl:::::::: 
































B*™^C^; 


















1870 


Townahip... 


EC-;: 


Ovn.. 
SB... 
















BirryCo.; 














































































wr 



• TowDRhip clerk's offlce. 



B SfhiKil building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in llichigan. — Costinui 



Tol- 

•helve. 
Dee.. 


P"'?" ; added 


1 

1 


EI- 

'Si' 

boom. 


Cir- 

b<^k*. 


Boob* 
Died tor 
refer- 


Ubrarian. 


RemarkB. 










100 




Paul De Uvsl. 














No report to board. 




I 10 




ti«oo 






Wm. H. Foi. 








No report to board 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to hoani, 

Norlp^nub^^l 






' 




































30D 

MB 
» 
42 






























1 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


;;::-;;-i;::::!^' 
















































2 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 














60 


























» 
HS 

1st 

MO 
131 














10. 






















No report to board. 
No report to board! 




J 


... 


600 


100 


■** 


Lonna Kocber. 








































No report to board. 


























No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 




























































X 




16 00 




6« 


Ida L. Bullock. 








IM 














No report to board! 
















M 


30 










Frank HamUton. 










No report lo board. 




r 










9. Hende'r^n. 








3 




31 










No report to bo&rd. 
No report lo board! 














































g 












NoK'"*SMbSlJd' 














XX 














No report to board. 




w 




12M 


«0 




!;:S:SKZ: 








lU 










No report to board. 
NSrepSSwI board! 






















^ 


































.l.ooalc 



16 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Hublie, School and Socirtg Librarica in Michigan. — Costikced. 



Connijr.eity.dislrlot, 
towMhlpotvllUee. 


1 


CUM. 


Kefenuce 


Own 

bulld- 
tne. 


Bnpport. 


■ 


CaUloguc. 




























































































































































■ 














































































::::i:::::::: 














Rent.. m.MidflDM 










BchwI.,."., 










































































































1886 


Lwllfli-llb-; 


Both 


Rent.. 


Dae. 






























































































































IrVlllC.g.S.j|. 








I-::::::-:-^ 
























































1 






































































1 
























































1 






































































1 






























































< 1 1 ( , , 


_^ 


:::-amc- 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School aiift iS'ocir/y Lihiariat in iUckigan. 



IBM. Wl. ^*"- J 


1 1 

pended Cir- j Books 
dorlBg eulatlon aa«ltor 
jfear : of refer- 

1 


Ubrarlan. 

• 


Remarka. 












































10 










12 












No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 
No report lo boanl. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


1 






, 
















IS 
40 


















































I 


















■"aw* u 










No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to iHwrd. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board 
No report to board. 
No report to Hoard. 
No report to board. 

No rej»>rt to board! 
No report to boa ril. 
No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report lo board. 

No report in board^ 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 

No report is board! 
No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report lo board! 
No report t.) board, 
Noreiwrttoboard. 

No report to board. 

No report to b^fd! 

No report to board. 
No report W board. 

i .nnalp 


-6 


•JiSS 


DOS 

1,000 


200 


■r.a. keeier. 
Alex Brown. 














* 




































-s 

20 DO 
























»e 






M. RoMtla Goodiear. 








; si 


























i . 




I 




a 






























M 




20 






















ffi 
























«6 




















































as 




» 


































-::::;: 


1 


1 












40 


















101 
1M 




1 










21 


















! 


1 1 




S 








, 


..■- 1 ; 




' 



















18 LIBRARY C0MM1S8I0NBES. 

Public, School and Society lAbraiies iit Michigan. — Costikued, 



Conntr. city, dlMrlct, 


i 

1 

1-* 


Clua. 


Referanne 


Own 
rent 


Support. 


6 


Catalosne. 


"oS-SaSoT. 




























































































































































































































5KJS?g{S: S: !■:::;::: 
























































z.zzz 







































































v^^^^"'^d'i" 










































'^l^^T 








Om.. 




























Both 


Sit... 


























Own.. 

lei.: 










80.00. 


Botb 


























































■FiMer.D.2. 


















































isaz 






SB... 






















im 


School 




Own.. 
















































Olb n D B 


















I8M 


School 


Clmuiitlng. 


Own.. 


















































1 






IHM 


School 


Both 


Own.. 














1878 






Own.. 



















■Fre* public and school. 



.jHt- 



SECOND ANNUAL BEPOET. 19 

Public. School and Socicly Lihrariea in Slichigan. — Costisued, 



Dec., 
19C0. 


Fam- 

:-^ 

Dec., 
Iinl. 


Book* 
added 

?a"" 




Ei. 
peoded 
during 

'C 

book!. 


dt 


Book! 
need tor 


Librarian. 


Bemarka. 






, 


1 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board ^ 

No report to board. 
No™SS«Sb^- 












































* 














1 












ao 










1 










a 


















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
Norepirttoboard. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
































Ma 

40 




1 


























4 


































» 
















SO 










lllj 






















1 










No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to b0M;d. 

No report to board^ 


































































::::::: 




ttBCO 






Oicar Carter. 


30.M) 


1,M0 
80 








No report to board. 






DO 


BOO 


H. G. Baroe. 








No report to board. 






14 78 


23 




Frank Toblaa. 




s 












«9 00 


300 






I. Ml 






No report to board' 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















































































ISO 


7B 






1 1 






NO report to board. 








X 


30 


OttoJ.MkiiarV. 




ao 

1 






Ho report to board. 


























No report to board. 
Ho report to board. 


















BOO 


WO 




Geo. E. EMex. 




1 w 






No report to board. 


























N^JSpSPtSbSfS: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






S7 












10« 


» 




WOO 


TB 


12fl 


D.P.&eMr. 






03 00 


1.490 




R. D. rUrtlcr- 












AiOOQlC 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

I'ulilic, i^ehtKil ami Kocirli/ Libivriet in Michigan. 



Cniintr.alty. cliatrtct, 
tcwnihlporvilKgo. 


1 

1* 


Oa». 


Reference 
latlng." 


Own 

Ing. 


Support. 




Catalogue. 


lUv Cn.-ron.: 
MonVir'^Di 


im 


Tinmahlii,. . ■ 

School Kcfennce..; 8 11... 








Monitor, D, ! 


-"■ 




^r-,- 


M Ito D * 








a::S:B:SS::::::::: 








Mt. Forest, D. 2 

Plnconning, 11. 3 


IBM 


.:;„.:: :::::::::j^;: 


Tax.andHneB 
Ito.aiidBnea 

'iffnOT! !!!'!.!" 
nnetkiidVeei 

'Finei!:::!!!!! 




Written 


Porwmouth. T 

West B.7 City 

WLIllams.D.^ 

Win lam a, D. 4 


Townahlp... Reference. 

School RetereDce.- 

Townahip.:: Botb;::;"!: 

i 


Rent.. 

Own !! 
Rent.: 


'printed!!!.!...! 


Almi™, 1).3 

Almlr»,T 

BenionlH, II, 1 

Benionte Aodemy.,.. 

ltlane,l>.:i 

Bl«ne.l>.4 

BtonelT.'.. ..!!"!""!! 

?2!SJ;^±::::::::::: 
^K^eVL-.Y''-.^::::: 


iikif 

'i«M* 
im 

i'm 
'isMi' 


School 

Townsbip... 

'oii'iegi::;:* 

Free public 

school'."!!! 

Townihlp.. . 


Kef ere nee .. 
circiiUtlnii. 


Own.. 
Rem.. 

diii!! 

Own!! 

■Rent*.! 


Flnea 

Flnei 

Tax! and flnei 




Written 


Gllmore,n.2 

Oiluiore, II. s 












S=::SS:B:!:::::::: 

Inland, D. 3 


School!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!! 


'own!! 


'rinea!!!!!!!!! 


'■■"^ 


IDI nd D T 




1 






Inland, T 

ai5:g:l:::::::;:: 


















i^ Fr^^obiif 










rUMe,D.a 






"1 


-wVitten!!!!!!!! 




im 






1 Taiatlun 

' Taxation 












wSidonVT::::::::;::::: 

HainbrldKC, >.2n 


fownahip... 

j 




Balnbrldge.I).4 

Balnbringe. U.eti 






Vru'Volr"'" 



public and school. S It Buhool bullillng. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 21 

/'utile, A'cAooI aiul Hucirty Libraries in iliekigan. — Costisued. 



nnw* 
IBW'.' 


Pam- 

tb*lve« 
Dee., 

ttoi. 


1 


El. 
pended 


boflki. 


uiedtor 




Remark*. 






W 




Fred Beyer. 
V. H. Needbam. 








1 ' ^ 


»T90 








No report to board. 




30 


12,.... 


3M 




Teacher. 


• 




No report to board. 
No report lo board. 
No report to b.*rd. 
No report to board. 








































»l,... 


UZ9 


WO 


30 


Arthur llainalti. 
LoulsA.Pelkey. 










Ko report to board. 












m 


Wm. H. Relnk.. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
Noreiiorttoboard. 


w 


30 ... 


a>w 




^ .iameBtVtier. 


«w 




IIM ... 


woo 


MO 


:na ; ^anth .r. Oviatt. 


so 




' ::;■ 


*.** 


:» 


M L. U. Spallonl. 
j «m.J.Sbllllda,v. 




m 


28 ... 








Cb«..W.nabcock. 




20 00 




soo 






3u 


Wm. MeKtmtry. 










So report to b.«rd. 








■ 900 


29 












Geo. H.Wil«on. 
















Xo report to board. 

No report to lioard. 
No report to board. 

No report to iHiard. 
No report Wb^rd. 


w 

I,™ 


"w 


2TS "i 


I.W1W 


i.Juo 


;;:::;:::■: »'?"'. o?wici.ham. 









































































3 ... 








ivm 


A 


iminbj. 


as ; 










' 






























































3t ... 








SI, 


■■; 










41 
























Mri 


L. 




1 














So rejiort tti 



No report to board. 



!. F. A. Ifuacan. 



_ i o6glc 



LIBRART COMBUSSIONERS. 



Fublic. Hcbool and SocU'li/ Librariet in Jlickigan. — Costisued. 



■"^SigSSSS? 


1*1 


Rererence 
or circu- 

UUBg. . 


OWD 

lug. 


Support. 


1 


CaUlogue- 


































Clrouhitliig 
























































































































































fs^z.^^rr-'' 


18W 


rre* public 


Both 


Rent- 


liiiiitoii 


I» 


l^.«iidc«rrt.. 






Scbooi 

9ch<«.l 


Both 

Rcfereace. 


SB 








Uarrien, D 1809 


Own.. 


■Ikr.and«ub.. 




■airt.:::::;::::: 
































BB... 


Tu.mn(iraM. 
















































H r d D IBW 






SB... 


8ab.andlu.. 


































IHM 


School i Ctrcutatl'oK 


Own.. 


SubKrIptlon. 
SocUls £ fees 


































Ta<fD*hlp... ClrcDUUnB 


SB... 


Enterc'mnEa.. 
Ttx-andflnei 






1890 


























si'h^i 
















Own.. 










1 " 
































School ; ClreulMlng 


SB... 
















Chlokamlog, I).3 


School ' Rclerence.. 

School ! CItCUlMlDg. 














































i 




























































1 
































im 


School ' Clrciilatlng. 


Own.. 






Ptd.iDd evd.. 







■Ftm public and (Cbool. SB School bi 



l> newer— Cutter ej^W'- 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Ifublic, Svhotil aiiii Socirii/ Librarim in ilichisun,- 



Vol- 1 


Pun- 

phlete 

■faX« 


Booki 
added 
dor- 

IS.. 


8 


1 


book!. 


Bonka 


Librartan. 


Remarlts. 


1 


4 










NS^pSEttob^rd! 

No report to board. 


























BO 




3 








Taacher. 




4 








No report to board. 

No report to board! 
Norei-orttoboard. 


'Z 












a 






























23 




































No report to board] 
So report to board. 


en 


























a.«oi m 


lil 


n.oai w 


11.698 




LoDlae H. Baflej. 




No report to board. 










40 


40 


Verne I-ybrook. ■ 
Blanrben:. Slm|>K>D. 


1! 


" 




S(u 


No report to board! 
No report to board. 

No report to hoard! 
NorapSEcwbSSid! 














8 












M 






26 00 


30 


46 


Lllltan l>aterb«Qgb. 


















J7 

1 * 

' U 


































Emma Arnold. 












No report to board. 




« 






















Itf 


zs 


* 




DBS 




W 


Cbkries Etodeen. 
Chailotle A. Phllllppt. 


















10 


""si'l M 


















U4 




»0D 


134 


134 

1 


Amelta Taylor. 
Mn. B.S.Allen. 






6 


40 
3 

2 
























SSlffiV.,. 






3 


l&OO 
























No report to boaril. 


LWS 














O.S.GIiaden. 










No report to bi-ard. 




I 






Nora Franklin. 














SB 

ID 




























laa 








No report to board, 




» 




















11 


























No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 




























10 










m n 




laso 


60 


H Laun E. Wood. 


.LiOOglC- 















24 LIBBABT COJUOSSIONERS. 

/'uftJic, Schaot iind Hoctrly Libraries in Michigan. — Coxrl.vl 



Cnnnlf. Mt^.^litrlct, 
to«ni.lpo';vlll.ge^ 


it; 


"uMng. 


Own 
rent 

IDK. 


Support. 

1 


CnMlOBoe. 


Kerricn Co^Con.: 








[ 


















18a:i B«hmd 


Refetence.. 


Own.. 
























1901 , School 


Both 


SB.., 


Entertalnm'Ca 














Towniblp... 


ClrculatliiB. 
























■IU.kndfliiM 








i 
















iS!SS:i::::::: 


'igafl'.'si'ii^V.:": 


Circuiting: 


■sb:::|V::::::::-::::1:;:: 


■(irt.'.::;:;::::: 




1 ' 1 






n^t.?,i 


189B, School 


ClrcuUtlnB. 


Own.. 


















1H80 ; School 


Rafetenra.. 


;■„■'■! '"'■■ 


W 1 to 






































































1 














isixi : School 

tWI School 


dTcnUUng- 


8U.,. 


Suh, ind feas 








Written 












1 




















ISSsl!^::;::: 


1»9T School 

IWM School 


Both 








Sub.»d Ik. 
























SEK-ir--- 






S B... 




















....j 












.^1^'r.';::::: 


OlrcuUllnK- 


SB... 


RulMcrlption. 










iws|scho«i 


CiMutotlne. 


Own- 




....] Written 


^^s^Yr"'-" 


im Urhuol 

1S91 School 


I'tot'li 

Reterenc*.. 




Tax. and tlnei 


. ..1 n\BiKd 






















1 








































.(KHTlr 



B ntied liy ichool. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 2& 

I'uhlic, Srhool and Hocirly Libraiks in Mii-higan. — CoSTlsUKTi. 



;iilallon , UHil fnr 



. Allnnle EUuler. 






is .... 


800 1 


IS 


M 


W.jL.Coand. 1 












J.CKDlgM. , 

'E.'E.'Meir'iii 


30' 


<':■'■■■ 


■■■■»»■:: 




'"m 




















■■■»T- 


so 
















1 1 i 














30 


M 
























6 


b .... 


MHO .. 






£mp» K Itleber 



2U Lillian Hull 



■at Tcuclier. 



No report to board. 
No report to board. 



No teiiort to toiid. 



No report tn board. 
Vo tejHirt to board. 

No re|K>rl to board. 
No reiwrt to board. 
*■ lorttobvard. 






. ' No trimrt to boari 
. No rcpurt 10 boan 

. ' No report to bmnl. 

No reiiort to bomtd. 











6 »!.... 


io ui 1 too m fV^ l. s^tt. 








,-1 L 



No report to board. 



I Norepoi 



■u board. 



26 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

I'ublic, School and Sociclif Libivrieg in Uichigan. — CONTINUED. 



County, cfl)-, district, 
towpiblp or village. 


i 
1 

1* 


CUis. 




build- 

IDK. 


Support 




Catalogue. 


"ppfP'. 


ies6 


Schwjl 


Both 


Own.. 


Sub. KDd tax. 










"i.al"..'::''.™'' 




.':;:::::::::: 




.'.,"::; 


TM.andflnei 










iilaSII"::;- 


































IMD 


T^W^lp... 


arcalatlDK 


Own.. 


ik^.ii^tlne>.... 




■W to 11 
































»;!!^J;g:J«.::::; 


law 






Own.. 
































































SB... 










igut 














SB... 




























"■Jf^nf^VB., 






i • 




1900 
















lua 




Own.. 
















' 


1 ■ 


































Bronwn, II.S. 


















SBg-ii-"--"'-- 








SISS^SSiDl::::::::; 


IBM j r«e imblle 




Hont.. 




























1901 School Own., 






























School 1 ClrcuLtlng. SB... 
































Cojd-.«.clt, library. 




i 








list) 




Own. 
















































189» 




H B...ISul>«iriptlon 















* Free pulillu and school. A II School bulMlnK- ' TaxaKon, fees and III 



.L'OOgIc 



SECOND AKKUAIj KBPORT. 
Public, School and Society Lilirarics in Michigan. — Costixui 



Vol. 

iheU'ea 
l>w., 

IWl. 


Pam- 

phleu 


Book* 
added 

rear. 


1 


peoded 
booka. 


Clr- llook. 

of refer" 
booki. ence. 


„„„.. 


„„.«. 


■ 


« 






40 1 T 


Ethel nke. 




■3 .MO 








No report to board, 

Ko report to hoard. 
Ko re|)ort to board 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


200 




I. 


ncooo 


B.OOO i MU 


K. P. Clarke. 








:'i 
























»o 






•■"* 




Hre. 0. L. Wright. 
Charlei Ball. 










No reiKirt lo board. 

No report to lioard. 
No report to l>oBrd. 
No report to board. 


40 

luo 








»■ 


U 
1« 




timtgt FrIiUv. 
CoraM, Seabury. 














HUD 
1U> 






MO 




»■ 


IS 


7» 




38 




a 


fha».J. Babc^k. 


No report to hoatd. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report lo board. 
Ko report to board. 

No report to l««rd. 

KorepSnwb^m; 
No report to board. 

No report to boanl. 






















V 


....^ M 






Teacher. 


DO 

M 

SO 








a 








O.W.CleveUDd. 












1 , 








3 




















30 
















^ 




, !"■"" ; 








« 


i» ..,. «6d 


























No reimrtto board. 






13» 








t.KH 


8 1 CO 4.S00 


1,300 








1 




























n 
■at 

1,M0 

u 




M 






Teacher 












NSrepWMblSfd: 

NSIepSrtWboald; 
No report lo boanl, 

Ko report to boanl, 
No report to board. 

No report lo boanl. 








30 .... ^ ie oil 3TB 




Mr>. Emma Caltni. 










ItVl 


lleorgeTrmup. 




4» 














.» 












•i 






A. C. Slokaa. 








8 











































28 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

I'ubiic, School and SocU'ly Libraries in Michigan 



County. oKy.rtlitrlct, 
lomiahiii or village. 


1 

1-* 


CM.. 


UClDg. 


Own 

b"ll<l- 
Ing. 


HupporC 


1 


CatBlogne. 


Rnuich Co.— ran..- 






i 


























IM" 






SB... 


SooiaU 




















j 


1 


^i&EE£ 


im 


School 


Clrculattii|{. Own.. 


Tki. and flnet 


...j Prlnte.1 






School 

Si-hool 


ClroulMlng 




Tax. and line* 
Fee* and fine* 














1 


























IKWI 


LadlM'Ub'y 




Hub.and»n<» 
























IS^S 
















Dog tax. nnet 






























1865 






8«.. 


Snb. and ax. 




Card 


































"ia;.'Sv. 














1 echool 


CireulaClrB.; Own. 
Cln-ulatrng. Own. 

""» i""-^ 

RBlerencB.. Own. 








^^^i^^y 


Fees and nne> 
nu. knd Hniw 


■■„ 




































KiSElSri.^":: 


Social*. Unu. 








j Sfhooi 
















IBW 
































^"'"^' 


*^"' /'*" 
















isHSt*:- 
























fSi 




t n 














Own. 


Taxation 


















l^.joo} 


ClreHiMlSg:; s n"; 












Sulw. j; ano 






























School 


■ Own. 








r!{S|ES:'u:^i.::::- 

































































"> til O O Q 1 L 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Public, Hchmil and /iucirly I.iliiariis in ilichii/ai 



■helve* 
Dec.. 

19*1. 




5? 


1 

i 


Ex 
penned 
during 

SL 


Clr- 
culBtlon 

book.. 


iisen for 
ence. 


.b™r..n. 


Remarks. 








1 








































No report to board 






7 




»! 110 




Teacher. 






So report to board 
So report to boanl 
So report to boanl. 


-0 










m 


". 


*? 


3 ii ' in » 








Ifi ; IB 


r. p. Maun. 
Con Uenlum. 














So report to board 
So report to boar.1 
So reiwrt tn board 


























3D 


2 


MOO 




Mrs. Kelle Dnve. 
8, B. Corbln. 


















»0,„„„.„„ 


so 


!0 


1» 




, 


W. W. cj»tea. 














00 








So report to board 
No report to boarci 






John iUllow. 






Grape M. Giine. 






m 






So reijort to board 


















J, K. King. 

MlnnleJ.Elll.. 

Job H«genu«n, 






"■:^' 


8G 8 


37 W 1 6.1M 
2M OU -M 
















W 












400 




Ain A. Carpenter. 
Walter C.P«lniet. 


























6H3 
11 






So report to board 








Florence Hughwn. 






Xo (Bport to l«ard 














V4 ; M 


J«..H.E»er. 






.... 


30 


















'1 






No report to bmril 
So report til boanl 









j^ 




1 


HIM Lannoar, 
John i). Vtiytn. 




w 




V-;' "" 


No report to board 




' 






A. E. Thayer. 










: j 


1 


V r* ttobo d 




".'.Z'. 


£3 




So reiHirt to board 










R'A%^h?"- 




35 


— : ; 


















1 




w 










i 


NoreiKiri to board 



LIBBABY COUMISSIOMEBS. 
Public, Srhoot and Soeielp Libraries in Michigan. — CONTINUED. 



<s»,i'Sv"irs? 


1 

11 


CIM.. 


] Own 




1 


Caulogue. 


lUhonn Co.— Con j 
















IWffl 


EKf.'.':;: 


aaSSriiii::. 










Sul>.uidfinN 
















into 


School 












1 B 
































































1 






186D 


Bohool 


ClTCuUttnK! SB.. 




































Bcbool 


........... 










EnMoTd.p 7 




SB::;:: 








li'SJ'.'^^T.?; o4ii:! 


rob".id"tii! 














19OT 


Bchool ...... 


ClreoliHng.iOwn.. 




































K^^SSitg-l": ■:: 


1«B 

INB 


I 








ISSSl :::::: 


Reforance.. Own.. 
























^'"*°' 






































1888 


Lkdiis'iib'y 


CIreutating.lOwn.. 


Si]b.uidflnM,.... 












gSI:'::: 

Scbool 


ffisa-r-- 




















MM 








USsi';;;:-;;-;; 


ClrcnlktiDS.i itsn't.. 














siliBj:;:;:::;:; 


iiae 


School 

Scboot 




Ft 






Tuc. Knd anei 








SSiVE!! 


IMB 


Scbool"!!'! 


circulattHK, SB... 








Sub. and Unas 
















W§9 


Sdiooi 


circDi'uUl^.| SB... 


















isas 




















%ir^n"-.;'?.'"'°"'' 


188B 


Pabllo ach'l 


B0«. IrB... 


























I«9» 
























1M6 


School ClccntoUDg.l 




















School 






















18M 


Sfihool 


cirealiti^.jOwn.. 






■■(■•:;--;;'-i;vi;> 



S II School bulIdlDg. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPOET. 31i 

Public, School and Bocifly Libraries in Michigan. — COSTISUED. 



Vol- ■ FaiD- 

1«.. , ««. 


Booka 


. 


5|S 

booki. 


Clr- Book! 

oulatlon need (or 

or ; Tttti- 


Librarian. 


Remark*. 


wo 












No report to board. 










ito 




O. W. FllDt. 
Wm. Doollttle. 

Mra. H.J. Enoa. 




1 


































U 




•7 00 


100 






27 






No report to board. 












Elmer DilDO. 












No report lo board. 
No report to board. 


































1 




B 




Walter Scott. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 






1 


















F. 8. Knapp. 












1 
















No report to board- 














S:Sk»^. 


TS 


* 


12 




600 


4t 


T6 


No report to board . 






20 










IdaRocco. 












SSPSSK: 




3" 


a 






















O.M.Gieawm. 














No report to board. 










aoo 
























I 






17 
















No report to board. 






m 










Florence Riggs. 












No report to boaid. 






























No report lo board. 




!!!""! 




woo 


1,440 




aara A. Wortblustou. 




38 












20 Ta 






S. W. Clark. 














^ 




2S 














4» 


ii2 


38 


No report to board. 




4* 


3 










Tucber. 
















"S 










So report to board. 






300 






Teacher. 










loo 












No report to board. 
















Teacher. 






' 










No«i«rtloboard. 








30 


4B 


Albert Lohr. 












No report lo board. 


^..m 


100 

i' 


" 


.^i '*S 


4,S2B 


•••s 


Oertrade B. Smltb. 








No report to boar.U 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 








HenrjE-Fnaciico. 




1 








1 




J.C.Ca». 








n 




S ....' 276 


30 2B 


A. F. Bfrd. 










Haul Roe. 













,L.ooglc 



UBRART OOUMISSIONER8. 

•ol 'Uiil Soi-irlff l.ibrarifK in Miehi-inn.— 



"tr-'ji^'s- .iiss'' 


i 
1= 


aati. 


Reference 


Own 
bulld- 


Support. 


_ 


Cattlogue. 


■Cklboiin Cn— foB..- 


1 










iibeTiilan. 1>,2. 


1890 






S B.,. 


SulMcripMon. 














RetercDce.. 

Clrcalatlng 


Own.. 












Tow„,hip... 


















Tek..[Hh». n.BH 


1882 












^"^^y-i^T-l 
















:::::.;::::::::: 






.'•"**•»'-:::: 




Own .- 












1 , 






r»lvfn.l>.» 

OM«>|wl!».V 








FeeaauiltliieB 








iib: 








liMIlnn 
































L*nr.4'.l;-»fl 


\m 






Own.. 


Sub.andAuM 
























«■■■»">"' 




















ilrcui«Mns. 

















Newherg, It.'i 


1 I 


1 
.. Both ; Own. 




s:;£:^-!;-S3 ■ 


. [ 1890 Hvliool... 


..iCrcnUtlng.jown. 










Fenn.D.l 


School... 


. CIrcutating,' • 

1 


Fine* 






peniii'i\.!!!;"iii!!!"! '.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.' \"y/^v^i\vx.\v//^y.''.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.\ !!!;;::!!!!;!!!•:: 













-^ 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Society Librariea in Michigan. — CONTINDED. 



Vol- Ptan- 
nmei pbleti 

■belvaa ahelvee 

I 


dar- 


i 


as 


CUUttOD 

bo^ke. 


Book, 
refer. 

■DCS. 


u,^. 


Bemarka. 






1 












No report W board. 








36 


SO 


BathFeckbam. 








No report lo board. 




1 


87 




17 00 


10 

160 




Inei V. Hoft. 
Mre. Eva Qeroir. 


















No report (o board. 
















ri^piiiman. 






fie 










No report to board. 














1 






























No report to board. 




























No report to board. 
No report u> board. 
































". 




MOO 


1,000 




Barafa Price. 
















M 


00 


Vema JiiM.. ' 














No report to board. 
















CharleaHanaoii. 






10 










No report to board. 










40 


CH-KlmoiBHe. 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 
































H. Bipler. 
















No report lo board. 














» 


Gage Lewie. 














No report to board 

No repert to board. 
.No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 






















» 




























i 




























30 

i 




































































2 






















Martin Oebbard. 






A 










nSJ^mw board! 






























1 




100 






Anna Norton. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















I 
















400 






C.L.tileawin. 








No report to board. 
No report to board! 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to boaril! 






40 
























































































































































' 


liu^ 



34 LIBRARY C0UMI6SI0KERS. 

Public, School and Society Librariea in Michigan. — Coynnvt^. 



■gaiS'SSK? 


1 
■s 


CtoM. 


•USiT- 


Own 

buUd- 
Ing. 


• Support. 


1 


CatBlogno. 


"^o^roT-: 


















1S8B 












































































im 


Soliool 


Both 


SB.... 


T«. BDd anca 














IMl 


Scbool 


CircnlatlDg 












SB... 
























'iwe' 
















School 


ClrcnUtlDi 


Own.. 




































































School 


R«larene«.. 






































^iZ^^l'ktt::. 


lew 

IBM 


SSS:::::: 

Townibip... 

Sahool 

School 


as."!'""' 

ClroQUtlDK 


SS:;:; 

ReDt.. 


Di«lrlctbo»rd 
•na. >nd anas 
























IRM 


Own- 


















■;•"■ 






Own.. 


Sob. mad Tu. 










arcuUdDK 
































































































D a 
















KSag;.*::::::: 
































-aSs/i-r^ .-, 


School 




8B.... 




































1893 












































"ite:".j°^ 


ItSB 






Own.. 


















































1888 


To ihl 




Rent! 








S'B^?^-'---- 


Fro* palliic 


ClrcQlatlDE. 


1ki.»ndflnw 




Printed. 




1880 


S^h^i 






































































r 1 


^■OOQ Ic 



S B School building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 35 

/*uM»c, School and Society lAbrarica in Michigan.— Costi^vud. 



Vol- Fim- 
amt, . puata 

■balvei ibelvei 
Dec., Dec., 

""■ 1 '"'■ 


dor. 




Ex- 

books. 


euSSo. 
of 

booki. 


Books 
DUd for 


Librarian. 


Bemarks. 


30 
50 
































No report to board. 




I 




•100 


S 




llrs.Lor»lneThoma». 
C. C. Parker. 


26 












No report to board. 




86 


























is 




IB 00 


4G 


St 


J. U. Cnlllrume. 






No report to board. 




1 




11 n 

2 -a 






W. J. Oarrett. 
H. A.Cr06O. 


■ 




BO 




fS 






No report to board. 














iA"SS;.. 












30 






3 








No report to board. 


z 












i 

3S 
30 








































li 


Jetse 3. Greece. 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 
























80D 


ao 


Q. E. Hlnes. 
Hubert E. Bell. 
JoelJohnstoii, ■ 




221 

200 


..* 


sss 










n 










13 




500 




« 






No report to board. 












TO 


Teacher - 

Mrs. Roaina atnw. 




11 




R«8 


100 










No report to board. 




















































S"KSis:s- 


















a,wo 
















No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

So report to board. 
No report to board. 




















W 




































Mt 


100 


» 


3 


10 00 


soo 


soo 


B. A. Howud. 




















B 












Richard Lewis. 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 


















ra 




23 




12 n 


40 


40 


VInceDt Adams. 
































2000 


1 
31 


"l 


2M 


toe 




S.VM.tt,«,.. 


■•i 










No report to board. 












I. H. Buck. 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















3 









































LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
I'ublic, School and Bocitly Librariei in Michigan. — Contjmted. 







'^jrz 


CiroQlaUnp. 






































ISM 






Own.. 
Own.. 


FeeiandflDra 




P-t^diidcinl.. 




































1001 




Both 


SB... 
BB... 


^gSS'f 
























IHW 




























































CWty«™Co.^ 


















































































1893 


To 




RBnt. 




































































SanltSM. MftTla.D.aa. 
















































1900 




Circulating. 


































































































IBOl 

1W» 

law 


£!»;::::: 


ReferaDOe.. 












SB... 








SSII;;:::;;::; 
































D 
































































CUntODCo.: 












































































































































































































".tIp" 



S B BcbDOl bulltltiiK. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Sociely Libraries in Michigan. — Contisl'ed. 



Vol- 

•helve* 
Dec.. 
um. 


■helTe* 

IieE., 


Book* 
added 
dnr- 

IBB 


1 


Ex- 
pended 

11 


oDiatioii 
of 


Books 


Ubiartan. 


,.^«.. 












BO 


E.J.Bmttb. 
JOMph Truedow. 








60 

S 

30 
S3 


















No report to board. 


















10 00 




24 


H. T. Myers. 
Helen Bamlcb. 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















B 


SIS 






J-S^S."^""""- 


















No report to board. 

No report (o board. 
No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


» 




30 
30 




































































T 




























3S 




















IS 


Mn. Henrr Gatiier. 






7S 
S3 








No report lo board. 
NSJ^SrtW board! 

No «p^W board! 


























m 

M 

M 

2([t 
























































No report to board. 


■ 






soo 




A.J.LMy. 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
So report to boM^. 

No report to board. 




1! 

36 




































£ 

31 

n 

7B 
U 

m 

M 


























I>. D. little. 
John Beck. 
B. A. Green. 

Teacber. 








31 












10 







n 




10 BO 












28 












No reiiortlo board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 








































M 




















3b1 






1 




n 
















1 

< 
U 










IpSsS: 

No report to board! 














































































































' """*" *"■ 



38 LIBRARY COUMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Society lAhrariet in Michigan. — Cosnsvat. 



township « vlll«g«.' 


































































































































































































































































S:Sa::S:;:::::::::: 
















































































































































































1IW7 


Townrtilp... 






IM >Dd mb.. 


















































































































































































































































































































































1 




























































1 






































^''""•"■^ 














tc;ooi-3"tc"' 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Society Librariea in iltehigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 


Deo„ 


dOf 


1 


Ex- 

for 
book). 


Cir- 
cnlatloD 

bci^ki. 


Boolu 


LlbnrUn. 


Bemarka. 






80 












No "pSrtW board! 
No report to board. 
Nor^rttoboard. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















3 
























































































40 












No report to boajd. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















n 




























20 






















No'^^orlgS 

No report to board. 

No "£Srt£ hoard! 
No report to board. 

No report to board- 






11 














1 


































n 




















a 




3U 




1 














No report to board.' 
No report w board! 






11 




























1 










' 17 










Norei«rttoboard. 
















l« 




HOOO 4M 




NetUe B. Lowe. 








No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















S 
















































1 




1 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 

ffi;iff£M: 

No report to board. 

No report to board'. 
No report to board; 
























s 
















46 










































M 












































26 








































No report to hoard. 






















IB 
























No report to board. 

No report to hoard! 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

nS report to b^: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

■ CiOO'ilC 


































3S 
10 




































































40 





























., 









40 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Publie, School and SoeUly lAbrariet m Mit^igoin. — Coktdiced. 



JiSS;S:S.':::::::::: 
















Victar.D.S 

yiMOT,D.B. 
































































































■Watertown D B 
































































































































C™wtor,l Co. : 
Be»yerC™lt,D.l 
















Beaver Cnek.D.S.... 


































iten 






Own.. 


Tu. ana flnei 


































1BS8 














































































I«»S 






S^-.: 


Tai. and floes 










Clroalatlng. 








1886 








DelttCo.i 


School 


CircnlatlDB. 
























.!'*'. 

































Free public 


cSS,taa.i: 


RenL. 










'iiw' 


lU. and One* 




















































DloWnK.DCo.: 


1S9T 


School 


P.f«re„o- 


SB... 

Own.. 
Own.. 


School boaid. 














1888 

ISW 

18*; 


TownshlD 




^^ 




sab: 

School 


ilTh""^""^; 

BoUi 








Norway, pobllc acfiool. 
Norway, Floe Creek 


Tia.. and flnei 


D. 


F't'd and oard.. 


































IBM 


School 


aTcnIatlDg. 


SB... 


E.,.™.... 




Written 

l.ooQie 





I Taiation, fee* and Bnea. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Publio, School and Society Libraries in MichigaH. — Continued. 



Vol- 


Pam- 
pblen 


dor- 


1 


durtDg 
year 


cuIatloD 

of 
book!. 


reter- 


Librarian. 


Eemarto. 






, 












N) report to board. 
No report to board. 
N 1 report to board. 
N 3 report to board. 
M report to board. 

No report to board. 
N 3 report to board. 


















n 




















































.: 




































N 1 report to board. 

N J report to board. 
Vo report to board. 
N 3 report to board. 
Mr«lH>rt to board. 

N J report to board. 


















1 








































































































13 












Sore^Srt to board. 

S i report to board, 
^ D report to board. 


, 












1 

11 
m 

IM 












































N 3 report to board. 
N D report to board. 
























6B 


68 












NjrepOTt to board. 




107 




















Jobb O. Stepban. 
















N » report to board. 

N J report to board. 
Ni report to board. 
^ J report to board. 


















































106 




10 




to 00 


10 
M 


10 


A. L. Benw. 










































S > report to board. 




300 


13 




lere 




200 








S report to board. 
N a report to board. 






no 












i.m 


,.'. 


300 00 
30 00 






^s-.^M7,r^K. 




















M 










> tt report to bo^- 




























W 

M 

■■"'ioo' 


» 


.: 


12 00 






Dama Winalow. 
Hra. L. Price. 

Margaret HcVety. 
E. P. Fmil. 

iixj C. Howard. 


m 


2S0 

10, ae 
b\m 

40 


1 






""SM 
SO 

aa" 


.??. 










0»!G 
00 00 






1,100 












No report to board. 
No report to boud. 
















S8 






.« 






Zaidee I. Bovee. 















42 UBRART COMmSSIONBRS. 

Public, School and Hocielj/ Librariet in iticKigan. — Contikued. 



'=Si,;'S3!S;- 


1 

1 


CUu. 


"iVi'S"- 


Own 

bis. 

log. 


Support., 




catalogue. 


















































!i! 


Sc'liaai 

School 


SSSSSI: 


n-:: 


ISSK 






Bellevoe,D.4fl 


5^ti^: ::::::: 




































vm 






SB... 
SB... 


i:k?s 












































































law 


Bcbool 

School 


CIrcaliktiDg 
Both 


Own.. 
Own.. 








g^Sgl^iBI:::::::: 


Tax.ftndBnu 




WtUWn 




















ixee 


Sehool 


Cireutatlng. 


Oir^.. 


TiLandanei 


























^ 




1H98 






Own.. 




































ISM 


School 


CircDtating, 


SB... 
























• 






















































189« 


School 


Rafertnce.. 


8Z:: 


Bj^riPMo" 




























Own.. 


Fe« and lines 


.... 
















i 


Sohoo 

Scboo 

SZ :::::: 


CircuUUiie. 
Circulating. 


owii:: 

Own.. 
Own.. 


School dist... 




























School 


CIrcuUtliig. 
CIrcDUUng. 


















tlt9E 


School:::::: 


CIrculktInK. 
CIccuUtlDg. 


Own.. 
Own.. 








































SMt;:;;;;:;; 


















ie» 


School 


ClrCQUilDg. 


SB... 


Tuution 




























im 


School 
























1897 


School 


EeVerence,. Own.. 


















!»»> 


TOWMhip... 










Printed 




























.«« 




































rialV" 



SB School balldlag. 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPORT. 43 

Public, School and Society Libraries •» Michigan. — Co:TTianED, 



Tol. 

IMl. 


PMl- 
pbKII 


Books 
added 

IS 


1 


Br. 
penOed 

i: 


'± 


Books 


Librarian. 


Renurka. 






n 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















10 
















ss 




«i 


s^Ksir'- 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















































Principal of school. 






























No report lo board. 




















41 

6 
























"! 


.... 


10 00 
1100 


78 


TO 


A..H.wmiami. 






















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
Ko report to board. 


a 






BBO 


BO 


00 


Henry McDonald. 


















BOO 


BO 
























■^ 




11 00 


BO 




T.J.BI10W. 








».^,.»b..M. 






ai 










Joseph Horn. 










No report to board. 






n 
























No report to board. 






BBO 






Mrg.Blan^e Hojer. 




» 


B6 


IIG 








10 00 

«ooo 




'■■s 


BBO 






No report to board. 




, 


8 




800 


«. 




Artbar H. Holly. 
C. Pnnk WelU. 
Teacher. 
Teacber. 
J. L. Cuplt. 

Henry PerklnB. 




























a 




300 














































No report to board. 












M 




8. W. Hawn. 
H. 0. Rtley. 




is 


1 




















No report lo board. 

nS report W board! 
No report to board. 




























































n 




Teacher. 






I 








No report to board, 
























28 


US 


C. A. Uotock. 






» 


10 

zo 








» 


BOO 






Mlw rickworth. 














I 


31 




ZI44 


sse 




EliiabethJ. Rogera. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















2S 










«0 


C.N. Leedy. 












No report to board. 

Uoo'j e 















r 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — CaaniruED. 



"3X'S,T■SS^ 


i 
1 


ClM«. 


Refereoce 

or olron- 


Own 
b'JlM- 

iDg, 


Snpport. 




Canlogne. 


BBlon Co.— Con..- 
































































































law 


S«l"x»l 


CfrcnUtlng. 


Own.. 


























































. 


























































































iSSa :::::: 














19M 




Own.. 


SobMripUou. 












































1896 


Scbool 




SB... 


















ISM 


Kl :::::: 

School 




iyHu. 










lU. ud fines 








II::: 




















































1X.0 


Bchool 




Own., 


















































1900 


Scbool 

Tonnrtilp... 


CIroutattoB 


Own.. 
Bent.. 




























































18SS 


Tomwhlp... 












EmmMCo.; 









































































































































































































































































































B B Scbool building. 



SECOND ANKTJAL EBPORT. 45 

Pubtio, Bohool and Society lAbrariea in Miohigan. — Continuto. 



S: 




Book* 


J 


Ex- 

boSka. 


'± 


"1" 


Ubrutao. 


H«^... 






» 
























No report to board. 
No report to board. 






30 








































No report to board. 
No report to board. 




i 


3? 






















Flan lADkbHi. 












No report to board. 
















E.J. MoMnllen. 
















No report to board. 







S 




























36 
XI 

9 
30 












No report to board! 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 








































2 








Oeoree UcCaroar. 
H. M. Onlel. 






3* 


3* 








ID 






































No report to board. 




» 


B 










liiiiMJ. iialett. 












No report to board. 




< 


' 




HO 00 


07 




K.B. Hammond. 




07 








SO 




II Bl 
TOO 




» 


33 


sa 


















No report to board. 






















T 
T 




sto 




3T 


A.T.Bri8bani. 






No report to board. 
No report lo board. 


























1» 




* 




80 00 


3»0 


i» 


J. F. Frace. 
George W. Dairii. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


























7» 




I 




4SS4 


SDO 


600 


Ida M. Gregory. 






























































No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report CO board. 
No report lo board. 






































1 




























36 












































W 












Norei«^tob™rd. 






























No report to board. 


















































NS«pSrttobS!rd; 






10 



























46 LIBRARY COHHISSIONEBS. 

Public, School and Soeieij/ lAbrarica in Michigan. — Cohtinukd. 



'S"^^.fo''rvtiSS!- 


•s 

It 


! 

CUM. ^ Oj^Cj^CU. 


Own 
rent 


Support. 


1 


CkUlogne. 


^USls:?™:: 






































































1 


1 


























































1 






































































' 
























































j 






















































IBM' 


School ClrCDlMlDg 


SB... 
























































Own.. 




































isoe 




bWii.. 




















1900 

ISTB 
187T 


- ' 


Own.. 

Own.. 


^Untlon 

9ub.udfeoi 
Foes & nnea.. 




Wrttton 


*S^:'^'^'^' 


LuliM-llb'; CIrcaUtlQg 
LullM'llb'f CltcolaUDg 


Wrttton 


S^^^^-.e'r.' 






































































































































































School 


Clrcnlttlng. 


SB... 








sSiBlii;::;:;:: 














School 


Both 


SB,.. 






























































































C i-*i-*nl,> 



8 B School boUding. 



SBCOHD ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — CONTINUED, 



Tol- Pam- 
■ime* pblett 

■b«Kaaebel°eB 
Dec, Dec., 


dar- 
ing 
year. 


1 


El- 

d urine 
year 

for 


ClT. 


Books 
refer- 


LIbrarUn. 


Remark*. 


1 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 




















































1 






















































X 


































X 






















No report to board. 






























30 










nS report to board! 

No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 














1 








































40 
30 












j 




tlBOO 


160 




Andrew B.8tlff. 
James McCaagbna. 


















No report to board. 


















31 

30 
W 












-.1 ' ' 




.00 
















No report to board. 












A. 8. Wheelock. 


X 




19T 






No report to board. 


; 


■■.■ 


30 00 
WOO 






Mra. Geo. Tltsoortb. 
Mri. Alice Campbell. 


,Zl:z 


450 

1,000 
















No report to board! 
































30 












No report Inboard. 
No report to board. 

No report lo board. 






















































No report to bMTd. 


















<0 
ST 












No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

nS report W board! 


«i 
























M* 


1 

< 




w 


uo 


140 


Edmund CalklDi. 














n 1 7S 
























li-SSft 





















































48 UBBABT COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, Behool and Society Libraries in Michigan. — CoxiIMUED. 





18TO 


k:sse 


asi-ii-i 


Own.. 
Own.. 






■fttoiid.:::::::: 




■action 


D. 


























Bohool 


ClTculMing 


<""■■ 


Sab.iud Ux. 
















UW 


School 


Ciiiiittne-' 




















Bcbool 


CiTCUlktiDg 

SlUSSiS 


Own.. 
Own.. 


T.x»Hon. ... 








ISW 
































































PliUhlDg.D. fl 


im 


School 


ctiutotliiB,l 










































S'S».?-."."::::::: 


IBM 


School 

School 


apcutatlng 


Own.. 


1kx.>iiclflnei 
Iks. and don. 




Written 










1M9 
IBM 


School 


Clrculiling 


Own.. 

Own.. 




























ClrcDhitliig. 


Own., 
















































0„.. 


Tu.iindanN 




Printed 








1KB6 
I88S 






SB... 

Own.. 












CIrcaUtlDg. 

































UK 


School 


anialatliig. 


SB... 




















School 


gRSSSf: 












IBM 


Own.. 
SB... 








































































1 










I9W 


School 


Reference . 


SB... 


Tiii. and flues 














1TO7 


School 


arcnUtlng 


6i^.. 
















Montro»e D fi 


















IMS 


School 


ClTCnlfttiiiB 






















IWT 


School 






















Mt M rrii D II 








SB 
























Mamtj-;D.2.. 

Mundy.B.Sfl 

Hundy, D.4fl 


?. 


Free public. 

School 


gESSf 


'o^:. 


Sab.aDdaDes 
Snb.andSneB 











SB Bcbool building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Bodcty LibrarUi in Michigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 


■€;.r 


Sook> 
■liir- 
jear. 




pended 


book!. 


Books 


Librarian. 


Remarka. 


















No report to board. 




IS 

3» 
M 
24 

SI 
11 


..*. 


nooeo 


ooo 
12,382 




Helen L. Wood. 
Lena E. Caldwell. 




«W 








Ho report to board. 
Norepocl to board. 
























Eugene Brookray. 












No report (o board. 












ibe.CIi^eDceBc^mer. 












No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report tn board. 


-3 


'ij' 




a: 


Ml 
20 


R.W.Tupper. 

Geo. N. nraham. 
JoDDleCbarletwortb. 






10 

s 

u 






















Johnp.Banaom. 












No report to board. 

No report (o board! 
No report to board. 


» 




eoo 


BO 


« 


Joeepb BfowD. 


























V 




« 




T»0 


13 


30 


M-Ste"' 






No report (o board. 




- M 


■ 






100 


100 

n 


Jae. w. Miner. 
Lrdbi Wendt. 












b' 


3» 




»0« 














14 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 




M 


















17 M 


400 




j„,»n™.. 






No report to board. 






BOO 




30 


srs.rs.,. 


















No report to board. 
















3> 


M> 




8M 






Fnnk K. Hill. 








No report to board. 


M 




'" 


29 


2S 


Wm. T. Elce, 
Lee C. Perry, 












No report to boant! 






> 








































No report lo board. 






M 












S 












•la report to board. 




is' 


s 




300 




« 


Ju]laA.InKham. 






Ni report lo board. 




• 


....1 












> 




EmniT Cninklis. 






N) report to board. 




2 


33i 






w.H.Qiiiett.- 








No report to board. 














liwrcnce Faiucb. 














Nd report to bo«rd. 






8> 


2200 


SO 




John HUt. 
B. O. Scholia;. 




t» 








N} report to board. 



















.Google 



50 LIBRARY COHMISBIONERS. 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Continued. 





ISBS 


B^iiHi :.:::: 


CtrcolntlDg 


Own.. 


Taxation.... 




























lesT 


School 


ClrcutoMUB 




















1(08 


School 


Circnlatlng 




TucandllDei 






























18M 


^'™' jOrcul^tlnB 


Own.. 


















1SK 


Bahooi 1 cimniating 

School 1 CIrcalatlUB 


0«D.. 

Own.. 










T»x. Mill fine* 














IRM 
IBM 


Bahooi...... rarcu^tl'ng 




Ita-udfinw 








OWD.. 

Own.. 








R§h~i :::::: 


2S"l'"."f 






























1B8G 


Sol""' 


Clrcniatl'BB 




Owii'.: 

Own.. 
Own.. 
















OladiriD Co. : 


lenG 






SabBcrlptton 








Free public 


CIrouUttai 












































































IlttW 






S B... 






































18W 




Clrontatliie 


Own.. 






































IWB 






Rent. 


SobBcriptton . 
Tufttlon 








Froo public. 


Both 


Vrlnted 




1880 












































OnuiaTniyeraeCo.: 































































































gISSg'g-! 










:■::::::::;::::. 










































































































































1 


r'-; 




t ,0(HT"lr 



















8 B School ballding. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 51 

Public, Bchool and BoeUiy Lihrariet in Michigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 

■£"• 

ism'.' 


Fam- 
pblen 

a" 


Boofee 
added 

?;,'■ 

jear. 




peoded 
dnrtDE 


Clr. 

eulatloD 

iK^kl. 


reler- 

enoe. 


UbTArian. 


Bemarkl. 


















Ko report to board. 






T 




tow 


20 




Hattie Montgomerr. 






No report to board. 






















1 






los 




H.E. Allen. 












No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 


101 




i 




800 


ioo 


100 


Daolel HUea. 




















10 


10 


W.A.aarob. 






31 

i 

1 












IS 


a 




J. J. Hill. 




S6 


8 


No report to board. 




'^^ 


BOO 

4W 

BOO 

aooo 






.leule Rlebardi. 
W. K. Bargent. 




32 












2K 


IM 


30 


NO report to board. 




2 


2M 
XDO 

10 00 


8! 




W. B. Wadtmorlh. 
C. W. HuDBell. 

WUliam Q«uld. 
Sarali A. Kennedy. 
















TT 


SO 


TO 


No report to board. 


































No report to board. 




































!3 


H 






23 


Jame* Wagar. 










No report to boMd. 
No report to board. 




















1 








Uaad Parker. 




S 






IW 


1 






io2 .... 


00 00 










No report to board. 












« 


W. S. Bergman. 
Cairle A. Da via. 




....™ 




80 00 


47B 




i;SS 


3IU 






No report to board. 










nariMa E. Mace, 






to 










No^r^SSTrl!' 


























































No report to board. 






















10 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 














































I 
























No report to board. 
















































































NSrepSrtw board; 

■ iiiioIp 
























' ' 



52 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

I'ublic, School and Society Libraries in Uichiifan. — Costinctek, 



"SSSSffiS' 


It 


Ctou. 


Beference 

UtiDg. 


Own 

rant 
build. 

log. 


Support. 




Otalosoe- 


Od. TnTers* Co.— Con.; 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ijiESII:;;:;; 

































^I^J^B-ifl 


u» 


School 




Own.. 


Tu. ftUd flDM 












IBM 


School 


Clrontatlne. 


Own.. 




















School 


ClriuUttng- 


SB... 
Own.. 










IBM 


































18W 


Ijlissi 


»"«" 


S B... 
SB... 


Tu.and Hum 
Tu.udflnei 






BBtb»nJ;D.2.,: 




























1890 


Sohool 


Both 


Own.. 
































































|£:g:!:::::::;;::::;; 


IBOT 


School 




Own.. 














£&!:::;:::::;::::; 


IMO 


siiiool 


CiiruUtlDg. 


Own.. 
















































8W 


School 


ClrcutaltoK. 


sii... 


















fichool 














3B...| Sub-aadfoM 

















LiOOQlC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 53 . 

Public, School and Socielj/ Libi-aritt in Michigan. — Continued. 



Dec., 
ixn. 


pbl«W 
■beUe* 
Deo., 


dnr- 


J 


Ex- 
book!. 


»gs.. 


„Mr 
reter- 


Librarian. 


Ramarki. 


















No report to board 
No report to board 






















7ft 
























No report to boanl 
No repon to board 

No report to board 






IB 
























































































report to board 
o report to board 
o report to board 
o report to board 

No report to board 

No report to board 

No report to board 

nSJSpSm to board 
No report to board 

No report to board 

No report to board 
No report to boRrd 
No report to b<*rd 

No report to board 
No report to board 
No report to board 
No report to board 






















J 
























































a 




























































































100 




















































* 






















































































>.M 


UO 


30 
11 


B 




>3£ 




Edward Wllaon. 






No report to board 




.... 


no DO 






Wm. E. Beverlj. 








No report to board 






n 




I2S 






Ladle Held. 
















NSrafSrttoboa^ 




















W 




^S^"- 






2 




300 


30 








SSf^rttoboari 

No report to board 
No report to board 

No report to boari 




















30 


10 


Bewte CommingB. 












1 

1 








































WOO 




ta 


M. K. Fuller. 






No report to board 






000 




w 


W. K. Campell. 










i 


1 

'! 










































a 








n 


T 








12 












i(i()i;|r 



LIBRARY COMUISSIONER3. 
Public, School and Soeietg Librariea in Michigan. — CotinsDED. 



'SSi,SZ-SS^ 


I-" 


Claw- 


Reference 
or olrcD- 
latlDg. 


OWD 

bnlld- 
ing. 




i 


Catalogue. 


GntlotCo.— con.; 


1864 


Soheol 


ClrculattUB. 


Owa'.'. 


Boclali, Bdm. 
'nnM!!'.!!!!:: 




StoTW" 






MKy:;:;:::;;:i: 




aii'hiiV.'.!!" 


circular Df! 






■r. 








ililii;::;::;::;; 










18M 






sb!!! 

Own*.! 
9B... 










School 


Bott 

ClrculaUiiK. 

'Both',*.!!!!!' 
ClrontatlaK. 
















rinee 






^ 




SDb! and ail ei 
SDb.aDdBDei 










^^E:}\ 


























Clrcolattiig 
ClrcuIatlHg 
















SS|g: !;::::::::;:: 


'dwii '.. 

II::: 

'iim'.'. 


'nation!!!'! 
lU. and Ones 
aah.aadflDU 




illtl-: 


'^^ 


*Bchooi'." 

BchMi :;::;. 
School 

School 








im 






l:p|i;E 


Flnei 






















SSej;:;;;: 
















SSaiS:!:::::: 
















BS^iE: 


School 

'school'.)!!! 


arciiiaitng 


SB.'.'. 


Sub. and Due* 

'Flnei:::;!!::! 






iiili :■ 




'cireiiiaaDg 


%i^: 




























iSli:-: 


iws 


£S3::;:: 





'oWn! 


K:::::::: 







S B School building. 



L.,.iz.i..:>L.OO'^[ C 



8K00ND ANNUAL BEPOET. 55 

Public, Behaol and Booietj/ Lihrariet t» Uuihigtut. — Contikded. 



Vol- 


as: 


year. 


j 


bo^La. 


cir- 
culation 

booka. 


Book! 

reler- 
ence. 


.»^. 


Remarks. 












» 




Teacber. 








31 








iiSgssS.- 






























now 






JOMpb KeUogK- 


12 






No report to board. 


IW 


1 


a 




ID DO 


e 


108 


L.K.HOM. 






1 












No report to board. 


























s 


T 


33 80 


i? 


S 


8. P. Flno. 
Albert p. Cook. . 








Bi 






No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


M7 





a) 
11 




iiz M 


» 


F. H. Feet. 


















fl 




Hrt.JaiieOu1ick. 
Lena Ney. 




30 




10 00 












NorepSrtWboaEd; 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

NS"p^«Mboart; 
No report to board. 






. » 




















































10 

1 






























































i 


'1 


.... 






Andrew Cowell. 
Robert McNabb. 
LoalM Uayet. 

O.H.Daan. 
H. 8. Etaenlord. 






"• 












2S 








i 


DO 








'i 






IB 










No report to board] 
No report to boaPd. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report lohoarrt. 
























a 




1 




































' 
























No report to board. 






. 




800 






Charlei A. l^um. 






















40 


Diilrlct board. 








1 

7 










N 




BDO 


w 


M 


Simon Munaon. 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























» 


6 

T 




IN 




S8 


j:r.£,r"" 
























NftaeCarmef.' 




S 




ii in'] im 








No report to board. 
So report to board. 

'OiJlC 




10 








_. 


' 1 





56 LIBRARY COHMIBSIONERB. 

Public, School and Society Librariea in Michigan. — CotmNOEB, 



'2»,?S»S;!' 


1 

1 

it 


Clftw. 


\s^- 


Own 
hS. 


Sppport. 


1 




GiMlDtCo^CtHi..-' 


ISSE 


Bcbool 




8 B... 
SB... 








PeuudflDM 
































S^LSW'." :::::: 








6^., 


Dan.BndBnea 
































































Bobool 


Both 


Own.. 

Own.. 
Own.. 


PMiandflnM 








ISTB 








ISbJSl:;:;:: 


CItcnUtlnc. 


TM.uulflaM 






























UM 






Own.. 






















18»(l 
1§9B 
UM 


ISESS!:;:::: 


g^ffis:! 


SB... 

IS::: 










?Si522'" 


































sffiiSlii-- 


leee 


School 


O^Uti'i^' 


SB.., 
















































































UOD 


Bcbool 


Clrcatatlng. 


SB... 


r^. andilDM 






























leas 






8S:: 


FiuM.<£«ax 








































ISH 


Bohool 


ClrcxUUiic. 










"li52,':'g:i 














































































School 

School 


ClrcaUuSI 


Own.. 










iwn 
































































































WTO 


Bithiii 1 cireiiitlng. 






























































































i 












18W 
UM 


Bobooi Retctencc. 


Own.- 


EnWrMnm'n 





































LiOOgIC 



BECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 57 

Pullie, School and Society Librariea in Michigan. — Contikded. 



omei 




35S 


1 


boolu. 


Cir- 
cDlatloti 


Books 

refer^' 
ence. 


Librarian. 


Remark!. 




" "i«o' 


1 
10 

» 




SS 






E. W. Qlb«oii. 
BUa B. Andrew!. 


















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















IB 






300 


H. W. Danlell. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 








































No report to board. 




»' 


3 

I 

H 




10 00 

12* 






R. M. Miller. 










43 


» 


M 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 














tM 




8» 


s» 


KOO 


HabPlI CrotoD. 


m 


• 


<H 


•0 


•0 


iiWiSg: 


ta 


S 
1 




9M 


» 


» 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















300 






F.E.aiDitii. 








No report to board. 

NSrepSttobSid.' 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























io" 

«■ 


1 

B 

" 1 


























« 


3M 


13 


is 


W.T.NMdbam. 














DO 




!S 


U 


4fi 


B.J. Lonscor. 
















2 




IB 


30 


Btbeiauile. 
























No report to board. 






11 
























No report to board. 
No report V board. 


















H 




IS 






7T 


M 


KSK"""- 






s 










So report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report (o board. 






































, 












16 


































SO 




Mn.F.McConiikik. 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















































No repon to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 




































2 






















$i,"iTir- 












M 


1«« 






* 






No report to board. 















LIBRABT OOMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Society lAbraiiea in Michigan. — Contindcd. 



Coonty. olty, dUtrict, 
lownihlp ot vill«ge. 


1* 


ClMI. 


"uaSi?" 


Own 


Support. 


i 


C*t»lacii«. 


BllUdAleCa^Con..- 


















IMM 


Sasi ::::;: 


glJSSSSf: 


§S:: 


























































IBSD 


School 

Sobool 




n B... 








•Ita.«ndane> 
































































































































































































RJSS-BU' 






























1«M 

18B8 


■Sa :::::; 




as- 








Farette.D.e 








cl^^ti^ 




















lass 


Sohool 

Scliool 


CIniu latins 






















SB... 




















I*<llo.'llb> 






Tu. A ODMt- 
Tuc. *nd Bnes 






Hlllld^e; mlblicKb^i 






SB.,. 






IBBS 


School 

school 


CUcuUHul 


tV:: 


Ki.""°" 








































1898 


School 


Clrcul&tlUK 


O^.. 


Silb.BDdaDea 
































lidiwiib'r 


CIrculatlDg 




FMiindflDei 


D 






IBTfl 


si::: 






















































































































U 


































two 


Sa :::;:• 


ffiSSS 












SB... 


un^aii^ 






























IMS 






SB... 


I^UtlOD 










:^:.-'.'r 






g(SS:D:S:v.:::::" 


1 






ttaford, D.8 












::::::::::::s|e 



















S B Sobool baUdlDg. 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPOBT. 59 

Public, Schml and Soeiely Libntriea in Michigan. — Contitiued. 



"s" 




sss 

dnr- 


1 




CUUClOD 

bo^m. 


Booka 
uiedfor 
retar- 

•Dce. 


Llbrarlao. 


Reuurka. 


















No report to board. 






.! 




».s 




10 


ssiiffiis-- 




7 








sSrepSntSboard; 

Mo report to board. 
No report to board/ 






















u 




























II 




IBM 


ISO 




Cbarlu A. Chandler. 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 


































■ 












No^^^bf;:^: 

report lo hoard. 

o report to board! 
o report to board. 
o report to board. 














M 


















1 
1 






















































3 
W 


























. 


SO 






HatUe Vanmrn. 








No report to board. 






7 




TOO 






Q. H. HiEbee. 










s 

n 










e 
















No report to board. 




ii 




T4T 


20 


01 


H.p.SSS?: 

Aneni Beeta. 


e 


ss 
so 




aw 


ii 


No report lo board. 












KateA. RiumU. 




10 


WW 














No report to board. 






17 00 






i'w.'sss;''- 


























No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















•g 


as 

in 




43 






Loral Donman. 


























i 


10 00 






William Wallace. 
Lewii A. Balney. 














1 










No report to board. 














j^ 


















30 





» 












No report to board. 

ii'SiS' 
















a 








































No report to board. 
No report to board. 




•■■•ii 


20 






















w.fss"- 








is 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















::' 


1 






30 


30 


Frank R.Brltto&. 
A. C. Haxw>n. 












* 


















No report to board. 











































LIBRARY COHMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Society Librariea in Michigan. — CowiimvED. 



CODDtji, altj.diBtrlct, 




cu„. 


or olrcu- 

btlDg. 


Own 

bund- 
ing. 


Bnpport. 


1 


Otalofiie. 


HlllKl&le CO.-00B.- 


































































1<M 


Bobool 




Own.. 








Rodin D 2 








B«»dlng,D.S... 


IBM 


Bobool 




Own.. 














g~dlDB.D.«.^ 


i««e 


Bohool 




Own.. 














RMdlD D 7 
















































































e*lpic.D.T 


im 


."T';::::: 


arcntetlug. 




Bob. and fines 




























1900 






Own.. 






















































ISTD 




ClKitiUtIng 




















































































§SS^::;::: 


SSISS 


SB... 
B B... 










IM> 


















































1900 






Own.. 


































































































































































































HooKhtonCo.: 


















IBM 


FrMpublio 


Botb 


Own., 




1). 










^:is.if'gi 


ira3 


Publlo 


CircutoU^' 


Rent.. 


7kX.UldflDN 




Written 




















1878 


School 


Bolb 


Own.. 


















































18?S 


Behool 

SfX.::; 


Bolh 


SB... 


TasaUanV.!!!. 


s- 










teso 


BotU 


SB... 












SBScboolbulldlDg. 


•B 


C. A H. MT 


gCo. D 


Dewey. 


U.3, ,. 







SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 61 

Public, SchtKil and Society lAbrariet in Michigan. — CONTINCtEo. 



ZL 
» 




S 

;i',. 


j 




Clr- 
cnlactoti 

bookg. 


enoe. 


.brar^b. 


Kemarke. 






w 

u 












"siSES; 

No report to board. 












































* 




KM 






R.L.Terp.bing. 


H 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 


« 




17 




«» 


W 


46 


HenrrSobobel. 












M 




A.B.Eejuoldi. 












No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report Co board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board- 
No report » board! 






<» 




























































30 












M 




10 SO 


00 


SO 


J. F. Frencb. 


















n 


B 


HI 


> 


gas 


20 


«0 


r. N. Elliott. 


































so 




; 




tTf 


U 


to 


OnCronk. 


























































1 

u 










M. T.Walworth. 






010 




2> 








i'SSa 
















^ 


3t 
















4SD 




81 


Henrr Kwlog. 






No report to board. 






































No I^«S board: 
















30 


X 










J. M. B^roei. 












No report to board. 


















U 

> 




















































HO 

30 














lis 




■3.U0 




Hn.B.8. QrierMD. 








No report to board- 






33W 




ITS 


Nellie Owen. 






No report to board. 


u 












w 




US 




80 00 


soo 


lOP 


Jerrr Bettens. 


V board 
















in 




















NO 

S,2» 


»0 


10 

no 


aeoo 
us 00 


2,m 

I.IW 




Fern Dotrawell. 
Alfred NlcbolU. 




'!;g 


200 





DSin, ~t.OOglC- 



LIBRARY COMMIfiSIONERS. 
Puhlie, School and Sooiely Libraries in Miohigan. — Coktinued. 



Countr. clly, dtalrict, 

lowD*hlp ai village. 


i 
i 


CIui. 


"iEF 


Own 

iBg. 


Support. 


— 


Ctnlogue. 


HoQEblna Co.— Con..' 

0«e<.l»,D.2 

PorUee, D.i 








3B.. 


se^rr- 




Bcboal 


B^ih 












IWfl 






Beat. 






















































im 


School 

Bobool 


Both 

ClronlfttlDK 


Own. 
Own. 










































1896 


8<:l">»' 


ClnmUtliig 


Own.. 


















1 






























































































me public 












































18M 


Free public. 


Ciredtatlnf 


Own.. 














































































































.I**'. 


laa:::::: 
i?.a :::::: 




|g::: 


































ISW 
















































































































































































ffl 


KKf*::: 


ClicuUtlng. 
























































































j 








































15::; 













































SB BohoDl building. 



L,,.L.,.., Liooqle 



SECOND ANNUAL REPOET. 63 

Public, School and Society Libntrics in Miekigan. — Coxtinded. 



Vol- 
on 


IT 




j 


tor 
books. 


boobi. 


5r 




Bemarki. 






■-™' 


, 








Sii"!"!^''-!. 








i.m 
















i,in 


:::: « 




100 




Dan Fliber. 




...J 




No rtport to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























2 




MO 


i» 


Robt. H. Klrwhman. 




» 


u 




























No report to boaril. 










2 




Manda Hagea. 






100 

20 
M 

1 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















































No report to board. 




■"1 










...., 600 






Mr*. F. H. Unton. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 






1 














^ 




B. R.Baur. 








1 




No report to board. 






> 


































No report to board. 
No teport to board. 




















^ 
























Wm.J. Crockard. 
Allen Kannedj. 

W.O. Mortimer. 


















ao" 


30 




tw 












No report to board. 


















No report to board. 






30 


' 




















No report to board. 
No report to board. 

NSKiSnSbSJd; 


















in 
ao 








































40 






















No report to board. 














inO.iviimbnU. 






' 






37 


37 










k;sssm: 

No teport to board. 







30 





























1 


























:;;v 


Zl 

" ii 

40 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















"i 


' "iTOO 






"iJE-'Toroeri 

A. Wride. 


















No report to board. 

.L.oo'][e 















LIBRARY OOUMISSIONBRS. 
Public, School and Somety Librariei in Michigan. — CONTINUED. 



Coantf. clt;, dlitrlct, 
towDihlp or Tiltogo. 


It 


Clui. 


IMcniKe 
or ctren- 
l-tUig. 


Own 

a. 


Sopport. 




CatalogoB. 


Horon Co.-Con..- 


















¥n» pabUc 


CtreoUttag. 


Beat. 




















im 




■ci^.iiii^. 


SB... 
































kS; §;!;:;:::: 


IBM 


■sijhiiv;.:::: 


BiihV.:::::: 


0.... 
































lUffi 

IMO 
1900 


Towniblp... 


Both 


Ront.. 
8 B... 


Tkx.tndfluM 






iilP-- 




Fne pabiJc 


ssrx 


KntarUlnoi-M 












Tu. uid ane* 














^^ 
















































































(lh»m>« n t 


im 


Bohool 


Clronhl«ng. 


8 B... 


Tu. and flne* 




































Owo.. 
Own.. 

Own.. 










18M 


































im 


Ssrjr"" 


ClrcDlMtDf. 


8B... 




























































19110 


Bcbool 


ClrcoluliiB. 


Own.. 


Sub.ftndtlBM 










i'E §■ ;■■■■■■■■■■ 


19011 


Kl::::: 


Circulating:' 


SS 


EnterMlDm'H 




Card 


'"f!K£b.. 












Scboot 


Both 


Own.. 




































Own.. 










1901 


























1»T 


School 


Citcoiiitliie 


SS:: 


T^. ud Hum 




















TZ2T. 




























tiSlis'--- 


1S93 


School 




Own.. 






























iSSSJgiliiBI" 






.,„,„.», 


Own.. 


..»™„.. 




Written 










BB... 












acbaol 












1900 




2T:: 


Sub. and tax. 



























































TtTtrogtc 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 65 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Slickigan. — Continued. 



Vol- nm- 


Books 
■•■(led 


i 


Ex- 
[wnilert 
ilnrlng 

for 


culBtlon 


uted tor 
refer- 


Librarian. 


„„.... 










Ko repnrt to board. 




now 














No report to board. 








J.8.Mor«D. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 

nSmp^mw board". 


s' , I 






: 






sis 


K 


so 


Kate h. C»Bipbell. 


















»0 


WT 


9. A. Puller. 

A.C. Voelker. 
JobD Hue. 

Joshu^Braan.'' 


i : 




ISM 




M 18 




SO 






















TOO 












No report to board. 


' 
















































No report to b<iard. 


»| 10 








Wm. Flper, 








No report to board. 
No report Co board. 


JS :::::::: H' 






Tncher. 


S9 ' 








3S 


35 










No report to board. 










Emma Halnie*. 
D»i»r cwh. 




3 


woo 














No report to bnard. 

No report to boarrt. 
No report to board. 


" i 

^^ :::::: w 



















Edman Duan. 










No report to board. 


S ■■"•??! % 






81 


ISO 

81 


E. J. DIebel. 

B. W. HcEmmTOy. 














No report to board. 








G 


Otto Andrews. 




















No report to board. 








* 


John Kceler. 
Arthur aeofleltl. 






2B0 












No report to board. 








IS 


t 


Ella Near. 
SMlla J. Decamp. 


























N (toi a 












No report to board. 




1 


. 13 00 






E.UaadOrT. 








No report Co board. 
No report Co board. 


















4SS 




100 


Raby Barber. 










Nn report to board. 












Elmer E. »hot«e11. 
Irene Corrj 

Frank BlUwortb 




IS 




BOO 












1^ 






1 


.... 


4 no 












^:SSSS;S: 




a 

































LIBRABY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Society Librariea in Miehigaa. — Continued. 



CountT. cK;, ilUtrtct, 
ViwMhip -r vlll.«B. 


1 

■s 

1* 


cu.. 


or circu- , ' rem Rupport. 
U«ng. boU.- 


_ 


C»tHogue. 


iDj^am ro.— can.; 
































































































achooi 


ClrouUttag. 


Own.. 




















me 


School 
























IwiilDg.D.T 


iwi" 


schooV.'.!!!! 
























■ 










leee 


School 


.-'—■:.«..-.:: 


















19W 


Bcbool 


Referonce .. ^ Own.. 










































































im 




































































1808 






Own.. 










School 




Feeeand Udm 
Ulat. fundi. . . 








E=i It: 




Written 














IBK 






SB... 
Own.. 
Own.. 


















8SS2S&KiSS 
































Btockbrtdge.D. »:„,... 


IBM 


|eb<|ol 


ClronUang. 


Own.. 

%i.:: 

SB... 


Tkutlan 


WiiVtiin 


Sloekbrldge, D. B 

V«i»y,».l 

v«i^:D.a 


1900 


IS::::: 


rircnlatlng. 
Both 


Tu.udane> 


.... Written 

D.' C»rd 




























School 




SB... 
Own.. 


Finee 


r 




IWO 
































■ \ 
















White Okk. D.I 


















School 














18W 


FrM public 


Keference.. 


Own.. 








































L 1- ■ 


r;soi;lc 



S B School balldiDg. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, Sohool and Society Libraries tn Michigan. — Contirited. 



Vol- 
UVl. 


1901. 


dnr- 
iDg 


£ 


boom. 


CDlatlon 


Books 

lis" 


Librarian. 


»...»., 






30 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 


































» 


























































:::::.: 


11 

5«S 




IB 10 






a. A. W«Tier. 










No report to board. 












Norman V. Gardner. 












No report to board. 


















I 
















2M 




a 


F. E. Parker. 


























No report to board. 






iu 


2 


14 «. 






Millie Parker. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 


79 




« 




















TeMher. 
















No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report lo board. 






" 






































































E.O.Wet»el. 
















nSkpSmw^^: 






« 




















M 






i 


1 








No report to board. 






2» 






A. L. Hoore. 
K. L. Bennett. 
Helen Copp. 
Samuel rf. Pen. 






31 


















::*:::* 


« 


































M.B.Ho[runi. 
Tcacber. 
Loaln Korbeck. 






1 


,s 








M 








IM 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















3 « 


2 


102 


U 




Wm. Kennedy. 

§:£SIKi„. 










MO 


4« 
10 


B 


30 00 
10 00 








1,IM 


i.«ej 


2,000 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















30 














H. C. Rowe. 












« 


« 
































No report to board. 














































NS™£SrtSbS^: 
No report to board. 


















■»' 


12 








T.J. Oillam. 











». 




















' 



























LIBRARY COMMISSIONERa. 
Public, Softool and Society Lihraries in Miohignn. — CoNnrJUED. 



'£»,^a■^fS°.^ 


S 
1 

1* 


Clui. 


•uss- 


Own 

rent 
build- 
ing. 


Snpport. 


f 

1 


Gat>1ogue. 


lont&Co.: 
















Km3?i^"::. ::::::: 




























































iSSSS'&Jri 




















S^booi 




SB.... 


Bub. kDd tax. 














' 


































































1SS9 

1893 






Own.. 
Owa.. 


Subscription. 
'Rut. ftod reea. 






Kulo 


School 


Reference. 












































1»T6 


School 

School 


aronUtinB. 


8S:: 

Rent. 


Sub.indauei 


















ksr'. 


gijsssasf: 
























1901 


School 


Both 


Own.. 


















1^ 






Own.. 


SobwirlpUon. 








School 


ClrcQlattDK. 


















School 

School 


Both 


Own.. 










isw 
















































i 



























































































sbiiooi 




ClrculaUng 


SB.... 


















North Flafni, Hubbard 


1S92 


School 

LidiM'lib'y 


CIrcaUtlDg. 
CIrouUting. 


Own.. 


Snbicrtptlon. 
FcMuid fines 




Printed 












School 

School 


Cirrulating 
Reference.. 


SB... 






























ias4 














Orum D 


School 


Clrcutattag. 


SB... 


Subsctiptlon. 


















Own.. 


TftK.tndiub. 














*"«••'• 


l«n 


School 


Referrace.. 


Own- 






























































M, 

















.LiOOglC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, Sohool and Soeietjf Librarieg (n Michigan. — CONTINUED. 



Vol- 

ebelvee 
Dec., 


Dec_ 


added 1 
dur. 1 

year, -c 


5SI 


■^r 


"Sr 


Librarian. 


aemarke. 






1 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
■Jo report to board. 

^o™KIrtwboart; 






















































1 








28 




1 

























Henry Colee, 
















Nnreport to board. 
No report to board. 
N D report to board. 


































Ge 
































AicbleLyle. 
BenleE.BCrong. 




■2S 




























M 


23 
3» 


























W 




»«, 


« 


*0 


Grace Kenedlct. 

Taacber."" 
Anna P. Webater. 
Wm. R. Renwlck. 










3» 








'••S 




15 


' 








67 


w 














> D report to board. 






3d 








ao 


H. D. OH^ood. 










Nd report to board. 




i' 


IB 

1 






IS 


IB 


Mn.'jf! K. smith. 












.... 


20 00 


































30 
SI 

aa 

ss 
w 












No report to board. 










Teacher. 


1 








No report to board. 
N report to board. 

S a report to board. 
Nb report to board. 






























1 " 






















IT 




eeis > 23S 




b. J. Crawford. 








No report to board. 










20 


33 


Maude Tbayer. 
Un. E.J. Gardner. 








AS 00 






13 


■! 








Noreport to board. 


3» 




2 7i ■ 20 


u 


Geo. W. Schneider. 










N a report to board. 














StHe"'' 




:::::::: 


IB 

1 




:::::::::t"7:::: 










SM 
































Calvin Unebaugh. 








, 




N ttoh d 






XI 










N D report lo board! 


































1 







LIBRABY COMmSSIONERS. 
Public, Softool and Soeietg Librariea m Miohigan. — Oo M T m n eD . 



County, Gitjr, district, 

towDiblp or vllli^a. 


i 
1 
■s 

1* 


cms. 


Reference 


Own 

bul°d- 

Ing. 


Support. 






lonik Co^Con.: 


















































































U61 


School 

School 


SSSSI 


a B. .'! 


























18B9 






































































law 


gSSSS!::::;: 


&:;::■ 


gg::: 


»ab.aDd Bpe> 
Tu. *nd foM 




















im 






Own.. 


Bygr«Dee... 


































































































































I 




































































































































































































Iron Co.: 




i 




















































"SriS^ii D , 




' 











































































































































































S B Scbool building. 



>L.OOglC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 71 

Public, Bohool attd Society Libraries in Miohigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 


■€'r 
■"■• 




1 


peudad 

booka. 


booka. 


Books 




„^. 




1 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


■i 

» 
w 

100 

NO 

IM 

SH 
































































as 


3S 


g-rHr."""- 
























No report to bond. 


io 








ie 


28 


Peter KobD. 








No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















aas 






















x 


s 


T 


"S 






Jobn W. Portaoe. 
Pearl 1. Helm. 


» 


M 


No report to board. 










3M 




C. B. HartBr. 












No report to board. 




1 






40 


40 


James Nott. 
Teacber. 




3 














No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

Nof^rttoboard'. 

No report to board. 

NorepSrttoboard: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


« 






























X 
























3M 

«» 

M 

W 

12 

n 
no 

in 












































IB 




























































































No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board'. 


















» 
































































No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to ho»rd. 
No reiHirt to board. 


















400 
100 

M 




































u 
















K 








































































No re^rt to board. 




10 
















n 












No report to board. 

NoEepSrttoboard; 
No report to board. 






























MR 
IM 




M 







































LiOOgIC 



LIBEABT COMMlSSIONERa. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — ConriNUED. 



'==,«'s?e!' 


i 
It 


Cl«f». 


ViT 


Own 

balld- 
tag. 


Support. 




C»t»lopn. 


i«b.ii.co^<;o».. 




































































































































CoU«ge.... 






































































































































































































































JackK>n Co. : 


I»B3 


Scbool 


Referenca. 






















ISW 


School 


RrferencB.. 


Own., 


Fl"" 












IS 


School 

School 

Bch™i :::::: 


CircoltUng. 
ClrcalfttiDg. 


SB... 


















TW-i-nUflne. 
FeMBndfinci 








































Scbool 




SB... 


























































Ron... 






































Itwe 


School 

School 


OirculaUog, 


SB... 
SB... 


























im 

1900 


School 


E.f,™».. 


Own.. 












































1900 
















School 


Beforonce .. 


SB... 


















































1897 


School 


Clrcul«tlDg. 


Own.. 


















M1T3 


School 


Both 


Own.. 


































1)M 





























SB School building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 73 

Public, School and Society Librariet in Uichigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 

■€;." 


Pam. 
pbleu 

■b^lrei 


added 
dnr- 


1 


Ei- 

books. 


w°r 


Books 
UMd for 


Librarian. 


Remarka. 


















No report to board. 


































N^^JltobMrt: 
No report to board. 




















































"i'.m 


£1 
1,224 


























No report to boardi 
















«t 




24,300 


128.000 


MaiyJ-JordnD. 






No ?lpS"w board; 

No report to boM^. 
No report lo board. 
No report to board. 


















































28 






















' 






a 


























No report to b«ird. 






























No reimrt to board. 
No report to board. 










































No report to bow^. 






















5 




f4N 






MlltoDj.Prencb. 












3 








1» 


30 


JuliMChmeb. 












No report to board. 




..■-" 


IB 




10 47 




30 


F. W. Phillips. 
PnjnkH, Brown. 




U4 












;::::;.: 


M 

1 
30 




4110 














Norep^fltSbES^: 


















40(10 






F. H. Brown. 








NorepSSwb^: 

No report to board. 




























IS 


•^ 


'^ 


9M 






Frank Ford. 








No report to board. 




::::::;: 


^ 
















7B0 






Norma Preston. 






01 








No report to board. 




::;;^ 


3 
B 




006 






N. U. Da via. 
Mrs. Eva M. Davis. 
Teacher. 






20 








3 16 












> 




IW 


* 


s 


Ella Preston. 








a 

26 








N^repo'tW board. 




























ID 




3M 


= 


* 


Wells Sn;der. 






I 


13 83 






V.H.iii^. 


























No report to board. 






24 




BOO 




20 


BUnche Dean. 






^llc 



74 LIBRARY COUMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Sooietj/ Libraries m Uichigan. — CoimNUZD. 



County, city, dUtrtct, 
lowniblp or village. 


i 
1 




Juikaon Co.— Con..- 


I8M 


School 


Refereuiw.. Own.. 














































1880 


Fret public 




Duutlon 

aub.andliDei 


D. 




I 




Own.. 
























Ltb'T reenter.. 














lew 


School 

School 












CIrculitliig 


Own 












































IBM 






































IK» 






Own.. 










































































IMA 






























Sch 




" 










9=l™" 


Refsnnca. 














































"" 


School 


; 








School ciiruUtinl.- S B... 
































w» 


School 


ClroulMlnB-l SB... 






Writt 












School 


BefereDCB..' SB.,. 


Ite. kDd fees. 














School 


inference ..| 6<^.. 


Tu.uidflnw 














































































SB... 
































i^s^! igr"""' 


Own.. 


















-nu.sndanM 

























































So"™" 


Clrculntliig 


Own.. 





























































II School building. 



..:>L.OOg[C 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 75 

Pitbtie, School and Society Librariei in Michigan. — Conii.sued. 



.Vol- 


Fkin- 
pbleM 


Books 
added 
dot- 

year. 


1 

1 

£ 


Ex- 
pended 

ror 


Cfr. 
books. 


Booke 
refer- 


Librarian. 


«.„«.. 




4 


10 




MBS 






Wm. Cobo. 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























M.3K 


=-|l 


T6 


2,0(MeO 


W.l)00 


1S.D00 


C. V. Waldo. 
Attce Bam». 






No report to board. 






iiso 






Teacher. 








[fo report lo board. 










30 


tt 


Lewi* E. St. John. 
EdnaUorr. 




«, 


































No report to board. 


















2M 






Frances Miller. 




, 








f t> rd 














No report to board. 












R.b.M.Edward». 
















" 












No report to hoard. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 












































U 1 


low 






TeechM. 










No report to board. 
















Wm. Koez. 
Beaile Fay. 










euo 














No rei"irt to board. 
nS report iSboarf.' 






















•! 
















13 H 






Wm. Pechham. 


n 


















1 


























,, 










IS 


,» 


W. C. Bocnoe. 






, 1 
















" 


A.J.Bmlth. 
















No report to board. 






a 




3DD 




^ 


Uell E. Turner. 
























































No report to board. 












































W 




Teacher. 






























Ko report to board. 






" 




BW 






Emma Haiellon. 
W.H.^vl.. 
















42 


B 


4EW 














So report to board. 
















r 


2a 












No report to board. 


1! 














iiw 




Dennis Donn. 








113 




















( (-ix-iqL-- 



LIBRARY COMUISSIONERS. 
Public, Schoal and Soctefy lAbrariea in Michigan. — Contikded. 



Countj, city, dlKrlct, 
to»-n&lporvllta«e. 


1 

1* 


latiQg. 


OWD 

rent 
build- 
ing. 


— 




Catalogue. 


Jackson Co.— Con ■ 










' 


Bprlng Arbor. D. « 

Hprlns Arbor, D. T 

|prjii|port.D.lfl 

Sprlngport, U. I B 


IKTl 


'sijbMiV.;;;: 'cirenlatlnB 


Own. 

is- 
























s!;rIn|ESrt>:3 






Own. 












































1 






1 




ItWT 


Sbhooi KBfer«nce.,:dWn. 












1«H 


School , Circulating.! Own. 














18K 


School ClnmUUng 




nn., 1 


















































?Z!:l:S::fi:r"::;::;: 


1«»6 


School ' arculatlne 

School ^Clroulallng 


F,n„ 






























190U 


























































1 




















IB9I 


















1 








ini 




Own . . 1 .i^iaUon 
















































'iibo' 


gaS::::;: gSffiS:!:'.'.":; 








Hrail;.U.2 


























Brad?, D. a 


1901 


fliWiV.:::: 








- ■■.■^. 






Rent.. 








rharleitcn I) i 


1 






















19(W 
IBBS 
























School 


arcniatlng. 


SB... 


















School 



























































































SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Society lAbraries t» Michigan.— CosTmxjED. 



Vol. 

■belvei 
Dm., 


Pam- 
1901. 


added 

year. 


9 

1 




"IZ' 


S' 


Librarian. 


KemarkB. 




io 


IS 
BO 












No report to board. 


« 




13 M> 


TO 


TO 


CO. Wortb. 










n 


Kat^ Ludlow. 








soo. 










V b rd 


« 




09! 


40 


w 


MalMl WUbnr. 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 


























U 




I 




















aoo 






W. B. Wblte. 














No report to board. 






S 








30 


carouse L^rd. 










No report to board. 


















> 






































W.H.HaTen. 








3 




soo 


U 












No report to board. 






















' 




10 » 






SUMD A. Fo>l«r. 


ai 














































' 












No report to board. 
No report to b.^rd! 


































is 




10 00 






J. T. Baldwin. 






































100 


Ur>.CaiTleJan>ea. 






















6 










E. P. Haoklej. 














No report to board. 






























i: 














700 
























No report to board. 
No report to board. 


.¥ 


















> 




100 




30 


R. Westbrook. 
F. G. Bennett. 




2S 


























No report to board. 
















Joseph Harrison . 
A. ForbUBh. 






1 




2W 




















lao 




































No report to board. 






































































No report to board. 









* Alw eqwDdsd U2 for maps. 



LIBKAKY COMMISSIONERS. 
I'ublie, School and Soeiely Librariea in Michigan. — ConTiNUED. 













T*"*""" 










■School 












































































IH» 


TOWMblp... 


aK\iii.aif 


Rent.. 


TULaOdflDM 












































iS 






Own.. 










?SSi™;: 


^?.V.«„r 




D. 






riinl«d 
















































M61 


ikAool 


CIrculatiDg 


SB... 






















1 






























































,m 


School 




Own.. 


TimHo 














































1B»6 


'^^~" 


drcuuims 


S^. 
















ISh»! :::::: 


CircaUting 










































I-onua, D 




















































sc"Soi''....r.' 
























' 






































.:::::i's^'bii.v.".;;:! 


aiiutating 




■ ■^-j. 






























































^*™" 


CiTClLUltlDg. 






































I*die»M1b-y 




ss::: 










IBU 








8cli<K.icr«(t;u.ion.... 










Rent.. 


Ikx-uidflnn 


















































IHO 


Free public. 


drculatliiB 










' 








"olr 



SECOND ANNUAL BEPOBT. 79 

Public, Schoot and Society Librarks in Micftiyan.-— Continued. 



™-|»-'boo.. 

™« Phiei.,^^' 

Dee^ I>ec., 1 J;?B 

i»i. mi. 1 J**'- 




pended 
bo^ki. 


Clr- 
cDlatton 

books. 


enee. 


Librarian. 


Remark*. 


i 








»l 




Clarence Karl. 




m 












No report to board. 






isitT 
















No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board? 

NofepSJlMboardl 
No report lo board. 


^ " 
















1 












449 


1 ", 




. 1600 


TX 


Hal Ata^Rl Brown. 































.:::;::; 


B 

1« 




440 






btepban Macbtn. 
Ktia Parker. 




«2,vn 


31 




a, 671 


i» 


l.wooo 




























No report lo board. 
























M 


lHomaa Van Uall. 
















No report lo board. 


































No report to board. 
Nortporctoboard. 




















*. 


3 












** 










J.H.KUInK«r. 


No report loboanl. 




14 










No report to board. 
No report loboanl. 


















6 

1 


















20 


9fi 


Wm. H. OIlTer. 














0»T 








as 












tfinnleNevel. 




ffi 

33 

■i 

IB 

K 

1M 
l.»2 
M 














NoMpSrtSbSS". 
No report to board. 


















1 


















» 




Mr». B. H. Croll. 
A. a. rallowa. 


























No report to board. 




tt 






















NSrepSrtWboard: 




M 
















* 


•* 


H.Jickltog. 










SSSKSKS: 






























S,".KKSM; 




























C. E. Cliik. 
















No report to board. 


















7S 

40 


1 




4H 




Levt Bmltb. 
OraTfavU. 

Carrie L. Van Antmrp. 












uoo 

MM 








' 
















No report to boart. 


;{ 










































A. r. DoDglaa. 


L,OOQlC 








' ' 



LIBRARY C0MMISSI0HER9. 
Public, Sohool and Society Libraries in Michigan. — CoirriirUED. 



"sjiiS'saBS? 


1 

If 


ClHa. 


"^EF 


Own 
bulM. 

iDg. 


Support. 




— 


Kilunaioo Co.— Con.; 






























Scbool 




SB... 




































' 














































wre 




























































































































































































































































































































































School 

■jtehwi'.::::: 


Circulating 
Raterence.i 


'sb'.'.: 


FinM 






^l&EE 


iwe 






























JSSS-g-in 


1899 




























IBM 




























































iSl'I'Sii---"-" 


































1899 


Bcbool 




Own.. 


















1899 














































































































1876 


S^f"-- 


CiTOotaUng. 


6m'.'. 
















































, 



S R School build lug. 



D.3nz.,I.X'OOglL 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 81 

Public, Sckool and Society Librariet in Uiohigan. — Continued. 



1 

smei 1 phlet^ 


dur- 


J 


Ei- 
HDded 
dDrlUK 


booke. 


refer- 


Librarian. 


Renuuki. 


48 

75 
» 

St 
« 

at 

w 
isa 

H 
40 
1«0 

» 

IK 
•JX 

20 

■„ 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























Eltaamnt. 




2 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 











































a 


































































No report to board. 






























No report to board. 

No report 10 board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 














































43 














































































No report to board. 


















M 










































No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

Sorep-irttoboarU. 






















40 
91 






































114 00 




FraulE Petenon. 




42 




No report lo board. 

No report to board. 












U 


i 








Teacher. 














^, 


20 


'^ 






* 


Teacher. 










No report to board. 

No report to board. 


















1 






















m 


^ 




























3*0 




S3 


L. D. iiibor. 




^ 




No report to board. 










21 


OllvoE. Narti. 






20 








No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

NoSpSrtwboard'. 
No report to boanl. 

No report to board. 






























111 








































20 












. 




18 00 






M J O'M ra 








Joeepb Poet. 










No report lo board. 


















' ' r 


LiOOQlc — 



82 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Jfichtjun'.— ConriNua). 



<2»,?S ?!!«■• 


1 
1* 


CUM. 


IMlng. 


Own 
or 

b"ud- 
Ing. 


Bnpport. 




Catalofue. 


Kent Co.- 
Ck)«iloii 


a>n.: 
















































IBM 












































frr; 




lt«3 






Own.. 




















Cbddod 




urn 




Own.. 
















^^' 




ISM 








































i8Ba 




















ConrtUi 
Coortl* 
GBlnei, 
nalncs, 
G«lnM, 

OBlDea, 














































18OT 
IBM 

law 

IBSB 
















SB... 
















ftcbool ' CIrcuUclUK 














GraDdB 

Grand ] 
Oreod] 
Grand 1 










^piViii^:::;- 




D 


rt'dandnrd.. 


SlStS::,"::: 


1UB9 




Own., 


































KB-.l"::: 


im 


^'""' 


ciro--ta«.ie: 


















im 


B«g^} 


Rtlanaet.. 


SB... 


Tu. kud flnea 






gSSSSlStSfi- ■ 






School 

School 

SSS :::;:: 

TawDshlp... 


ClrcaUtms! 




Tax.uidBnBa 






Grand B 
Grand 1 

i§ 

Kelaon, 

oueei^ 

MS 

FM1», D 








'E'V"" 


ii 
















Tu. and rest. 
T»i.»ndflneB 








O. 
























T 


I87r. 




CIrcutoUng. 




Tta. *nd anoB 




Prlntod 




















































































































1 


1898 


^!;::;:: 


gSffiffif: 


27.:: 








IkxBtlon 




Written 






arcotetlng. 


B«nl.. IMftUon 
















IMS 


Bchool 

























































BB Sobool building. • Township cleik'a otDce. D Dewey. 



Li O Ogle 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPORT. 83 

Public, Bdiool and Societj/ Librariea in Miohigan.^^iiointsvED. 



Vol- 


1901. 


B. 


, 


'to? 

bo^. 


4r 

bDolU. 


BooVa 


Llbrmrian. 


Remarlu. 


xt 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 




*» 
















SElssr- 






M 










<9 










' 








No report to board. 










f. 


DeDDlB Bellow*. 










No report to board. 












Jouatlian Sowerby. 


43 




7 








No report to board. 






»> 


Mn.J.VanAiDburg. 






No report to board. 






g 










7<« 


BTW 


300 


•» 


Geo.W.Gort»ui. 


No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




1 












» 










20 










ii' 

4,20« 


io 


BM 






HiDDle Renjron. 
R. E. Kelley. 

E. H. Brewer. 
C. A. Cramback. 
JobD J. Luneke. 


»a 


30 






* 


-■1 SS 


40 








360 
300 

2,123 97 










3.MD 

n 


" 


1»T,9T1 


2B 
G,4S0 


No report to board. 






1 00 






Wm. E. Webb. 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 






31 
















BU 
















No report to board. 




60 


u '.... 


400 






Ella BraDian. 




40 
400 






1^ 


100 






ROD 

ii 




3, TO* 


38 
ISO 


'ia' 


IB 

410 

16,S0T 


300 


No report to board. 
Ko report to board. 














LOW 




Tsre 


s,nM 




Chester Q. Stone. 




No report to board. 

SoJS?SS£bSSd; 


















' 


























;■;;:;:: 


2S 
























Nore[!Srttoboard. 


























NorepSrttoboard. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 














^ 


. "1 " 

'1 " 


» 


BOD 


ISO 
110 


i^ 


Teaeher. 


lU 


' 


400 


20 


M 


Har? B. Crahes. 












Teacber. 




■■•■■■■■1 • 










nSf^rtW board! 







































84 LIBRARY COMmSSIONERS. 

Fablic, School and Socict]/ Libraries in Michigan. — CONTIKUIfO. 



CooDty, clty.dlitrlct, 
towiumporvill»ge. 


i 

£ 

1- 


c„^ 


or olrcn- 
latlDg. 


Own 
Ing- 


i 


CM«logne. 


K^t Co-con. 
















































































































use 


fkhool 


























IMS 

1W6 


ai:::::: 


ci"SiJmS|: 
































































'*" 






Omi.. 


Sool&Ii,taz... 
































































































































\fm 


School 


Both 


Own.. 


Ttti. »nd lines 




Printed 


































piiii:!;:::;;;::::: 


18M 


School 

School 


Circulating. 

ClrculktlnK. 


Own" 




































^S-«:e:: 


lees 


School 




8 B... 








School 


Reference.. 


















MM 


Stboot 


arcolfttlng. 










Walker.D.S 














































im 


Sch 






Tuc. and flues 


















im 


sialooi 


CircuUtiDg 


SB... 


















Stei:::;; 


both 


sb!:: 
















S^saS.ii:::::: 






















IB^S^'F-: 


less 


School 


ClrcnUtlng 


Own. 






























KcwranwCo.i 


































itwu 


Free public 


CliiulatiBf 


8B.. 







































S B School building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 85 

Public, Behoot and Society Libraries in J/ic&t<7<A. — Costinueb. 



Vol- ' Pam- 
tbelTM'ibelvca 


added | | 

;£ii 


Ex. 


l)ooki. 1 EDce. 

1 


„,».„. 


Remarki. 


", 










1 




V3 report to board. 

N ) report to board! 

No report to board. 
N 3 report to board. 
No report to board. 
N } report to board. 
















le 












1 












N 












































33 




W03 


es 




W.-W.PhllHpe. 




V J report to board. 




3S 




aoo 


so 




sr.'a5ii.i»"- 














Vi report to board. 
Noi^Jltoboart'. 






















IS 
U 














.... 


3TO 


m 




Jamei £. Hanna. 






N a report to board. 
S) report to hoard. 
N report to board. 
































i* 
















1 




N report to board. 
N a report to board. 
>[> report to board. 
N report to board. 












































I 








J. C. JoTtenwr. 












Njreport to board. 
N 1 report to board. 
N report to board. 






3 




























3 




400 






T. S. Putnam. 














6 












Nil report to board. 
N 3 report to board. 
















1?. 








!B 


1 


Hable BoirhaU. 






















\ > report to board. 







3 




m 


20 


Flora Ball HopUni. 


j^ 




No report to board. 
N 3 report to board. 
^ a report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to boar.1. 






















" 






















m 


12 


* 




SM 




,. 






i 


12 




HOD 


10 




B^e O'BrteD. 










a 


1 




IM 






Teache™""' 




































. 


N> report to board. 

N J report to board. 

No report to board. 

Xo report to board. 

No report to board! 




1 










I'M 


M 


81 1^ Martin Whalen. 












1 1 

L...I 














2B 


20 ....1 2S00| iw 1 15 ; j. A. lU^iiton. 


IM 





















LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Sooielg Libraries in Michigan. — Cokthojed. 



"»a,5'S',1S55.'' 


i 
1 


Clui. 


Reference 
or olf ou- 
LUng. 


Own 
lug. 


Snpport. 


1 
1 

1 


Cittlogue. 


lAkeCo.: 






1 






















































































































































- 


































































































































"^ItZ^th , 





















































































Ladles' ltb> 




ReDt.. 
















































































































































AW D 8 
































































































































BarnBlde.D.T 


















































lew 


Townrt.*... 




aiai. 
































Dr^,D.^ 



















.!f . 


L»dl«B'ltbT 




Own.. 


Feraandanm 










































































































rvoviv^'ic" 



SECOND ANNUAL BEPOET. 87 

Pubtio, S<Aool and Society lAbrariea t» Michigan. — Contimted. 



Vol- Fun- 

ihalvexhelTel 
Dee^ Dec., 
U91. 1801. 




£ 


Ex- 
booki. 


cnlaUon 
boolo. 


refer- 


Llbtariao. 


He.ar.. 


N 
















nSJ^S to board: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















G3 

w 

IS 
















































7S 










































No report to board. 






ISO 
IW 




































No report to board. 
No report to board. 






76 












































IS 






























































tiw 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report Co board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















1 ^ 










































uo 


ID 




MOO 














No report to board. 
































No report to board. 
No report to board. 

o report to board. 
o report to board, 
o report to board. 






















































I 






























































S 












No report to board. 

No repSrttS board! 

report to board, 
o report to board. 
orepSrt to board, 
o report to board, 
o report to board. 

NoieportEoboard. 
No report to board. 














































« 












































30 






































. .. 






» 






4m 


400 


HarylLFnllMD. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

NSrepSrtWboanll 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















.. 
























■••: 




s 


* 


»<» 


2000 


no 


AnnJeJ.LaDgblln. 


















41 






















































































UBRABT COMM1SSIONEE8. 
Public, School and Societj/ Libniriet in Mickigan. — COTirmxjai. 



CoaDtjr. city, dlitrlct, 
MWDiblporvllkge. 


i 

1 


CIM*. 


Betarenco 


Own 
log. 


Support. 


: 


CatKJopie. 


^^S^rTi' 


























































































• 1 




































































{gdj*'r.D|- iwo 






Own.. 


Bub.«idTii 


































































Sg: K:S:.:::.:;;:::; :::::: 




8 B... 


































Sobool 


Retereaee. 


Own.. 






































































mS"S™'d I'li 










































SSS:KJ:::;:::::!i.. 


iowaihip.'.'. 


Cliiiiutiiiil 






















































i 


























































NorthBr.Doh.D.1 i 




















































































































































j 
































































1 



























































SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. ' 89 

Public, School and Sodely Libniriea in Mi^igan. — Contixded. 



Vol- 

■bXea 
Dec., 
1901. 


run- 

Dec., 


Booki 


1 


85rtDg 
books. 


"dlr 


"S" 


Librarian. 


Bemarka. 


















No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















































No report lo board. 
No report to board. 

report to board. 

report to board* 
o report to board, 
orep^t to board. 

No report to board. 






2G 




































































2 




























HOO 




2» 


DelU Bollock. 


































No report to board. 
No report to board. 






































43 


» 


MOO 






C. H. N^'lor. 








No report lo board. 
No report to board. 






40 














E 








EllaFhelpe. 










No report to board. 
No report lo board. 
No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 

No report to board. 
No report lo board. 


















g 


















M 












138 





























20 






















NoIlpS?lWbo!Sd: 

No report to boanl. 


















W 














.... 


»oa 






D. H. Butier. 


» 








No report to board. 

No report to board! 

No report lo board. 

No report lo board! 
No report to board. 

No report Ml board. 
No report lo board. 








































































!0 




















; 




































1 

la 














No report to board. 
No report lo board. 











































No report to board. 
No report to board. 










































No report lo board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 




2 




1 
















1 
































2» 
































' 








LiOOQlC 



LIBBABT GOHMISSIONEBS. 
Public, School and SooUty Liirariet in Miohigan. — CoitTinum. 



■SrsSSSIfK'' 






































IBS8 


TowMhIp... 


Cireal&tlDg 


Rent.. 


















.873 






1 ,-^^y^ 


































IBCT 


Free public 


















































SJISlSiv 


OrculMiDK 


Eenl.. 










ISW 
























1 




































IWl 


Towmmp... 


Clnui»aae 










































































i>i§6 

I8W 


Townihlp... 


Both- 




Iki. aait flnei 




































18W 


ScbODl 

TOWDBhlp.,. 

scho^.'.!!!! 


cicnittil'iig. 

SSf'"'"';: 


Own., SnbMriptlon . 












Adrlu CDllen 


IMS 


. ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 






Own.. 








i^ 










an... 






















































1W« 


Sohool 


ClrcntaUDc. 


SB- 
















W70 




ciii^tbiB. 
























































isssl 


lUfcnuee.. 


SB... 






































































School;::::: 




U::: 










less 


TU-ud'ann 




'™-' 




1880 






oiD.. 




















































1 












18» 




Rent.. 


i^-andrMi 






































nir 



9 B School building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 91 

Pvblio, School aitd Sooiety Ltbivries in iliohigan. — Oontinued. 



IBM. 


puen 

■belvee 
Oct., 
IMl. 


Book* 

,S5. 




™r 
books. 


Clr- 

"2° 


Book* 


Librarian. 


Remarka. 






3a 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 








































£S 


Z8T 


JohnFleei.Jr. 






' 






No report lo boanl. 








TO 


76 


Fred Alklnion. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























100 


100 


Marvin La Core. 












No report to board. 
NofepSrttoboard; 
















































Geo. Fnllck. 
RoxK.Tboma.. 






" 


* 


(13 7S 


180 


» 


No report to board. 

No report to board. 






















2 
























No report to board. 




12 








16 




Wm.Dallon. 












No report to board. 

No report lo board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















I* 




























B 


















M,905 


10 


Alfred A. SoMloDi. 
Margaret F.Jewell. 










u 


1.000 OD 










No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















io 








10 
£00 


TO 


Carrie E. Oreitory. 
Earl R. Rloe." 
L. H. RIobarde. 
F.Knoph,Jr. 






23 


MOO 
WOO 






■,:».i « 










90 
2 






ns 


2,200 


3.000 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 


































2B 




14 00 






Teaober. 








No report to board. 







2 

32 




000 


140 




FeterH.Bonton. 






IrSSS 































K 


I 


200 






W. W. AnnUrong. 




















nS report to board: 




:::::::: '» 




























s 




400 






atEu'S: 
























No report to board. 














14 
















Mo report to boardl 
No report to board. 






















« 


































300 




H.C. RVlan. 














No report to board- 
No report to board. 































92 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Piiblie, School and Society Librartea in Michigan. — Costuided. 



County, city, district, 
townlhip or vlll>«e. 


i 


CUu. 


Rererenca 
or clrcu- 
Utlng. 


Own 
rent 

'is;;*'' 


Support. 


g 


Ottlogue. 


Lenawee Co.— Con.; 




















School 

School 














IMO 




























































































































































Own.. 


































































































































1887 


School 


Circnhitlng. 


















































iim 


School 






TMStlon 










SB... 
















1890 , School 


Cltc'iiinUDtE^ 


... 




















































18»«|Soliool 






Don.ud BQb. 




















1 
















































1861 






Ita. &D<1 flne« 










































































1 














































SB.. 


TBx.imianes 
































































































im 


Free public 




Own. 


Feet and Hnea 














































im 






















::i'";i,i,vi; 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 93 

Publio, School and Society Libraries in Uichigint. — Costihced, 



Vol- 




Book! 
added 


, 


pefd-ed 
'daring 

booka. 


bc^b. 


"S' 


Llbr«rU.n. 


K...rk., 


















No report to board. 






1 




low 






SiSiA'S^.. 














" 










No report to board. 














































No report to boarii. 
No report to board. 


































us 

30 




W 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 




























1 






J 


7 


Frank J. Button. 






No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
Ko report to board. 


























































































» 












No report to board. 












Jennie Potta. 
WlnnUredBradleb. 












M 


















No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















2 






sua 


■!S 




Mn.J. M. We«t. 
atanlera. Brulbb. 




3 




IZD 










No report to board. 




" 


1. 










O.JajrMcCrillea. 


W 


^ 


10 00 


87 


« 


No report to board. 




































Allen Pack. 














No report to b6ard. 
No report to board. 






M 








1 








WJ 




Margaret A. PUer. 


























No report to board. 












431 Mrs. Marj HBrUn. 


u, 




1 




















No report to board. 


























No report to board. 














i i 




























No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 










TresaleJ.Roeen. 


































1 : 




xS"pS"wbo»Id: 












i .. B 


»00| 980 




Mrs. W. H. Arner. 






No report to board. 
No reiiort to board. 
Nore|«.rttoboard. 


























Adarulckler. 
















, ,00<-7W 



UBRART COIDOSSIONEES. 
Public, School attd Society Libraries in Miohtgan. — Continued. 



"£»„•',"!■«.•■ 


i 
i 

•5 


CUu. 


%sst 


Own 
Ing. 


Bnpport. 


1 


Catalogue. 


Lenawee Co.— Con..- 




































School 








































gifTr^K:::;::::;::. 


l«w 


School 


arcDUHng. 


Own.. 


TU.MldtlDM 










gSlilS'gi ;■•::■ 




■^h^iiv.:::: 


■^"- 




■i^«:::::::; 




■iiV-" 








































SKi!;;:;;;:::- 










































































IBM 


School 




H:: 












































































SSi:;;;::;;: 


































































































.!*^. 


FreepnbUc. 


Sotb 


Own.: 


Ita.Mdilnei 


D. 




















ie«6 




















Own.. 




































Llvljx^^n CO, ^ 














Bri|hton,D. 


















































































































































































































































S'S!!.'::--:. 


:::::::::::::::::::■ 















































LiOOglC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 95 

Puilio, School and Sooiet]/ Libraries in Uichigan. — Continited. 



Vol- 

■€•- 

mi.' 


nun- 

f 


Booki 
added 
dar- 


i 
1 

£ 


Ex- 

book*. 


bo^ki. 


nwdfor 
refer- 


Librarian. 


...... 






30 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















20 










HonrjJ. MUler. 












No report lo board. 






















12 










Chwle* B. Ford. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 






* 
















■ISO 


to 




B. r. BOA. 






No report to board. 

NSrepSrtw board; 

No report lo board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
Mo report to board. 


























1 








































IT 




1 














flO 






Leroj Billings. 


111 


1 








No npoit to board. 
No report lo board. 






















3 
























No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 


















* 




































































^ 












1 


3,SjJ 




2 


21 


340 00 
104 


35,000 




Mr*. 6. J. Hoe;. 
Cbarle* W. Allen. 


30 


No report to board. 


» 




]» 


20 


60 


L. n. Pearwn. 
K. W. Rudeilll. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 




























1 






It 












































1 








r; 
















NS«pS"SbS;^: 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report lo board. 
































































12 










No repSftM board! 
No report to board. 




































IB 


j 








1 














No report to board. 




























a 







































UBBART COUmSSIONEBS. 



Public, School and Society Librartea in JSohigan. — Continued. 



iJJX'Sv'iSK'- 


1-^ 


otdreu- 
iRting. 


Own 
baUd- 

iDf. 


Snpport. 


: 


Otalogoa. 


LivlnntoD Cn.— Con..' 


1 








































































































































































































































































SS;:!l'gi:-:":"i:::::: 



















Udie.'Ub'j 


























































































Luce Co.: 




























KacklnacCo.: 






























Own.. 


























!«.. 


Free public. 
Kree public. 




Own.. 
Rent.. 






Printed 








































Rent.. 








M«oorob Co ; i 
































































_ 


1 






















































































































1 























































.L'OOQiC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, Sohool and Society Librariea in Uiehigan. — Coktihued. 





pbleU 

abelTca 
Dec., 
IMl. 


Book! 
,'Sfr. 


I 


Ex- 
pended 
daring 

rear 

boSki. 


Cir- 
caUUon 

of 
booha. 


"S' 


Librarian. 




















No report to board. 






















































































No report to board. 






11 
























No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No JSpSrt ttl board! 

No report to board. 






































































11 
























































i.too 




10 


















































No report to board. 




















16 










No report lo board. 
No report to boMd. 

No report lo board. 










































2S 

SO 












1.MS 




















Hn. Wm. McRm. 










No report to board. 












12 




Wallace Ruaael. 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















■ 




'S 


'S 


c'B.mmMton. 
























No report to board. 
No report t.. board. 


























9 


9 


Joieph L, BeloDsa. 












No report W board: 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 




















300 
2> 




















1,S» 












1 


























































No report to board. 

No ESpJw board! 
No report lo board. 






I 




















M 
































B 




[ ' 




So report to board. 








































a 

























LIBBABT COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — ConnnaEO. 



S!S::S:r;::;;:::::: 








::;::::; 








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































M»l.t.eCo.: 

































































































































































































gl™-'?' 










































































































r ,- 




t .niHyir 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 99 

Public, School and Society lAbrariea in Michigan. — Continued. 



Dec., 

1«01. 


Fun- 

ibe^e* 
Dec., 


added 
year. 


1 

1 


Ex- 
pended 


culatlon 


"refer-' 


Ltbrartao. 


Remama. 







7 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board i 

N^repSSw board! 
No report to board, 

No report to board'. 

No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 


















































1 








































































a 

























































10 








































































No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 






















4 












100 
























































' 












No report to board. 

nS report "board; 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

Mo report to board! 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 


















S 




























T7 








































27 








































e 

A) 

32 

W 




















































































































siSiS 






















2 
























No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















































M 
























































32 




























































S3 

Ma 





































UBBABY GOMSaSSIONEBS. 
Public, Bohool and Society Libraries in Uiokiga». — CONTIKUED. 



"£»$?; SK' 


1 

1= 


CUu. 


lattng. 


Own 

rent 
build- 
ing. 


support. 




Cattlogue. 














































































































































































































































































































































































JS^SISIit""!^:::::::: 


1BT2 




Own.. 


Itamtlon 


D. 


F-fdindcaMl.. 


s^^siss-?" 


1881 


rreapQblic. Botb 


Own.. 


TuuHon.... 


D. 


^^■ndrard.. 




















































































Pieepnblic 




Own.. 
































«!?SCt 


j 




























































; 1 

















































































































































































• Towashlp building. 



>L.OOg[C 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 101 

Puilie, School and Booiety Librariea in Uiohigan. — Continued. 





dor- 




Bi- 

year 
bX. 


Clr- 
bo^ki. 


Booke 
used lor 
refer- 


Librarian. 


Kemarki. 


•«l 


M 












No report to board! 

NorepSttoboard: 

No flpSft S board! 
No report to board. 

sSksS 

NSJ^ftwboart! 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board! 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


1! 
















t» 






















































SS 
























1 
















































IfO 

IS 

27 

i 


































































ss 
























22S 












„ 












u.ei2 

MO 






























900 
33S 


«) 


n.ioioo 




»,000 


Mr*. Zada Flake. 


M 


29S24 


20,Ut 


10.6«3 


RoaeE.Patenaude. 


















a 






























2.000 


1.000 


aeo.M»^>onald. 










No report to board. 
NoreJ^ttoboard. 


















a 




6» 




SO 


Henry E-Johnaon. 




No report to board! 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

nSJ^S to board! 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 




30 

249 












<»»l 






















<3 

set 

H 
N 














no 




















I 
























68 










































» 












No report to board. 


















■5 

TO 
«0 
«0 












No report to board! 


















































No report to board. 
No report to board. 














8a 








61 


Emma H. Squire. 






14 








No report to board. 


























».!?§(} R*""- 


, 













102 LIBRAET COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, Bohool and Society Libraries in Uiehigan. — Concihded. 



■rassac* 


^3 


ClaM. 


Reference- 


Own 

b"l"d- 

ing. 


Support. 


1 


Cktftlocne. 






































































































































































IMl 




































































































































































































































































SIfci::;;: 



















































































































I88t 


TDWUblp.. 


ClrcateUnK 




■Ikutlon 






g^S;K: ::::::::::■■■ 
























































































































































































































































itw 






BB.. 










To 






























































1 


' 




"^^iT- 



SECOND ANNUAL' REPORT. 103 

Public, School and Bomety Librariea in Miohigan. — Contihued. 



Vol- 

"1 


Pun- 
l>ec., 


as 


1 


bo^ki. 


™SS.. 


"S" 


Librarian. 


Remark.. 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

SJUSpSStobSSd: 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 






































































































20 
40 
AS 














































Jennie Cook. 




i» 










No report to board. 

No JegSrtW board! 
No report to board. 

NSHp^rttob^d: 

No report to board. 


i.m 








































10 










































































































































No report to board. 


















































No report W board! 
No report to board. 

No repass board! 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


































































































w 


















4S 

n 






















Hra.L.H.HIer. 












No report to board. 
No report to board! 

report to board, 
o report to board. 
report to board, 
o report to board, 
o report to board. 

No report to board. 

nS report » board! 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 






































as 




























































90 




























IB 






























































































































30 
174 


1T4 


Wm. F. Amiatning. 
Mr«.aa™hI«oe. 


















i£ 






No report to board. 








































^ 























104 LIBRARY COMMISSI OK ERS. 

Public, School atid Booiety lAbraries in Michigan. — CoRTiirora). 







































































I 






















School 


Beference. 


















































































IMl 


Bchooi 


RefateDoe. 


SB... 


































































lew 






Own.. 
Own.. 










School 


ClrculAtiiig 


TiMtlon 
















IKO 


School 


Reforenoe . 


SB... 














































































































































Stepbenaon, Daggett 


ifsr, 








Sub. Si enter. 
Sob. Si, enter. 






School 


Both 


Own.. 






MldbiDdCo.: 






















































































































































































































































1878 


Tovnafalp., . 


Circulating. 


Own.. 

































































































































^ B Scbool buildlug. 



i.,L,ooglc 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 105 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — CONnsUBD. 



Vol. 
ihclvee 


Pam- 
phleta 

ibel°ve« 


Book! 
added 

S; 


1 


for 


Clr. 
ealatton 


used for 
refei^ 
ence. 


Librarian. 


Remarki. 


















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
N.repon to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 






































IBB 

























































2 










Hoy wniett. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















26 
«0 


























■■•s 












No report to board. 






is 


« 


Emu Manoel. 


A 










ssgssg 


















13 

n 
























No report to board. 






tssw 






Feter Oarrlgan. 
Artbnr Balden. 




CO 


«D 






is" 






No report to board. 




• 






2S 


B.E.8«em. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


a 

N 
W 
















10 






















SB 








































1 - 
























w 




Principal. 
L.E.Bentlej. 


200 


«, 


nS n^n w boardl 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 




10 




















































::::|:::z::::::: 




J 




















No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


m 














«0 

7 










«l 








1 


30 

a 

G 
38 

































No report to board. 
























1 


No report to board. 














Jane Steveni. 




s 










No report to board. 

nSmpS" WboJd: 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 












« 




















3S 
SB 


























a 





















106 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERB. 

Public, School and Sooitty lAbrariet in Uichigan. — CoifTIKUED. 



^sx!i^i^^:^ 


i 
i 

It 


ClM>. 


IwfBreBce I or 
"^n^' ibulM. 
tog. 


support. 




Ckttlogue. 


M una Co.-C»n..- 






































































Pnrt« 


























































1 






































































1 




































































































































1 : 
















































































































































































"r,rD^f 






1 









































































































































































































































































































































Coogic 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 107 

Pahlie, Bchool and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Continued. 



umee 
Dec.. 


•belvei 


as 
S 


j 


Ex- 

book*. 


Clr- 
culatloR 

boom. 


Book* 

used for 
refer- 
ence. 


..„^.. 


Remarks. 




I 










No report to board. 
































Nore^rttoboard. 
kS report til board! 






s 
















































No report to board 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 














VJ 




G 




































No^^Htobrrd: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

nS report w board! 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
































3 












4B 
















40 














































































































• 












40 














X 




























,S 












No ™?Srt to bSlEd! 

No report U board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report (o boanl. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 






























































































1 












































































2i 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 

report to board, 
o report to board. 


































U 






































































report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















































g 
























































6 












































No report to board. 








' 





108 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Booietif Librariea in Michigan. — Continued. 



ronntr. cll7. iliebrlct, 
townahlporvlllaife. 


■6 

1 


ClUB. 


Relennce 


Own 
or 
ront 
band- 
ing. 


Support. 


u 


Catalopie. 


Mooroo Cn.~Con.: 
































































































































































































































































































































■ 




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































1 




























































Mil n inn 


[ 








1 

























































.Lioogic 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPOBT. 
Public, School and Sooietj/ Libraries in llUihigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 

Dec., 
IWl. 


ptleB 
Dec., 




, 


Ex- 

year 

booki. 


cuSSo- 
book^ 


Booki 
uaedfor 
refer. 


r,,».rt.». 


Bemarki. 






BO- 

4 










No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

NSrepSrtW board; 

No report to board^ 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 

NSrapSrtW board! 
No report to boanl. 

No^pSrtWb"rd! 

No report Mboa[d: 
No report to board- 
No report to board. 
No report to hoard. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 






















































































10 




























































































































































21 
31 





























































































2t 








































* 




























































• 
































































is 
























No report to board. 


















^ 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 


K 
















» 
























































No report to board. 
No.reporl to board. 
No report to board. 






















































1 








































No report to board. 


































No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 






















s 

IM 
























No report to boanl. 
No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 

No repSrtW boanl! 









































































110 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, Bchaol and Somety lAhrariea in Uickigan. — Contmoed. 



County, city, dlntriot, 
towDihip or village. 


1* 


Ckn. 


Hererence 

latlug. 


Own 

iDg." 


Support. 


■ 


OCalogue. 


Honroe Cn.—Con.: 




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































Scbool 


Dotb 


Own.. 
Own.. 


m.BDdBnu 








IBW 


































18BZ 


Townrtitp... 


atooUUng. 






















Bcbool 




an... 


lto.«ndllne. 




^''"*'' 


CiTital.D.l 


































































ffi 






Own.. 


Sabjcrlptlon. 










Cb^Uti^g 






























jj 


IBSI 






Own.. 








































































































Scbool 






















































































Sri*::;::;: 


leee ; Ladiu'iib'j 


ClTColatlng 


Rant. 


Bab.>ndflnt) 




rrinted 
















, , 



S B Scbool building. 



L;.jnz.,l.:yL.OOglC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPOET. HI 

Public, Softool and Soeietj/ Libmrie* in Michigan. — CoKTinOED. 



Vol- 
tune* 

IMl. 


pbleto 


Books 


1 


Ex- 
booke. 


CQlatioii 


Books 


Ubr&rlan. 


Benuirki. 


teo 
















No report to board. 






























iiSsEI 




































1 


















w 


























i 










No report to board. 

No report to board. 

N^repilrt to board: 
No report to board. 








































ifi 




















m 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report la board. 
No report to board. 

No"^"wbS^; 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




38 

1 








































2« 






































































































■"■'io6' 


m 












■M 


J 


"!S 


„ 


., 


Herman BchaOiler. 


















w 








Addle We*™w. 










MS 


134 


" 


' 


aoo 1 wi 


SB 


lAodra BlSMll. 






















Tl 
































No report to board. 


















1 « 




40 






joba Haekater. 
Clara Sbaonon. 




100 


100 






13 


M 

3 

4E 






















1» 




1 T6 


« 


«0 


Teacber. 




















23 




























Ma 




1 






No report to board. 
No report to board- 
















i 


» 




•4 


Beule HntohtnaoD. 






No report to board. 
















































M 
















3C0O| 78 




MaryV.BcbaiuaD. 


















' 




r 


^■oo'Jle — 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Society lAbrartet in Ifichi^n.— CONTINUED. 



CoaDtr, olty, district, 
townabiporrlllase- 


1* 


CUU. 


Reference 
orclrco. 
Mint. 


Own 

75 


Support. 




Ct-logue. 


Uontcalm Co.— Cun..' 










































































1 






























































ISTB 


School Clreulidng.' a B... 










































IBM 
















































































IHf» 


LadlM'llb-y ClnuUitlnK. 


Rent.. 






































1*91 
















































MuakeEonCo.: 




; 
























































Culiiova D 1 fl 




1 




































I1«U 


Towuiblp... CirmUtlng. 




'^''"" 




















































m 
















own.. 
Own. 










Townihip 






















TowDihIp... Ciroutating 




Tai.>Ddflnee 


















1880 


To-nrtl ■ ri«.„..r,« 


Rent. 


Fin. 






' 


Towmhlp... 


CI 1 H 


.'?^"°";;:::: 




Written 


m^Kt'- ■: - 







Rent, 


— ■■"V 




















1 








Mmkegon, city 

Muskegon, n.b 


'iwil'iaili'liihip.: 


cireuutlng.] :'.\\"\y reMiudflnn 






" 







,L.oogte 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPOBT. 113 

Public, School and Hoeiety Librariet in MKhigan. — Coktinited. 



Vol- 


Pud- 
pbleu 

■£'" 

IMl. 


Book! 

dur- 

,SI. 


1 


pended 
durlDg 


book*. 


refer- 
enoa. 


Ubrarlan. 


Bemarki. 






la 












Mo report to board. 
No report to board. 


























1 


Ln^ Van ijew. ' 






m 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 








































Wlib^r J. BJot^il. 
















Nn report to board. 






















' 


















m 


1«> 


Wm-A-Harria. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 












































I,«0 


MO 


J. K. Oofmaii. 












No report to board. 
No report to board! 
No report to boardi 






















































loo 
















tiODD 






Mr*. H. H. Bachmau. 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






M 


































n 


TO 


Barab Haor}-. 






W 






prepSSMb^: 
No report to board; 

No report tn boardi 
No report to board. 

No "pSrtW board! 

No report to board. 
















• 


131 




























































































»> 
























4* 


■■■= 










is' 


Mri. Dell V let*. 












No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 






















































1 




uo 




Mrs. Howard Potter. 

Cbaa. P. GraluuD. 
Jacob Ojler. 


9) 

asT 

2M 
30 

•n 
sn 
















B2 







2 




No report lo board. 




«i 




Urs. Maria E. Rake. 










No report to board. 






1 


300 


1 


Nellie Cleoiens. 




" 










No report to board. 








SOD 




H.C.FIotsii. 




' 




No report to board. 

No report to boanl. 
No report to boanl. 
So report to board. 





2,008 
























IIMI 


IM 




aarmtVanLoo. 


1 1 




,,L.ooak: 



114 LIBBABT COMMIBSI ONERS.' 

Public, School ond Society Libntriea iit Michigan. — Qosrumta. 



'sa,„°2-,'iss? 




CUu. 


RetereDce 


Own 

r«nt 
haUd- 

tog. 


Support. 


! 






































































1S»4 


Free public 




Rent. 






P-fd.ndc.rd.. 












IBT* 


Townihlp.. 


CltaalktlnK 


Bent.. I Tu. uid flnea 




























^■5Ll£^.^d%lifl 


IMl 


School 


Both 


Own.. 


Bub. and tu 




Written 






































School 

School";;:: 


Both 












1»9> 




































circDUtlii^ 










1900 










Sobonl 




SB... 


I>OD.«tocUla 






















SB... 


ssr-ri 








1BS9 




CirouUting 
















1900 






SB... 








































































































































































































Own.. 






















IWO School ClreutatlDg, 






























































































































1900 






Own.. 




















































iwo 













































S B School butldlng. 



L.oo^;;[c 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 115 

Public, School and Society LibrarUt in Uiohigtm. — Contibded. 



Vol. 


Pam. 

pblcM 

■€;r 


added 
dor- 


; 
■I 


Ex- 


3:: 


Book* 
UMdfpr 

rafer- 


Librarian. 










' 










No report to board. 
NSrepJIrtMboSJII: 






» 


















































so 


76 


K.C.SpauldtaK. 




ite» 




6 






No report to board. 








s.ow 




Un. Keleo I). Hedges. 




;::;:;:: 


13 


























... 


*M00 


6» 




C. L. Hurd. 
























?' 


















39 




42 16 






Cba..L.Jone>. 

Hammon Field. 
Teauber. 




» 


« 
















No report to board. 










IM 




L. E. Mills. 
Amanda K. Swanaon. 

Geo. Bhepetd. 














j 


36 






2 


















300 






Bertha Day. 

John Rhea. 




2W 1 


31! 


186 


No report to board. 


1 






30 




K.M.Yoang. 


iz 




























26 
























No report to board. 






7 






















































;;;;;;;; 


16 










M 








1 


\-o to board 


























Noreponloboard. 
No report lo board. 


























Orson Hodge. 






23 










Ko report to board. 








2i 




BlfEKS;.. 










10 
















No report lo board. 








1140 






Faul Akershook, 
Maud Rrltton. 


-0 


■'■■ a 












9 










No report to board. 












Prari-lauolies. 
Neva Barks. 

F, H. Davis. 






ss 


M 








IS 
































No report to board. 








ra 


40 


c'aJZ'"- 




■::::::;l | 














No report to board. 












June Wilbur. 
K-T'-WrbineL 


32 

12 








No report to board. 








Sq report to board. 













116 LIBRARY OOHMISSIONEBS. 

Public, School and Sooietj/ Libraries in ifiahigan. — CoHXiNnKD. 



"Kn-;!!;.!;.!.::;:: 


WOO 

ISSS 


iaS::;::: 


CircnlatlDB. 


9B... 
Own.. 
SB... 


DOnktlOBE.... 








ESiley' D8 




ClroDUtlDg 


Snb.«nd fines 










































iHn 


School 


Retenoce.. 


Own- 


































1900 








Sub. *nd don. 






t D i 






























im 






SB... 


!£?..■"; 
























II 


im 














































1901 






























1900 


















Own.. 
Own.. 








SBFis------- 


Sobool 




Subtcrlptlon. 




Prlnled 




















1098 




ClrcnUtlng. 

SKSffil; 


SB.... 

Si.: 


asc-'s 






iSSr";;;;;::; 


iKlSSM,;; 




WtltWn 
























1 flrhnnl 


Circulating 
















Own.. 






















































Rent. 














































AddHon.p.8 IMS 


























J 


































































































iwe 


Behool 


Cireulallog 


Own- 


































1»0 


Sohool 


ClrcaUUng 


Own.. 


SubMrtpllon. 
































































ClrculatlDg 


Own.. 

Own, 










IIW7 
























1 










( nnnir 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Booitty lAbrariet in Miohigan, — Continced, 



Vol- 




Booka 
added 


£ 


515 

books. 


Cir- 
culstloii 

booke. 


Book* 
ueedfor 
refer- 


Ubnnan. 






» 


s 




SBH 


IT 


10 


gj^'^r""- 














ioe 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 




































" 








* 


40 


RaaelBartoD. 










iiS^SSM: 




















* 


' 






M 


2S 


Carloi Smiih. 








No nport to botrd. 

No report tn board. 
No report to board. 


















1* 






.'.. 


T JB 


M 
K 


^ 


W. K. Mead. 
L. B. Alleo. 




























*. 








ze 


M 


Oraoe RTerKto. 




m 






No report to board. 


, 






43 




Channcey 0. MlUer. 






IS 


' 


40 00 










" 
















No report to board. 
No report to board. 














1 




IB 00 
800 


271 


BS 

ZTl 


Teacher. 






s 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 
















6 


I 






u 




I..J.BnDker. 








lie 








» 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 


































20 




2S00 




in 


LoDle Fuller. 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 


































20 


m 


Jerome Arnold. 












No report to board. 

report to board. 
report to board. 
report to board. 

report tobSEd! 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


M 




1 






































































as' 


M 

2 
40 
























1» 




30 00 ' lie 


141 


Birtha Seeley. 




3 


s 












I 




1 


BaeU Anten. 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 

No report to board. 




















le 














1 








u 










E.J. HDbbard. 








^'»! 












No report to board. 

.no. 








1 ' 


;■■■: r 



118 LIBRARY COMMI88IONBHS. 

P-itbtia, School and Society Libraries in Miehigait. — CosTimiED. 



Cnunty.olty. dlHiict, 
towiublporyllUge. 


1* 


CM. 


or clrcu- 

UdDg. 


Own 


Support. 




Catalofno- 


OBkUDd Co.-Cd».,- 
















^mjnltonlD.Jfl... 


im 


Free public. 
School 

Bcbool 


RcrvTSDoe , 
Circulating 

cVrc'iiiatine; 

ClrcDlatlng 


Own.. 


T*x. ud finsB 
Taxation 








FinnlngWD, D. 6 


ian' 


















































s!|!!!K3;S:r::::::: 




School 


ClrCDhttlDg 


SB... 


Sub.andflnM 




































































SaiSW:::: ::::::; ■ 


a 


Sch 1 1 


Own.. 


Social 








PaMandBnea 








































18W 
1890 


Bohool ! 












School : ClroutaUnB 


SB... 


















isw 




Own.. 


















1891 




Own.. 






































































































School 




Chirn.. 




















ISM 






























s 

18K 


Fre^uwic. 

Bohoil 

School 


Rereranue .. 


OWQ.. 










Bulwcriptlon 
Bubsprlptlou . 






































rSSJ'^'^h"' "!'"'''■ 


1M3 


Lkdiea'lib'y 


ClrcnUCiiiK. Own.. Sub. kndfliiM 


i>. 


V't'd and rard.. 




















1 






































iiir. 1 sihwii 


Circulating. Own ., 






























l^l""' 












Refrrenne.. » U .. 








Vr^-^t 



























































.L'OOg Ic 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 119 

Publio, Bohool and Booietg Librariea i4 Michigan. — CONTUtlTED, 



▼ri- 
nmM 

Dto.. 
laol. 


pbijn 
abelvei 


s 




darinjc 

5:. 


Clr- 
bi^ki. 


Book! 
aiedfor 
refer- 


Llbmriao. 


Remarks. 


















No raport to board. 




M 










120 


UoUle Lyncb. 










30 








IS 






Ni report to board. 






•«7M 

000 


1,»M 




J.L.WlilteFlBr«)n. 
LewUTenTah. 




as 








Ni report to board. 
N> report to board! 


























































N a report to board. 
Ni report to board. 




















20 
























N^»^^t^b^: 














M 


30 

DO 








3,766 


30 


leinmB Oen* Oanigr. 




!.«« 


T 




20 00 












10 












N J report toboJd: 
























Walter Hewetl. 
M. J. Reed. 




w 


























\] report to board. 
N J report to board. 


li 




10 




10 00 


IT 


17 


Teaober. 


TO 






2S 


30 


Fred BourB.. 






X 






N 3 report to board. 
S D report to board. 














































N 1 report to board. 














1 


















'. 


i 


1 








Raj K. Allen. 












N > report to board. 






*u 


" 










63 






\ ) report to board. 














8H8 

as 

10 


soo 




IHMW 


4,610 




Mary E. Kluan. 
Maad l-arker. 
O. A, GWdinBi. 

Beule Blaolej. 












Ifi 


as 




e: 


so 




S£i 




n 

3,000 










30 


i3e 




100 00 


ZOO 










•« 1 roport to board! 
N} report to board. 














„ 1 „ 
























1..S? 








































EmmaDoel Qennan. 




w 
in 

30 












s J report to board! 


















4S 




CbM. Bilkovrty. 
Jame> H. AtkinKiIi. 




M 


■Y 


16 37 
















1 






30 








So report to lioard. 
























N 9 report CO board. 

I .nnalc 

















LIBBABT COMMISSIONERS. 



Public, iSohoot and Sbcietg Librarita ui Michigan. — CoNimuED. 



County, citr, dlitrfct, 
towMhJpSrvlll^: 


1 
s 


C1«M. 


or oircn- 
Utlng. 


Own 

b"ud- 
Ing. 


Support. 


1 


Caklogae. 


0«kl»iidCo.-Con..- 


itet 


Scbool 


ClrcaUtliw. 


8B... 
































Wb« Bloomaem, D, 1. 


IIM 




Both 


SB.... 






Written 




18*7 


iSS::;::: 


Both 


Own.. 
Own.. 


















































Oc'eutt Co.: 


















































1901 


KM""'"- 


Clrontotiog. 


8^:: 








a«r Bink»,D.i 




















SKf- 


CironUClDic 


owi::: 










1S»T 




















































































lew 






SB... 




















IBM 


Bcbool 


Reforence.. 


Own.. 


Sab.AioaitlB 


















8B... 












Townsblp... 


Circulating. 




















Fe D 1 


1883 


ftchnnl 




Own.. 








Fertj.D.a 






















1B8G 


School 


Reference.. 


SB... 
































































INl 


TowDiblp.. . 




■ 


















l^ 


TowMlilp.. , 




, 


l^..n.l.ne. 














a-S".?::: »°";::::::: 


Kont.. 
Own- 


^^^tS^. 








































W» 


School 
























IST8 
188fi 


iss^r- 


Clii'QUting. 














anbieriptlon. 
T«.»nS8ne< 












Own.. 
Rint.. 










Clrontating. 












B 


Township... 


Clmd&tlng. 
Relere&oe .. 


bb!;: 


80b.kDdt>x. 




















S 


Free public 




Kent.. 



































.LiOOQle 



S B School building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 121 

Pulilie, School and Society Libi-aries w Uichigan. — Continueo. 



Vol- 


Pam- 


S 

*. 


1 


year 
book.. 


± 


^" 




Bemarka. 






. 




t3 90 






Habelie PhUllpi. 










No report to board. 
No report to bo«d. 




















18 


81 




14 00 






Eleanor Orove. 








Ko report to board. 




W 


M 




700 






?S£.V- 


A 


M 


M 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















S 

2S 










0UTeE.8tJm«ai>. 












No report to board. 
Mo report to board. 






























12 00 


'■"S 


STB 
K 


R^^iiieb.u;^^. 
KatCtoHajee. 
















jmu Packard. 




' 


1 






6 


» 










S;SW£te3: 

Mo report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 




































































iu 


• 










R.E.BontbwJck. 












No report to board. 








10 


28 


ErmaHUIer. 












No report to board. 






II 










M^^R. Trail. 








i42 


















No report to board. 






> 




SOO 




12 


EeTlTltSr"*'- 






















No report to board. 






8 








IB 


g:£:^''"- 












g 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















n 


















400 


400 


Absalom Salubnrr. 






' 






No report to board. 


HOD 






30 




Mrt. H. 8. Bboada. 
Henry Ricbman. 


















40 




DBOO 
TOO 


'■«* 










20 






i 




No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















80 




IraVanaken. 




















iii 


m 






' 






















' 










TO 


200 
















No report to board. 












io 








. » 


" 


' 


800 














No report to board. 




2 


10 

le 




















ii 












No report to board. 

I .(inn r 








1 



LIBBART COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Booiet]/ Librariea tn Michigan. — CosriBtTED. 



Coant;, cl^. dbtrlot. 
townUlp or vUUce- 


i 
I-" 


CU«. 


°tatli™' 


Own 

rest 
boUd- 

Ing. 


Support. 


1 


Catalogue. 


Oc»nft Co.— Con..- 




Free public 


RerereDce.. 












































ClrcohktlDg 


Rent.. 


































'ism' 


Bcbool 

TownBhip... 


Both 

Cirool»tlng 


Om.. 


8.b«nption 












OEemawCo.; 


























































































































































Free public 


Bolb 


SB... 


Few and flnn 






0..„UC.: 


IBM 
























School 


CircutatlnB 












1M6 


Own.. 
















1«M 


tS""!*! ■" 


Bo"> 


Own.. 


TucBudBuee 




























































188! 


TOWDlbip... 

Free public. 


Clrcnlitlng 


♦ 








































































































Reterence.. 

ClrcnUting 


Own.. 
B«nC.. 




























1W6 


Free public. 


ClrcnlMlng 


Rent.. 


FeeeuidQne* 




























1888 


Township... 


ClrcnUting 


Rent- 
































hi 












































law 


FreepuiHlo. 


ClrcaUUii». 


SB... 














































































S B School building. 


■T^ 


wnablp clerk 


BolDce. 


Town 




„l. 





SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 123 

Public, School and Soeiety lAbrariea in Michigan. — Continued. 



nmet 

•Wvei 
Dec., 
19D1. 


Puu- 

sfaalvei 


Book! 
Added 


j 


i! 


cnlatlan 


Book* 
need for 
rerer- 


Ubrartan. 


Bemarke. 






20 





K»00 




600 


E.N. Pl'tkln. 








No report to board: 














1,008 




OG 




HI 00 






M^.C.E.Eaii». 






No report to board. 






























19 


Ju-CarKlU. 
































No report to board. 


















200 

I,BJT 
















No report to board. 
No report lo board. 


















100 






















No report to board. 
No report to board. 
































1ST 
























No report to board. 




2m 




ato 


800 




O.A.PittB. 




27 








No report to board. 










200 




H. H. PlQB. 

Mr..J.F.Min»h. 


» 


w" 


ao' 




low 


24 


No report to board. 




8 


DOW 


200 




Teacher. 
D. A. Davie. 


















No re n to board 


















No report to board. 




























1,000 




L-B-CurtlM. 
Adelbert Kanooee. 








BE 




low 




























No report to board. 




























... 













j 




























07 


12 
2S 

SO 










A. G. Stead. 
Mre.MarjE.aeavet. 




«« 




IS OS 


boo! 300 








3100 




Itvln Cluue. 




















1 




Noreiiorttoboard. 






m 




«Goa 






Mre.J. F. KaU. 
Wm. E. Alleo. 
A.A.CuilclE. 

C. H. Faller. 






W 








i 

IT 




las 








00 
























No report lo board. 


m 


1 


187 


loo 


100 


£.0,Reee. 














No report to board. 










































( nnn lr> 



124 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Publie, School and Sotnety Lihrariea >n Michigan.— Coxtutued. 



StI^'d sii 


'"" 














































OacodkCo.: 




















SSKS"; 














leas 




Rent.. 






































,m 


FrM public 




own.. 


















































































































\S 


Towuihlp... 


Circntattag. 


^ 















































18M 






Rent.. 




































LM to D J 




















Towiuhlp... 

iiwiiihip,:: 


ClrcateUiig 
cVr'niitattag. 


Own*.: 


'iiiJiiidnnM 








"isTB 




■— ^ 


OttaraCn.: 




































































































ChMWr'DBfl 





























































































































































































































































































































































S B School building. 



\ SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 125 

Pabtio, School and Society Libranee in Michigan. — Continued. 



Vol- Pam- 
Dme. 1 pblete 

•helye»!ehelvee 
Dec., 1 Dec, 

im. 


Book* 
added 
dor- 


1 

1 


El. 


Cir- 
books. 


Book! 
uwKor 
rerer- 


Llbnrian. 


,^^. 


1 




» 




nam 


V 


60 


Edwin Defreer. 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 
































64 
i 


















n 
les 




Hra. Bin Bine. 
JoaepblueTomllwoD. 


W2 : 




BM 


tos 


SI^'WKK. 




















JBW 






IrwlD H. Elmbalf . 








No report to t>oard. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 


















Bt 










































































fleorge SkelloD. 












'l 














No report to board. 
No report to board. 






08 
















17B 




Ht*. Hector McVannel. 






! 








No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 


































1,61! 




Daniel n.HdtohlDa. 






M 








No report to board. 








!U0 




Blmejr Dutton. 




















» 




















No report to board. 




















10 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 








































nS report wbSSrd: 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 




















12 






















































1. » 












































No report to board. 

No report lo board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board^ 






















£ 








laabel H. ThomioD. 


































« 












































1 






















































1 ' 



126 UBRAEY COMMISSI ONE E8. 

Pubtio, Suhool and Society lAhrariet in Uiehigan. — CoimRDED. 



CoudV. clt7, district, 
townahip or vlllice- 


i* 


CtaH. 


Rttenoce 
latlDg. 


Own 

buUd- 
ing. 


Support. 


s 

1 


CatKk^na. 


Ottawa Co.— ron..- 
Juneatown, D.S. 














oiilSS:*"'::::::::: 

011v«,D.T 


















; 






























































































































































1 










































































































ffliit?:.':;;;:;;:;; 






















































































1 






















































































































P«.^«e^,,eCo.: 






1 




















































































































































Tovmsblp... 


ClrCDlBtlDg. 




! 












































Rent- 


■»"■""»•■ 

















h:,L.OOglC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT, 127 

Public, Bohool and Sooiety Librariea in Uiehigan. — Continued. 



Tol- 




Boom 
added 
dnr- 


£ 




book!. 


refer- 
ence. 


Librarian. 






:::::::: 


» 












No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to bo«wd. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to hoard. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

NSISpSntSboart: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report lo board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report (Aboard. 

No report to board I 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


























3BJ 

i 



















26 






































40 







































2 
























i 






























I 












































I 





























* 












































































w 





























68 




































' 














1 






















No report to board. 






IG 




















No report to board. 










■m 






1 














































20 

28* 








No report to board. 










18 




; 


i 


No report to board'. 






M 








ko report to board. 










H.W.Tbonii. 
























1 


1 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 






30 
























No report M board. 








> 


1 
1 


























HrB-M.J. HItcheoclt. 














No report to board. 












lOS 


1-6 1 Patrick Kenny. 















,L.oogle- 



UBBART OOMISISSIONBRS. 
Publio, Behool and Sooiety Libraries in Michigan. — CoNTmuzD. 



"I^^^i^^^ 


1- 


ClM*. 


"»ttoS"' 


Own 
bii- 

Ing. 


Support. 


_ 


C»«loguft. 


«^Kr?:: 




















































































































































































































































































































































































School 


Clrcutating. 


Oiii.. 




































































































































































































































FTMpabllc 


ClroulatlDg 




















































































































































































Freepablle 


























s;s*^:». 




aub 










































































' 

















rrtroDgte 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 129 

Public, School and Somety lAbmriet in Uiohigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 
nmai 
on 
■helvet 
Deo., 
1901. 


phlst; 
ibelTei 


JSSS 

dur- 


1 


tor 
bofk. 


»- 

oulatlon 
boSki. 






Remarks. 
































No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No E^rtw board! 
No report lo board. 
No report to board. 

NSrep^ftW board! 

o report to board, 
n report to board. 
o report to board. 
o report to board. 

No E^rtM board! 
No report to board! 

No report to board. 






















































:;::::::l:;:::::: 






















2 








































10 
«M 
123 




































































IB 




























































386 
324 
113 




10 


























« 




Mn. W. H. Devanj. 












10 










































' 
















NoreJSrttoboard. 






























1 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 












ST 






























18 




Edward Meeker. 












No report to board! 

No HpSftW board! 

No report to board. 

N^rep^Sw board! 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 


31 












I 












2 










: 




























20 
























178 












Ji-S 




320 








«S,W8 


Harriet H.A^e.. 










No report to board. 




2 








Violet O. Levis. 










No report to board. 






















3 























































130 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Society Librariet in Michigan. — Cohtinued. 



rniinty, filtj, <11 strict, 
town<blp «r vlltog.. 


1 
I* 


CUM. 


Reference 


0*D 

his. 

IBB- 


Sapport. 


1 


CalcKUC. 


"'iS'^wVs:'"'- 






■ 












































































































































































?l££'-"S;S;i:::. 
















































St.Cl>irCo.: 


isoi 






Ova.. 






















IB99 
UM 
I8S9 


Hiii;;:;;; 


S??i 


B:. 


IffiSSJS 
















P-fd«naM^.. 










































































o™.. 








































































MO 


g^SS :::;:: 


ClrcnlMIiig 


%^:: 

H-:-; 




















Cltcnlktlag 
















1^^ :::::: 


CInralatliig 


aub.>ndfliM. 






Cuco 






IBM 


tfnwpnWlo 


ClrentotiDg 






































1887 
1897 


School 

School 


Both 

drcnUtlUE 


Own.. 
Own.. 
























1898 


Bohool 


ClrcDUllng 


Own.. 


Tui. ond finei 














1892 
189T 


School 










Claj.D.*. 


BoUi : SB... 
















1M« 
1898 


School 

Bobool 


CircnlatlOK.j Owd.. 


Iki-UKlBnM 






















1898 

1894 

1898 


School 

School 

School 

School 


CtrcDhtUiig.l 

Both 1 Own., 








Sli™i>SI;D;*fl::::!: 






























im 


































Co a, 

















S B School building. 'Townililp clerk's office. 



I Bntertslnmenti »ni) Rnel. 



LiOOglC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 131 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Contikueu. 



Vol. 


Pam- 
pbleu 


Booki 

"M. 


i 




Cir- 


Book! 
refei^ 




Reniarka. 
















No report Ui board. 
No report to b<Mrd. 



































12 

It 










No report to board. 






















No report to board. 

N2repS"tobo»rd: 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to lioard. 


































12 

2S 


































































!■. 


SO 


1 




IS 


Ida Gilbert. 










No report tu board. 


TB 


H» 


TI 


14 


B. Hlanche Flowere. 






30 






I 


1 


No report to board. 
No report t..l««rri. 
No report to board. 

NSJ^rttobSlJd: 
















» 
































7. 


» 


12 i..., >«. 


m 


01 


N. Maude l>earc«. 










































Noreimrltoboard. 


M 


..' 




M 




Kleola MuLane. 


U 




33 


BOO 
IBOO 


38 








32 


32 












No report U> bc«rd. 








200 


SE 






J 


2 


























m 


00 


Albert Radlke. 
Erneet F. Lamont. 






13 


18 «a 






100 






Mo report to board. 


431 




3T00 


200 


400 


Albro Q. Qatei. 








SO 


30 


JohnTaft. 
.TenDlB M. Roacb. 






















No report to board. 






soo 






oio.'Al'S^n?"'*' 








«T 
















No report lo board. 


m 


Ml « 


3 


2M 

eoD 

400 
146 


li? 


70 
100 

00 


rd^L^V-^^^- 
Rlcbar<l Caugbell. 


■* 


M 


No report to board. 






1816 






John C. School. 








No report to board. 
No report to hoard. 



























132 LIBBAET 0OMMIS8IONEB8. 

PuMie, Bekool and Society LibrarUt m Michigan. — Continued. 



Count;, cit;, district, 
towniihlp or village. 


i 
i 
■s 

1* 


CtaM. 


Retereuce 


Own 

iss. 

log. 






CklaloKne. 


a«. a«lr Co.—Om.: 


im 


School 

School 


ClrcaUUns 


ah." 








Tuc. and flnei 












































































MOO 






OWD.. 




















Own.. 




































































i 










SS,S» ■"■.':::::; 




Own.. 


i^.uidaDea 




































i . . .. 












low 




Own.. 




















Scbool i ClrcDlattnB 
























1» 




Own., 


Don. and lub. 




Printed 










!S:ltit;:'S??" 












Own- 
Own.. 


FeMuiddOB. 










































































































































































































































































































































, 



BSuhoot building. 



vLiOOglc 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 133 

Puhlio, Sehool and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Continued. 



1 

Vol- P»D1- 

nmn | pbleta 
Dec.. 1 Dec.. 


5 
,Sf. 


i 




Cli- Book. 

culation used for 

of ■ refet- 

boolu. aoc*. 


LIbnriaD. 


._.. 


i 








22 10 


Mrs. Warren Butler. 












No mpon to boaril. 

.\o report t.,bi«ni: 

No report to bonnl. 
No report to board. 
















■? 










99I 


, 






























Jmiim J. Keimnl}'. 


w 

1 














No report to h.«rd. 

NoreiwrttohcAnl. 

N"feK'rtwl™rfi: 

No report tfil-mr.i. 
No reiHirt to botu^. 

No report to boaru. 

No report to boaril^ 
No report to board. 


e; g 




tl w 




U 


Lena Dec ring. 


: 1. . " 












































1 






















Te«her, 






























■al ' ■a 




1 






» 






















» 






* 










»o„p.,..„«.,U. 


10 








30 




















iSl 








K! 1 1 71 


16S 

US 


u 


sari^r'- j 


2*0 










No report U> br>ar<i. 
No report to boarrl. 
No report to hoanl. 

NoreiHirttoboard. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to b,«rJ. 

No report lo hoard! 
Nortp-rttolKwrd, 
So retiort lo luiaril. 

No report to board. 

No report to iHinnl. 
No rt|wrt lo board. 

NSflpSnKlHBrd! 
Noreiwrttnbnard. 

report to iiunril. 

report to board. 
reiwrt to Imard. 

No report tu boanl. 
NSrSpS«SlI^! 


































1 








«7 




16 


































16 
















































1 ^ 






















1 














































i ' 
































"::::^i u 
































• i 








M 










18 

M 













































eegte 



134 LIBEARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Soaiely Librariet in Miehigan. — CoimKUED. 



Cniinly, city, dUtrlut, 
township ..r village. 


i 
1 


aua. 


Reference 


Own 

rent 
build- 
ing. 


Support. 




Cktalogue. 


St (■Ulrto.-tton..- ' 
































































































































im 


Svbiwl 




a B... 






































BoCh 


Own.- 








|j|!^K:}|:::::::::- 






























1 




















































































j 
























































. 


1 


















































































































i . 














































































































































































































































[ 

























































SECOND ANNUAL REPOET. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — ConriNU^. 



Vol 

■helvei 
Dec.. 
ISM. 


pbleM 

•helve. 
Dec., 


1 


Ex- 
pended 
during 

r/ 

booke. 


culatlon 
booka. 


"S' 


Librarian. 


Reniark>. 






3 




























































1 























































12 




MM 




12 


Benton Oabome. 








e.0 




38 


Elva 6. Hoore'. 
















* 




























W 










































« 
























































3 
























































K 












3K 


















































































1 




























« 




































No report to boar.l. 






» 


















3 






No report lo board 

No report to board 
No report to boan 

NoJepSnSb^n 
Ko report to board 

NorepSftWbSlfil 


























28 




































30 




1 




















t 
















Ko report to boarcj 
No report lo bnarrl 

NorepSnWb«"l 

No report to board 
No report to boar-l 
No report to boanl 
No report to board 










33 




























6 


































































r"""-:::vL 



136 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Coiitinued. 



'S-D'.&lpSr'viriS^e'' 


It 


Clau. 


"uHn's"" 


Own 


-"■ 


1 


Catalogue. 


SWoieph Co.-Con..- 




' 






















sSissli---' 






































































Kt^»^i 




























































































































































































































SlSI's;---' 












































































































TU. uid floe* 












































1 








































1 




























































































































































Free public. 














































, - - - ^\ 



.Coogic 



SECOND ANNUAL BEPORT. 137 

Public, School and Society Libraries in ifichigan. — Co^ttinued. 



ibelTeslihelvee! ,"t' 
Dec, 1 Dec., „'!* 
IMl. 1»0I, . '■"■ 



books. I ence. 



»i ■ L. 


1 


1 






^ ■ 1 12 •-■-| ' 








f » i 




















■ 1 






















1 




















1 






























' 




































»« 1 i« |3» 1 S,3H 












1 ■ 1 








































M ^ 1 1 
















mi.:::.' .' \ :...i 





,X'Obg[c 



138 UBRABY COMUI8SIONBR8. 

Pablic, School and Boeieig LibrarUa in Michigan. — Coktihued. 



'S&S'SiT^- 


1 

1? 


CIlM. 


Re(«rence 


bnUd- 
ing. 


8upp«rt. 


i 


Catslopic. 


Bt. JoMpb Co^Con.- 




1 












n««publla 




































































SanlUicCn ; 


1W4 


Free public 
























IBM 


Ftre public 




















SBSsrsSSSig:!::: 


mi 

"lB«' 

ll«J 


ISSS::::: 


ClreolMIne 
















BoelTD.l... 


'Frcepiibl'ic 
School 


ciraiilmVlng: 
Cttculktlng 


owii'.: 


&'ii''""' 












D 










IBUO 


FrMpubVte 
Townihlp.. 


aars 


Bant.: 




































SSS!:;;S:S;;:::;:::: 




i ' 


















































^''*°' 


Cln^Iatlng 


















isra 






Own.. 
Own'.: 


Tuution 






School!;::: 


































isec 


School 


CIronUttns 


Own.. 
















Marion, U.lfl 

Marlon. D, 3 fl 


IRH 
1*»T 


xchool 

School.:... 


CireSlMtM 


9 B... 
Own.. 


Fine* 

Fines 







Marlon, 0.411... 
Harlena, D.s... 
Marietta, D.4. . 
Harlacie, T 



.1 Sub. anil tai..l. 



^ulaUDg.' Own... Fines... 
. ....jsalaling. Own..i ~ ' 

School Own.. 

Sohooi S B...I niaUon... 



, acbnol Clrcalaling., 



n.sa 1 School... 



wT^iDg 



'MhlDgton, U. 2 11.. 



School BotI 



. CIrcalatIng, s B ,. Fines... 
. ClrcnUtlng. Rent.. Fine*... 



hX-ooglc 



SECOND AKNUAL REPORT. 139 

Public, School and Society Libraries in Uichigan. — Contihocd. 



■helvM 
D«c., 


S 




ciu^rlng 
books. 


1 1 












j 1 






3,MT 






..,!::'r,l....":™.i 






76 
































:::;:::: 














10 




















































306 




1. 




tion 


3ae 


260 1 Andrew HcLacbUn. 






























IB 


10 Michael H.»chl»tre. 






























^^Jlif.^'- 






IS 








30 
































Wm. Jollet'. 
Divld C. fierdan. 






i' 


20 




20* 


BO 






















J;feS."- 


























■a 










„ 


















































































No report to boacd. 
No repprl to board. 


























206 


1 * 




2K 




■JH 


Abgut HcLewl. 
T. S. Ciimuiinife. 




■ aio 








jS 


's a 




1 as 2S 


■a 


Ralpb W. CodillngtoD. 




" 








No report lo board. 
No report U- board. 




io'i 10 

1 












< 




M 


Zfl 


Anaon K. Dar«e. 






No report to bi>»rd. 


39 


* 






ne 


C.J.MedcaK. 
Alvin Key"' 




1 "" 










1 » 


71 moo 








18 




















- 






JobD W. SmltU. 

JolinJ. 8»leroy. 
A. W. Rice, 












1 










»<. 




100 








» 




No report to board. 






















22 


■■■■■«■ s 












13 00 


iS ^S 


Jai. C. Ragan. 

"■'"""■ ( 
















,ooqW 



140 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, Softool and Sooietg Librariea in Uiehigan. — CosTiNum. 





:::::: 












?s!^li;.- 


























SclKWlcmftCo.: 






' 


























































































































































' 










































19O0 
188» 










Lid^s'Uli") 


SiS;^;; 








Frfl"3'g*5; 






FeeondHnea 






















































IMO 




ClrcuKilDl. Rent. 


SocUtt, Bnei 






















8c'booi ' cirCDtatinB.i 
















1 


; i 




















ieii* 


School 


areototlnB. Own.. 








>:e«H»v«n.D.Stl 


'nui.'andnneB 






- 








iS 


i^tz\ 


R;ferenoe..|C™rn.. 
























Y. M.C.A. 




Uueaandflnn D. 




O«o«>o.city 


i«i 


Frlnltd 




l»B5 


Scbool 


^i^s»!°"- 


Ill 

mt 














, Own.. 

Ref«eiic«.. Own.. 














Tu.uidflnM 








ficbool 












■.... 



















• Enurlai omenta, dueaand flnea. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. HI 

Public, School and Society Lihrariea in Michigan. — Costinoed. 



Vol- 
umes 

Dec, 
IWl. 


shelves 
D«., 

1»M. 




'. 


El' 
boSks. 


Clr- 
culatloD 


"1' 


Librarian. 


Remarks. 
















Teacher. 
Maud Baker. 






100 


ii 




110 00 








m 






































































































» 












No report to board. 
nS report to boafd! 

NS™pSrttoboanU 
No report In board, 

N^repSn to board! 

No report to board. 

NSE^tttoboSJd: 

No report to board. 


















































15 



















































































:;:^: 


s 

15 






























«• 


:.' 


20 00 
4S00 
13 8S 






William Parker, 
Hattle E. Holt. 

William Kllllan. 




i.Mo 






« 










18 










No report to board. 
































I 












No report to board. 














36 




10 




400 






Lilly Merrlce. 












i 


\ 










No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 


*J 




I TO 


BO 


50 


Tboroas H. Bonsor. 


ra 


ii 

00 

200 

5 


13 

1 
























•4 




BOO 


as 


32 


Victor Haugbtou. 












Minnie MagoBn. 














No report to board. 






in 






H.W. aplller. 
Tlttddeas H. Bnseell. 

Mr».K.A.Todd. 

C.V.Johnson. 
F. H. Ruib. 
Sellna Harris. 






47 












30 




4.MS 
M 


162 












BOO 

!S 

196 
200 


20 








10 




» 


SI::: 


30 






60 




















No report to board. 

















143 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Society Librariet in Michigan. — Co^tdiued. 



Connlv. clly, district, 
towniblp or vllli«e. 


iij "- 


"toM^r 


Own 
butlrl- 

IDR. 


Support. 


i 


C*Mop,f>. 


Sbl.w««eCo._Co»..- 


1 












































IMB 


Scbool 


CtrcoJitiDg 


SB... 
















































































































































































































































iHvg 


School 


arcnlatlng 


Own.. 


SocbUg, flnm. 




cua 




































it)9e 


School 


circotatini 


SB... 


ii^.uidaDei 


























































V 
































































TuMOta Co.: 












































































































































































































































































































































































-tTDDgtC 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Hichigan. — CONTINUED. 



Dec., 




i 


rear 

bo^k., 


boolu. 


Booke 


Llbnrlan. 


Renuirhi. 




1 












No report to board. 




1 38 

« 

■:::::::!- ^ 




























■"'"«» 






Taacher. 








No report to board. 

No°Je?SSSg 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 

























































:' : ; 












40 










































* 




























^' 1 I 












So^^^l:^: 

No report to board. 
















4 
















631 
3N 






Donald MoKay. 


« ' 1 ' 




« 




^! ' I 




« 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 


















i-e 






CharlOkUatl. 


140 1 


lo'.... 










120 

a* 












No™firtlobt«d: 

No report to boardl 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 










































:::'::;: 


25 
10 





















































































11 




































No ^rt to board. 
So report to board. 
No report to board. 














































j 




































































! 


































42 


























1 




No report to board. 






IT 





















13 
























39 






















, 



LIBRARY OOMHISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Socielg Librari«» in Michigan. — Coktiroed. 



SIEKS;^:?:;::;;::::: 






















































1 






















































S!E&S:S;::::::: 








































j 














&"JSSyeid;.-i.Vj::::-. :::::: 


































llfcgj: 




1 








■ 










































J 






1 1 




iiiS&s;;:;::;: 




















ToMota.D.Tfl 

ThwouIt 






j 


























1 ! 










































; 












































School j Clreotatine 





























D., Written... 



ArllUBton, D. 1 11... 



l^yLlOUglC 



SECOND ANNUAL EBPORT. 145 

Publie, Sohocl and Soeiety Libraries >» Uichigan. — Continued. 



Vol- 


I^C., 


ffiS 

dor- 

,SI. 


i 


during 
booke. 


Cir- 

books. 


1 
"ISre*"! Librarian. 


^^^. 














No raport to board. 
No report to board. 






70 
























1ft 










No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

So report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report lo board. 




























































IS 












































































10 
























M 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 






































T6 








































































No reESrtm board. 

No report to board. 
No report lo board. 

No report to board. 
No report Co board. 
No report to boanl. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 

No report lo board! 
No report lo board. 
No report lo board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report lo board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 






3 








































































77 




























































































1 












































3S 




























138 








































10 




























2 






























1 












No report lo board. 






























No report Co board. 
No report to board. 






































300 






W. L. NeHon, 








No report lo board. 
No report to board. 




























< 


7S00 


IfiO 




Nellie Maxaru. 






No report lo board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 







































LIBBART COMMISSIONERS. 



Public, School and Sociely Libraries in Michigan. — Codtirded. 



a 
Conntj. city, dlitrtcl, £ 


Clux. 


Rofaronce , or 

1 


BDpport. 


! 




V»n Buren Co— Con.; ] 




1 
















SolMcrlptloD. 












tJisfSS'g-; 


1 






























































































^ngor.D 






















































































IWT Freepublif 


ClTCUlKtlDg. B B... 






























Reference.. SB... 


Tu-udSiiei 














1 


1 


























































1N7 School 






Sorlftli,flt>M. 






























































Scbool 


Botb S B... 


TU. Knd Sne* 






















BJSSEiS:;?:;::::::: .::;:; sohooV.:::: 


Ee(e™.e..,Own.. 


Sub.andfliiei 




Oud 










































K«™l.ton,D.I ! 


1 












gss 












im 




O-n.. 


Tu.BDd Dnes 




























SSSSJ^'gla 































































::::::::::j:: 




gj,;„^S:l:::::::::li*- 






Oiii.. 


















































.^„.. .....„„._. 



S B flcbool bunding. 



do Ogle 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Puilic, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Cosri 



Vol- 

2* 


p^J» 

Bbelvei 
Dee., 


dor- 

.as. 


1 
1 


pended Ctr- 
books. 


Books 
"^Jer" Ubrartao. 

en«. ^ 


H...... 








I 








Viola Ho11o»ay. 




jj! 


















M 










; 




m 








No report to board! 
No report to board. 










30 
















m; 




i 


i 












23 















So E^rtW board! 
No report to board. 










1*7 












■ 1 









ft 




















No report to bwd. 
No report to board. 


s 


























! • 






30 


Teacher. 


1 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 






■-^■-- 




F^uiMcbiwii; 








No report to board. 


























*■ 










st 








No report to board. 
Sor.Si.rttobo.rd. 




30 
















Cruthla Qnnt. 








No report to boanl. 


















NorepJIrttohoani: 


ID 




* 












1 












AlltOD Ivei. 






















2 








No report to board. 










B, W. CJark. 








No report to hoard. 
No report to board. 
No report tn board. 


































78 








No report to board. 
No report to board. 






; 






::::::: 


2 
U 

30 






si iiemice Manley. 
M 1 Edith E. Phelps, 
















No report to b«rd. 
















1 


No report to board. 






































No report to board. 






1 


i 




3* 


e 


.... 


20 00 1 7S 




ZellaHeConnell. 








No report to board. 


























JW§'°'^' 




















LIBRABY COMMISSIONERS. 

I'ublic, School Olid Society Libraries in ilicbigan. — CosTistrEj). 



'^V^^i^^: 


i 

1 

■s 

It 


cu„. 


Reference 
or cirou- 

tatlns. 


Own 
ins- j 


g 


Catalogue. 


VanBurenCo-Con.,- 






, 


















































. 






1 






















acboDi 


Refetence.. 






























T 




Towntblp... 


CtrvDUtliig. 


























































Behool 


ci™.™. 


Own 1 Fi 






























































































































: 




















































8 


IgM 


Sclinol 


Circulating. 


















































i 






















































1 '... 
















18W 


Biiiooi 


Relerence.. 






















i ; 






























WUbtBIMwCo.: 




School 




, 


D. 














iSSiSSI-Dfl:: 







::::.:::i:::::::::: i... 




Ann Arbor, D.i 







































1 ! 1 L I .nnolp 



S II School buiLrHng. • Tnwnahl|i clerk'* office. 



" SECOND ANNUAL REPOBT. 149 

Pubtie, Sckool and Society Libraries in Uiehigan. — ComiNCED. 














' 
















1 


26 OU 






































































1 


29 




22,421 


i 



















































































report to iKmril. 



150 UBRABT COMMISSIONERS. 

Public. Bchool and Sodeti/ Librariet tii Uichigan. — Costistjed. 



County, citj-, dlstrlRt. 
Cownsblp ot nitage. 


i 

11 


Referance 
or olrcu- 
KUdK. 


Own 

bnild- 
Ing. 


— 




CiUlogoe, 


WMhWiunr Co.-Con..- i 1 
























































































































1 


1 


! 


KStB:!.': :;;:i::::;: 
























































































































































„ 1, 


















































































































































































1 
















|?|:;---:-::-- 








1 


































1 


i 








































I ,-.,-.,! 1, 



,Ueog-lc 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
Publu:, School attd Society Libraries in Mickigan. — Cantinuei: 



IMI. 1 ISOI- 


1 

Boolial 
added | 

dur- |: 

jear, , 


pe^-ed! Cir- 1 Boo.. 1 

du^ogeuUfon^ueed^Jor ^,^,„. 

toe , books. ence. 
booka. ; 1 

1 


ReinarkJ. 


M 




40 




1 1 ■ 


No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report Co board. 

No report to board. 
No report Co board. 

NoreporCCoboard. 

sSre^rt Aboard'. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 










34 














4W 

It 















22 




















le 




































IT 















































n 




























No report to board. 
No report Co board. 


























8 








No report to board. 


M 
























No report to board. 
No report to board . 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
























.... i r ■ 














16 
23 


















No report to board. 

No report Wboal^l! 
No report to board. 
No report to bnanl. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to boanl. 
NorepSrttoboard. 

No report to l>o»rd. 
No reiiort to board. 

So report to board! 

No report to board. 

NoI«pS"tob™r.i: 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to boarrl 
No report to b.*rd. 
No report tn board. 
No report CO board. 

No report to boanl! 

No report to board. 






i i 






























1 


! 












40 




























64 


,. .1 


' 














































30 


1 


















18 




















12 












1 








'S 
































































iS 






















c",-r i 
















"^^ cV'- 



152 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Publu), School and Society Libmriea tn Michigan. — CONTINOED. 







1 - ■ 
























1 


























! 


1 
































School 

Ladlai' llh'y 






Tu.uidanea D. 
TkuUon D. 




Yp»ll«iH.nlli 


n„. 




Card 








yStl«Dli.U.3 




; :■•■■ 




























YK.IiNoS.Si::;: 


Collie.... 


KeferonM., 




T«x.tion 


D. 


Card 




18T2 
























5E:Se:!*:: 


—■^-^, 




'iiwa'.'. 






























































T 






Tkx.udrecs 
Tuc.xnd Bnei 


1 






SlSffll: 

CIrcntntliig 

CirculatlQE. 

Circulating. 


Own.. 






1877 School 

i IBfiT School 










Own- 
Si!... 


SocUlB. fine.. 
Social., lino.. 






"■■] 




18« 


































■ 1B61 1 School 


Clroulfttlng, 


Own.. 














'iji' 
















Own.. 
Own.. 










Both 


Tuition .... 












































































;™iiilr^ 


CIrcuUtlng. 


Rent.: 


















Thx. and fln«. 






■ 






( .-,.-, ,-5 1. 


S B School building. 


DB 


ewey. 










'■ C*' 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 153 

Fublio, Bchool and Society Libraries in Michigan. — CosxrsVED. 



to report to bi 
io report lo In 
io report to tH 






1 report to board. 



.| H. P. Ervlag. 
. James K. Mind. 



I Wlllikm Artley'. 



Kl ■ 1 1 1 Inbelle Hanford. 

136 I .....I S* I 130 I T. J. Gunn. 

200 1 14 ,'....1 II es 100 [ j Freeoian HuBton. 



No report to board. 






. >'o reimrt In 



o feimrt to board. 



1' » ,!l".|::::':::;;.::::.:;::i:::::::;::ljA^™r_ 


I«S.m| S.mi MO |ii.WOt» ii-.eia JM.eao Henry M.Ctley. 



154 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Public, School and Sociefy Libraries in Michigan. — Cowtinueo, 



<ir,,vs;-;.ss:'' 


1 
1 

If 


CtaM. 


•J.g.T 


Own 


Bnpport. 




Cktaloene. 


■Vayae Co.— Con.: 














































1870 


FreepubUf. 






































1878 


School 


ClnmUtlng. 




Tw.»nclflnM 
















































Bent.. 




















V„rSy™«^- 






























IHSH 

lues 

183T 


School 

School 


ClrcahitlnR 

CirciiiatlDg 


W;: 






















Written 
















1H« 


Free public 


Both 


8 B... 
































School 


Uoth 


SB.., 


Suh.»dfln» 
















\m sch'wi 


























IJB ::;::: 

School 


ClrcuKUnK-l 

Clrontatlng. 










1897 
















H 


ISM 








Humn, Smitbvllle 






























s 






Tu. mud fine* 
'Aiktlun 






ssRiii'----- 




Own.. 
























Free public 
















1 . 




















IMi 




S::':'-; 


SEsasi 










%^:: 










Tui. and flnei 














lan 


sibiii 


ClrcaUtb^ 


SB... 


































1S71 
IMS 


School 

School 

Ijulles' llb'f 
Free public 

School 


Clrcnlmtlng 

Ci™uU.h.g 




Tui. ftncl Udcb 








OWD.. 




















i*i™outh,D.ifl:::;::; 




SB... 






ClrcuUtlng 


















ssHIhv--" 




School 


rirauUtlil^.'SB... 














V!SS%i :::.:. :::::: ::::;;::::::::.::::::.:;.:::.:::::;:: 






T'Vinai'p 



SECOND ANNUAL REPOET. 155 

Public, Eohoot and Bocietj/ Lihrariet in UioKigan. — Continued. 



Dec., 
IWl. 


"a" 


as 
S 


i 


Er- 

pended 

daring 

bo^ki. 


o.^^R„n 


Book, 
oied for 


Libnrlu. 


H...„.. 












No report to board. 
























No repSrt to board. 












1» 




Fred Daabei, 
















400 




TO 










No report to board. 






M36 


80 


SO Jabn nukty. 




10 










Norep^MMboaJd; 












110 ! 


2li 


BOO 






.Michael C. Beaapre. 


1.1S2 








No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 










1 
















36 1 Tnhnr.n^h 


340 

in 

SSB 

3M 

ISl 
62 






2 




160 




Fraak S. Oliardln. 






i 












10 ! 10 . (ieo. H.rper. ^ 







SB 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 




29B 


30 ! Margaret Huso. 




ai:::; 


200 






Wm. D. Altnrd. 


20 




.V.,.,o„„^„. 














J. A. Wilton. 




10 










No report to board. 






300 








6 




H1n.mU.Smmi. 

James E. Baker. 
Ceorge S. Clark. 










«! 


.:..,. 


00 











20 

39 
IM 






No report to board! 












.73 


"e 


2SM 
«O0 


40« 




Wm. 0. Hlnckter. 
Sapt.Me.d. 








No'^rtw board: 


















" 


10 Cbarte* Kaebler, 


WO 




! 




No report Co board. 


200 

s 

3W 

'■Z 
'S 

«0 
2, (WD 

62 
60 


::::::■: '::::: 







Wm. Kiilott. 
EllaAnderwn. 














12. 3|.... 


GOO 


307 








No report to board. 
No report to buard. 


3 




■■'Vm ::;;;::::; 




10 
















4 








IGT 




Emogene L. Wiillami 
C. E.' kjrder.' 

Ueorge Lee. 




> 



















ijj 


.. . 




2,000 , 100 
















^ 












b. b. Alien. 




io 










r.nnorr 

























lo6 LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

PubUo, School and Society lAbrariea tn Michigan. — COSTISPED. 



County, nity.dlitrlct, 
to-nihlp or village. 


1 

1* 


■ ; Own 

CtaM. 1 or drcu- . rent 
1 la ting. bnlld. 


Support. 


g 


Catalogue. 


^S-^Sfo^r^S!!: 








!!!!!!!!::!'!!! 

Feeiand nnea 






im 


^^■-^j^j- 






■■ ■■■■^.■.■- -iVi;;" 










1 






































.... 
















































Schonl 


Both 














iWx! aiid n'nea 






SSasftS-.'s::;;: 
B:|:aaS:'.::::::: 

sUSEwr. d! a.. !!!!!!!! 

Sumpter, D.*fl 

ISSEE^J'^?."::!! ■ 

Snmpter U.Bfl 

l*ylor.D.l 

Taylor, D. I. 

Taylor. D.Bfl 

■I^ylor,T 

V»n Buren, U. i 

V»nBuren,D.2 


la 

'ism' 

'i«6G' 

"ieai* 

!:::!' 


School 

School 

Scbool...... 

Scbool 

'a^i'hoii '.'.!!!! 


Both Ovm.. 

ClrcnUtinn.j Own.. 

ISS,»»,M»»::; 

arculnllDg 

'cireuiiiMnK. a'ii!!; 

'cTrb'uiiti'ng'. oJS.'.' 








Taxation. ... 
FiMi!!!!!!!!! 
Fi'Mi!!'.!!!!!! 

■ss:°H-!M: 

'i^tion!!!!. 

'Fl'nei!!!!!!!!' 
Taxation.... 

Ttaatlon 

Taxation .... 




ffr' 






'F«;'pibiio 

'8i'h™i'.'.!!!: 

Free public 

|a:.:::- 

Free public 


'c'lreuhiUne 


'Owii!! 








Reference. 




Van Buren, D.T 11 

Van Buren, 1). 8 fl 

W)-auilott«, city 

Wexford Co.: 


im 


Own., 

Own.. 

CircuUtlDg. Rent.. 


Printed.,'!!!!!!! 


Br."::::::::::; 












Cedar cfeeKi>.i 










Cedar Creek, -r 

Cherry Grove, D.l.,.. 
Cherry Grove, U. a — 
CherT7 Grovel D. 3..., 
Cherry Grove, D.4... . 

ClamLakelDia'a!!!!! 
















ClwuUlte, D, 6 




Ok^ 



S B Scbool building. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPOBT. 157 

Public, School and Boniety Libraries in Miehigan. — Comtinded. 



pblela 

on 
ehelvM 


dnr- 


1 


Ei- 
peDded 
djrt», 

bSEe. 


cuUUOD 

of 

booki. 


Book! 
QMdfor 
reter- 
ence. 


! 

Librarian. { Remkrka. 






j 




No report lo board. 
No report to board. 
















S 




t2tB 




Eagene Smitb. 




' 


* 


.... 


414 


m 


131 


W. L. Brace. 










111 




Un. B. Haothome. 












No report to board. 
No report to board. 






















too 


liw 


E. A. Hilling. 










No report to board. 
No report lo board. 
No leport to board. 
















;;;;;;;: 


'S 














30 W 






J, Loeffler. 






No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board! 












7i': ,? 




ST SO 


1^ 


«3 


Grant W. Oordon. 
Edwud J. Runn. 




171 














13 


MOO 
21KI0U 






TsTk... ■ 




600 
















» 










No report to board. 








m 




M. B. DawKin. 










No report to boanl. 








1 




O. <i. Furdf. 
John Fryor. 










» 












Xo report to board. 


« 








190 


Hm 


JabQ Crowley. 




1 


No report lo board. 








87 


iw 


K. E. Magoonaugh. 








No report to board. 








M 


60 


ThoinaiA. Bugar*. 








No report (o board. 










F. W. Bavage. 
M™.JmieiW.Coder. 




MO 








40 




! ::;:! SS 








f^Jp: 






1 ' 1 


11. «M 


10 








i 




No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report to board. 

No report to board. 
No report to board. 
No report to board. 

No report lo board. 
No report lo board. 


























80 














: 
















1 i 






















































No report to board. 




« 







LIBBABT COMMISSIONERS. 



J'ublic, Schuol and S<rci€l\/ Libra 



Cnnnty, cily, dlalrlct, 
towDiblp or village. 


1 

C1*H. 


Reference 
or circa- 
imiDB. 


Own 1 
tog.l 


5 


OttlaEue. 


"■c'SKSr""-.'. 









































































































































































































































D,„„.db, Google 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 159 

Public, School and Soviettf Libraries in Michigan. — CoNCLunEn. 



Vol. 

■fadVM 

D«o.. 




^. 1 

during ' cnbtloD 


Book! 
n«ed tot 

«nce. 


LlbnrUn. Remarks. 


3B3 


i i 




_ 


:::::::: 










... i.... 






: Jlo report (o board. 














i i..,. 








































































:::::::: 


































i 




















































1 PO 



D,„„.db, Google 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Summary.— /"uWie, School and Soeiely Libraries in Midiigati. 
t Total ^""' 



CraitFord 



Huron.. 



.Marqaette... 
Midland... ." 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 
SVXXARY.— Public, School and Sodety Libraries in Michigan.— Covclvsdkd. 



D,gnz.dbvC00gle 



„.db,Coogle 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



■- \ THiaD ANNUAL EEPORT 



STATE BOARD 

LIBEAEYCOMMISSIOMES 

MICHIGAN 

FOB THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 111. 190-2 



LANSING. MICH. 
KiaraT SMTTB PMNTINU CO-. ^STATE PRrafKss AND UlNDiaS 



,.db, Google 



THIED ANNUAL EEPOET 



STATE BOARD 



LIBEAEY COMMISSIOIEES 



MICHIGAN 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1902 



LANSING. MICH. • , > . 

P SUITB I^INTING CO.. STATE PRINTERS AKD BINDERS! lQ|t^ 
■SOS O 



iii'"! i;i .!; ;/// ''.:iV' 



( iw / ( ):i ;■ 1/ r-- 






/. / .>!li )l!/ 



.D,„„.dii, Google 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Lansing, Michigan, December 31, 1902, 
Hon. Aaron T. Bliss, 

Governor of Michigan. 
Sir — I have the honor to submit the third report of the State Board 
of Library Commissionera for the year ending December 31, 1902. 
Very respectfully, 

Pbtes White, 

President. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



ACTS AND RULES GOVERNING THE STATE BOARD OF 
LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



ACT Ko. 115, PUBLIC ACTS, 1899. 

AN ACT to create a State Board of Library Commiasionera, to promote 
the establishment and efflciency of free public librariea, and to provide 
an appropriation therefor. 

The People of the State of Michigun enact: 

Sbc. 1. The Governor, with the advice and conaeot of the Senate, 
shall appoint four perBonp, residents of this State, wlio, together with 
the State Librarian, who shall be a member ex-officio, shall couBtitnte 
a board of library commissioners. Two memt>ere of said board shall 
be appointed for a term of four years and two for a term of two years, 
and thereafter the term of office simll lie four years. All vacancies 
occurriug in the appointive membership of said board, whether by 
expiration of term of office or otherwise, shall be filled by the (lovernor, 
with the advice and consent of the Senate. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the library commission to give advice 
and counsel to all free libraries in the State, and to all communities 
which may propose to establish them, us to the best means of establish- 
ing and administering such libraries, the selection of books, cataloguing, 
and all other details of library management. In January of each year 
the board shdil make a report to the Governor of its doings, of which 
report one thousand copies shall he printed by the State printer for the 
use of the board. 

Sec. 3. It fhall be the duty of all free libraries orgauir.ed under the 
laws of the State, whether general or special, to make an annual report 
to the board of library ronimisBioners, which report shall conform as 
Hear as may be reasonable and convenient, as to time and form such rules 
as the board may prescribe. ., 

Ssc. 4. No member of the Hoard of Library Com misfi oners shall 
receive any com|>ensation for his services, except that the board may 
' appoint one of their numl>er to act as secretary, and such secretary may • 
receive such sum as shall be agreed ufmn by the hoard, not exceeding 
three hundred dollars annually, for clerical services. The board shall 
be entitled to expend u sum not to exceed five hundred dollars in any 
one year for supplies and incidentals and for the actual and necessary 
expenses of its members in the discharge of their duties. The accounts 
of .the board shall be audittti by the State Itoard of Auditors, and paid 
oat of the general fund. 



6 ACTS AND RULES GOVERNING STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Bec. 5. The Auditor General shall add to and incorporate with the 
State tax for the year eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and every year 
thereafter, the sura of eight hundred dollars, to be asseBsed, leried and 
collected as other State taxes are aSBessed, levied and collected, which 
sum when collected shall be placed to the credit of the general fond to 
reimburse it for the buuih authorized to be expended under this act. 

This act is ordered to take immediate effect. 

Approved June 1, 1899. 

' ' Bm.ES AlM>PTt:P BY BOARD '6i"'l^iBSAKr' JCOMitl^liJNBbiaf / '-':).' 

Free public libraries, township anil public school libraries in the State 
of Michigan may become registered with the State Board of Library 
Commissioners by complying with the following rules, formulated by the 
Board : 

(1) All registered librarieB musf 1)6' free to the public. 

(2) The libraries must have ft suitable custodian and be placed in a 
room properly provided with book sbelvAs' and tables, itnuet b^ o^u'tb 
tbe public at least part of two days in the week; . rr, . ,]:;, ..-., ,,| 

(3) A township library applying for registration most «gT<eett<>'use 
the fines as provided in Article 13, Section 12, Constitution of Michigan 
exclusively for library purpose. 

The above named section reads ^ follows: ., . 

Sec. 12. The. legislature shall also provide for the establi^liLni^'lli't 9^ ftt 
least one public library in each township and city.' and all i^nea asses^d 
and collected in the several counties and townships for any breadi'bf'th^ 
penal laws shall be exclusively applied to, the use of such libraries',' .bnless 
otherwise ordered by the township board of any township, or the board of 
education of any city: Provided, That in no case shall such fines 1>4 ii'se3 
for other than library or school purjtQses. , ' . , '"". ,■'' 

(4) A yearly report must be made to (he Stiite Board',o',r.ibrary 
Commissioners by the officers of the registered Ubrarie-S. Blanks for the 
report will be furnished by the Board, , . i ,,., 

The rules having been accepted, a certificate of registration .will ite 
issued by the Board .to the applying library, which, by the . transaction, 
will receive the following advantages: /,,.,■ 

(1) Begistered libraries shalHw entitled to receive (rqm the Board o^ 
Library Commissioners advice and aid regarding the purchase, classifying 
and cataloguing of books, and information on all subjects, relating , to 
the care and management of libraries, ■ j-. 

(2) Catalogues of the Michigan State Library shall be placed in a^I 
registered libraries, and a book or books may be borrowe.d troin the Stat^ 
Library for a limited time by patrons of the registered library, j These' 
loans will b& made on request of the local libi;arian and transportation 
expenses must be paid by the borrower. 

/(3) Registered libraries may procure copies of State documents upon 
• request made to the secretary of tlie Board of Library Commissioners. 
(4) Free public libraries incorporated under Act 164 of .the Pubjic 
Acts of 1877, and organixed aftpr the establishment of the Board of 
Library Commissioners, upon notification to the Board .that they have 
an established library of at least one hundred volumes otber (ban St^te 
or government docuinents, and upon furnishing a Ijst of said books tf[Q 



ACTS AND RULES GOVERNING STATE LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS, ^ 

the Board may receive fcom the State a loaa of oue hundred TOlnmes to 
be selected from the lists furnished by the Board. Said books to be re- 
turned within six months unless an extension of time Ib granted by the 
Board. 



ACT NO. 199, PUBLIC ACTS, 1901. 

AN ACT to require County Commissioners of Schools to transmit lists of 
Public Libraries and the Librarians thereof. 

The People of the State of Michigan enact: 

SecTioN 1. Hereafter It shall be the duty of the county commissioner 
of schools, in each county of this State, in the month of June in each year, 
to transmit to the Secretary of the State Board of Library Commission- 
ers, at Lansing, a complete list of all libraries other than personal 
libraries within his county, whether township, school district, village or 
city, together with the names and postofSce addresses of the librarians 
thereof. 

This act is ordered to take immediate effect. 

Approved June 3, 1901. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT. 



Four meetings of the Board of Library ComiuiBsioDerH were beld during 
the past year. 

July 6, 1902. 
September 7, 1902. 
Octolfter 7, 1902. 
March 7, 1902. 

At the meeting of July 6th, Mr. Peter White was elected preBident, and 
Mrs. M. C. Spencer, secretary. 
The following publications have been issued by the Board : 

Second annual report, 1901. 

Legislative history of towaehlp libraries, In Michigan 183S-1901, 'compiled by 
Lewis H. Miller. 

One thousand copies of the latter document were ordered printed for 
distribution, it being clearly shown by this history that the decline of 
the library system of Michigan is owing to the diversion of funds which 
the builders of th« constitution fully intended should be used for library 
purposes. 

REGISTRATION OP LIBRARIES. 

The follOTTing libraries have registered with the Board since the last 
report: 

Alden, Custer Township, District No. 6. 

Bath Township Library. 

East Tawas, Free Public Library. 

LiTOnla Township. 

Munlsing Township Public Library. 

Hancock Free Public Library. 

Harbor Springs T. M. C. A. Library. 

Hersey Public School Library. , 

Total number of registered libraries — IS. 

The following libraries have borrowed 100 books under the registra- 
tion plan : 

Armada. 

Bath. 

East Tawas. ' 

Hancock. 

Harbor Springs. C^,-.,-.,-,!,, 

Martin Township. Dig: izsd by V^iOOQIC 

Sterling. ^' 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
SUUUakg of books loantd to regi^ered librariu. 



Name of library. 


No. 


Circu- 
lation. 


Number 
readers. 




4c 
40a 

3a 
6 

13 
17 

.33 ' 

7f 
56ff 

2- 
42a 

lib 

39 

27 

41 

18ft 

42f 

lb 
52d 


278 
239 

107 
74 

m 

126 
-., 12a 

38 

,1M 

" 80 

29 

138 
207 
- 202 
320 
219 
177 

.176 
.196 








New Boston Free Public .,, ,. . ., 

Sterling Free P^iblic 


29 
15 






C«rterTow«hip.(Aldan)..., .-..y...- '.. .1,... 


: 30 




33 








. 14 


























Harbor Springs Y. M. C. A ^ 











' While the registration of libraries has been of eloWergrowth than Was 
anticipated' by the Board, it is doubtless fine to tlie diflBcnltyof getting 
the information regarding the eyst^ ihto the hands of the teachers and 
educators, the very localities which are most in need of help beii^' the 
most difBcult to reach. 

, That the attention of the pnblic may be called to fhe aid whidi the 
State is prepared to give to localities organizing free public libraries, the 
law establishing the Board of Library CommisBioners and the roles 
adopted by that body have been embodied in this report, (See pagefi.) 

Attention is invited to the communications from commissioners of 
schools r^ardiug library ' conditions in their respective counties. Also 
to articles by Mr. W. A. French, Deputy Bnperintendent of Public In- 
struction; and Mr. B. T>. Bailey, Commissioner of Bchools of Otse^ 
county. Both of these gentlemen have had a wide experience in ednca- 
* tional Work and their recommendations are entitled to attentive con- 
sideration. . 

LIBItART EXTENSION. 

For the purpose of stimulating the growing interest in library exten- 
sion, the secretary of the Commission visited the following places : Caro, 
October 8, 1902, by invitation of the "Wixson Club; Ionia, November 8, 
1902, by invitation of the Woman's Club. Great enthnsiasm was maniJHt 
at both of these meetings and the establishment of free pnblic libraries 
in the near future is assured. The success of the movement will be^tiie^ 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 11 

direct result of vigoi'oiis iiction on the part of the club women. Detailed 



I.Albioni.ui mIi Mi'i '111! •<! '<,Mii-i-'ui|iMnnoad.-' ' 
I , JsIwetDlng;^ 



*m>'":^r-i ,„ ■.ip.,.i-..,i.u n.jBiweroinf 

BentoD Harbor, , , Jackson,, 

Caro. ' ■""'■■' ■■'•' ■■• ■■" '* " ■ lialSmazo 

Charlotte. Lanalng. 

Dowaglac. -i i. ' .iManlatee; 

BacanabB. Mt. Clemens. 

.iPllnl. -,li:. M I,. ,r.,-„\< .Im'.II. " - .NlirtJ r...ll ■ 
., J^FAHuromt i 






i. , St.; Joseph, 



'■MO*tllT '"Ml"' '"'^'i ' ■■'" '" "^'gSull Ste.'Warie.''"" '', '■ " "'\ 

'Hudson. ''■■Ii "I ••■■I': H' " 'm'-!I' '■ I'TteutUiefa:'' """'" '■" ' ■i^i'ii.i 

Ionia. ■•ii:i-:"™i«ee'RlveiB,i'l I"",.! ■.,:, 

.>,fW(^.M'tH''Wn-., 1,- ..:.!■,: ,..,!•,, II TpaWfltCltj-.ini. I- ■ -i ■..■,,..;! -.r 

In ^ fioweii a'rfne' piero of tui^iicrtj-,' jncatpd , in' 'tliit^ ji^rt ,of, '{l^e^ ci,t.y Ua,8 
been giyeu' bjjl' the McPhei-fiop |W,('tl(^f"S^, thg .libr^'y fj>,,|>ft,piace4 ip ,the 
center of'tlie aqu^re.'^''^^ y/, ')^ -..ni.,!' -V,."!! ■ i u .• '.r.-,,. ..■ ■■ ■;. .-.■■ 

iW, printed conimiinic'atfoiifjrnni. a .citizen of C|iro, aB,3 |^.»<taten(ieQt 
ybpied,,l|iwn ap''tpnia'pp»:'s|in'[)er, ejKiJaiii' iu.dptail the,p|tiiatiipn in fhe 
above','menijpiie3|Cifif»'. ' ||.^,, ' . ',,'|, .,,.' \ ■. ,, .! ^, 

has been cli^cuBsed more or letis l^or a Tfiir or two. but it did not aBsuijoe 
ion until the Wilson C|ub,of Oi^rp invite^^the Secretary 
[^Jljrarj f!;ommi^sioafvt>|to visit tlip city, and ^iddresB a 
n the subject,] whijCh she di^^ m^ October last^ , Her 
jpnjforination and.a^pnimittee'of' seven gerit^Iemen was 
: meeting to, prosecute tlie good worli. A vote for the 
t'be support of the libi'ary will be taken at, tb? r^ular 
township ^meeting to be held ApriJ 6, 190?. It is now generatl^ expected 
ttta't a Carnegie'Tibrary bmidihg will W erected in Tai-o during the com- 
ing •^^ri 'Af^dyVne'eli^ible site'for 'iMia^ 1^^ by, one of 
Carb'^'geiei^piis citizen's.**' ' •''■■•' ■■■ ,.' f .■ . . {^i,)no\c 



^<S*^ffi 



fElitEy. 



12 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

"Mrs, Marion Hall Fowler, daughter of the late Frederick Hall of 
Ionia, has generon^ly given to her native citv the Hall property, a flne 
sandstone residence and large trat-t of land on the main street of the 
city, for a free public library. The library is to be known as the 
Hall-Fowler Memorial Library. 

"The city of Ionia will prepai-e for the support of this library by the 
spreading of a tax. In order to provide for this tax, an act amending the 
incorporation laws of the city is necessary and a bill to this effect will 
be-introduced into the I^egislature. Acting under this, the mayor of the 
city will appoint a board consisting of six members wiio will have charge 
of the library. They will be appointed 'without regard to political 
affiliation and wholly with reference to their fitness to hold office, at least 
three to be women.' Another wise provision will be to extend the 
library privileges to localities adjacent to the city of Ionia, the extent 
of such privileges to be determined by the board. The amount of money 
which will be raised by this proposed tax will be about J2,500, which is 
considered a sufficient sum to properly conduct the library. The Ladies' 
Library Association of Ionia generously voted to turn over to the city 
their flne library of about 1,0(H) carefully selected volumes. As a result 
of the strenuous efforts of the ladies of Ionia and the-^nerous response 
of all the citizens, that city will soon enjoy one of the finest libraries in 
the State. Mrs. Fowler's act in presenting to the city the homestead 
is most generous and wise, as it will peri>ettiate the name of her family 
and be of incalculable benefit to the citizens of her native home.'' 

GIKTS AND nEQL'RS'^. 

By the death of the Hon. Charles Willard, the city of Battle Creek 
received the gift of |4ft,flO(l.(KI, the Inquest being for the purpose of erect- 
ing a public school libi-ary, to be called the Charles Willard Memorial 
Library. This generous action of Mr. Willard will give to that city one 
of the handsomest libraries in the State, 

Mr. George F. Sonner of IJenton Harbor has promised a gift of ^(1,000 
the gift being supplementary to the f20,0(M).(M) given by Mr. Carnegie 
for the purpose of ei'e<;ting a library building. Mr. Sonner's present 
generosity and plans for the fntui-e will place Benton Harbor in an 
enviable position so far as library matters are concerned. 

In Big Rapids the Phelps Free Public Library will soon be open to the 
public. This library will be located in the Phelps' residence and will 
be supported by the city. Mr. F. R. Wells of Paris. France, has 
announced his intention of iii-epeuting |600 worth of books to this 
library. 

In Marshall the Ladiee' Library Association has proposed to turn 
over to the city its library of 4.ft0fl volumes with fOOO.OO in cash, pro- 
vided a reading room and library shall be established and supported by 
the city. They plan also, if possible, to unite with the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union in the purchapc of a building to be used by both 
organizations. 

Through the generosity of Messrs. J. L. Longyear, Peter tt'hite and 
S. R. Kaufman, the city of Mai-quette will soon rejoice in a new library' 
at the cost of J-KI.OOO.OO. The contemplated building will have a capacity 
of 17.000 books with a i)roviBion for an extension if necessacv.^ , , ^. ^ 

In Lexington, Jlrs, Sleej)er, wife of Hon. Albert E. Sleei>er, witfr her 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 13 

eiBters, Mrs. Hanley of Bad Axe nnd Mrs. Meyers of Cleveland, have 
given a library building and library to that village. The building is 
valned at |5,0(IO,00 and the library comprises 2,000 volumes. This 
library is in memory of Mr. Charles H. Moore, father of the donors. 

Mrs. Fannie M. Blair of Vickstnirg has presented to the Ladies' 
Library Association of that village a beautiful and commodious library 
building to be named tlie Fannie M. Blair Library. 

Thus in Michigan, as in many utlier states, generous hearted men and 
women are building for themselves monuments far more enduring than 
"storied urn or animated bust." 



REPORTS OF COUNTV COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 

.M.OBR COUNTY. 

There is only one public lil>rary in the county, the Munising township 
library. Six schools have small school libraries and thirteen have none. 
Three traveling libraries have been establiphed with prospects for one 
or two more. Only two schools in .the county require more than one 
teacher, and such conditions preclude the establishment of more than one 
additional township library at present. Some steps in that direction 
have already l>een taken. January, in my opinion, would be a convenient 
time for all commissioners to make reports on libraries. 

Flora McIjAchlan. 

ALLEGAN COCSTi'. 

I submit the following information relative to libraries in Allegan 
county : ' 

Total number of libraries In county 160 

Total number of Bchoola faavtng libraries 150 

Total number of schools having no library 34 

Total number Free Public Libraries In towns and cities In county 10 

I would recommend that the .county coniuiiseioner of schools i-epoi-t 
data on public libraries at same time as school oflSrers' annual reports are 
forwarded to State Superintendent's office, which data wonld ajtply to 
conditions of previous school year. 

The library money is largely used for school purposes. 

Our teachers are generally interested in building up good working 
school libraries and some new books are added to nearly all of our school 
libraries each year. 

On the library question in genenil, it is my opinion that much nioi-e 
benefit would be derived by the reading public if all libraries were 
established in schools, whei'e not only pupils but patrons could have 
access to the books. The township library is almost entirely made up of 
a poor selection of books, and is taken advantage of only by the jwople 
who may live in the village where it is located; tlie people of the town- 
ship in general getting no benefit from it. Moreover, its support deprives 
the schools of funds that would be of great help to them iVlwiliJing up 
well selected district libraries. 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 




'1 ilLVHNAi COUhTVj 

In relation to the library conditions in tliie'colirity, they are not very 
encouraging. About ooe-fonrth Qf the schools under my supervisioD 
have small librariea, but such poor judgment was exercised in the selec- 
tion of some of them that they are of little use. I only know of one 
instance of a school board purchasing a library with school funds and 
I W4s<diirt(:tw i9< that. jdj^rhct la^-^^. . Fu9«]8,bQV9 been eecqr^ .tlii^pgli 
the teachers' efforts, usually by a box social, entertainment or a dance. 
In all such cases the choice o( the jso^Hs is l^ft to the teacher aod the 
result has sometimes been appalling. This condition of things I am 
tryJng.to ijuprove with an optiisistic bopciiofisuc^ss.. About a^ dozen 
of the, schoolsi ibtwe. Jlbrane9,i.8uchi,a« ithey are.i and. ithe- other ifoirty 
achooJs hgv«;nODe. iiFJve of the seven .towDebipBibAMeilibnairiefl^flujehras 
tkey, ane, but .thefleane oi»ly.fairli>- igood....i]B thfl cit^i of Alpena there 
iea good (>ublic libirary sunder ttue immediate. .mnnageiaeat lanid coJitroi 
«if the: ipubliiQ scbooli authorities. i,I may ad<t ithutiiD,iHDoierin9tanoesi4he 
money. itJiatsbDiild' Jiavfi, been.. us«diifor, libraries iwob. diverted ito.generail 
school purposes. Tbw. has happened iuiBoute ol.Ahe towuBhipo. i'£ shall 
have this ilibrary itiatter called up and thoroughly discussed at our 
coming institute. 

... 1 1 Jambs Case. 



.^^'I'Ki'iV'tby.'yfK" 



Number of libraries In Antrim county ^ ,,.,.,,. ..^^..^.^ ,.,,.,.,,. ,,,,. 37 

Number of school B having libraries ,,,,., ,.i/.',,,., ,|. .. .^^f.. ..].,,,',., ,,'.,. ,^J!6 

Numlier ot schools having no llbrarteB. ..,.^,,i,',.,,, ..,,',.^f . ,.\,|.'. . ,'^. ,.,.',,,,,.. S 

Numl>er of free puf^lig Ifl^rarii^. ..,....'.._,,. .,.,'.,;.. !,.,^.|. ,_,„fi',',. .,,,., ,',,|^„,.,., '.\}f 

i.i^Ve havoibeen innhiug some spwiai effoitts itolaronsftian>iBtelt«et in ithe 
subjeotbuitiwiithionly mndflnLtesucceesji The money ifotrilJbThraesJs need 
forrlibrarie8,.iD' thB willageft. but.iin cottUtir.V'distiiir^ iti i8.gendralll(v. used 
for school purposes. i>. ./ ! ■.i<\ !■. ■. :| 

■'''■■■" ■■■;■■ ■!'■ ■■■'■! i""> 'tfAiiAii.it^ot'WTV:'''' "■■■■ •■■!■. .■» 

This county has flue township libraries, one in eacJi. township.' ; Jbils 
vepy seldom that. , the I ijiimey setrflfid*' for themipport ofr.these.iibvaijies 
Is turnediiatOitlie.genernlim-^o«),l,fund. Therti an-e «ighte«ti sobools in .tbia 
cauDt.Vt:£ourteenjOf wlLidiiht^v.^ librnri«H' and. four small disttict schools 
are.as yet.. without.. AU.Ulic towDHbip libsrariemaireifi-ee.;. , ,[ ..n , . , , 

...■.' [ i. ,.l ... .■■. :i. ..i. ■■ I. : .1 i... ' U..J...lM1CKANKJ^. ., 

' ■■■' " '" " ' '''■'iiaIiry roL'Nf'i-.' ' ■' '' "'' '"■'■■'' '■■■■' ""■;_ 

. .My pw))..e)[pm'J«Dii-e ju,iualiine oot tlm .ro]ioi-tH irouicequixe oonoerning 
libraries, leads me to say that the grejitest difflctilty.i8,^iH,flnding!OUt: 
what is wanted. T desire to cooperate in every possible way toward 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 16 

the up-buHiJing of libraries but fail to nee liow the information I send can 
be helpful to" the Commiscion or to the general cause. From converga- 
fioDS with other commisaioners I believe that this feeling is quite general 
and I would suggest that you prepare a Btatement as to the intents and 
purposes of tie CoAimisslon and presenf it to the co m m i as i oners' section 
of the State Teaohere' Association which meets at Saginaw next week. 
I believe that such a course would be profitable because it would serve the 
doublepiirpose of enlightening the commissioners and popularizing the 
work of your commission. 

John C. Ketcham. 

n\Y COUNTY. 

There are forty schools in this county having school libraries, ranging 
in number of volumes fW>m twenty to three hundred, some of which are 
estabKsbed by law and others are the reHUlts of the efforts of teachers and 
pupils, in the way of socials and entertainments. There are twenty-nine 
schools (district schools) having no libraries. 

There is a movement on the part of the school authorities in (^ery 
township to use the library money for the purchase of books. A few 
townships had neglected this, but last year all complied with the law in 
this respect, deeming it of more interest to nse the library money for that 
purpose than for general school purposes. 

We hav6 only four or five commnnities in this county where tbe 
traveling library could be successfully worked. ' This library was in 
operation in the village of Pineonning last year and if I i-emeraber cor- 
rectly at Anburn also. The present law might be made to work \^onders 
in this direction if the educational sentiment in the various counties 
was such that it would compel them to do what is for the interest of the 
country schools; like the enforcement of all other laws, public conscience 
is at the bottom of all of it. 

C. W. Hm-HcocK. 

BENZIB COLNTY. 

We have in this county about thirty-?evcn or thirty-eight libraries. 
Twenty-two of theee are school libraries, while there are thirty schools 
without having established district librariec. There are ten townships 
which have libraries ranging from thirty to five hundred volumes. There 
are six or seven Sunday School libraries. The township libntries are the 
only public libraries which we find in our towns. 

Tlwe is no particular activity among our educators regarding library 
exten&loo,, the library money Ik not used for general school purposes in 
any of our townships. 1 am not entirely satisfied with the outlook, and 
hope yoji will furnish me with the particulars of the scheme -of furnishing 
the one hundred volumes. 

M. S. (iREGOBV. 
RB.VNC1I IWLNTY. 

Whole' number bt libraries in county fi* 

Number of schools having libraries S9 

Number of schools without librarlea (other than a few scattering, boohs) t7 

Number of township libraries 4 

Coldwftter city librarr 1 



16 REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBEABY COMMISSIONERS. 

As a rule teaebere are interested in eatablishiiig libraries and nearly 
all that has been done is a result of the teachers' efforts. In a majority 
. of cases the district boards vote the library money into the general school 
fund and by fo doing have done much to injure the spirit, of the teachers. 
I am sure that the people art coming to look upon libraries in a better 
light. The movement received a blow when some years ago boards and 
teachers selected works that were too heavy for the average reader and 
far too heavy for the pupils. Our recently established libraries have 
added books suited to the various grades of our rural schools. The 
result has been that not only do all the pnpils read the l>ooks but the 
patroqs are quite as interested as the children. 

M. W. WiMEB. 
CALHOUN COIJNTV. 

There are in Calhoun county 164 school districts. The three city 
districts, Battle Creek, Albion and Marshall each have excellent general 
and reference libraries. The six village districts each have fair reference 
libraries and everyone has begun the establishment of a good general 
library. There are libraries in 97 of the 155 niral districts. This number 
will be increased to 110 by the establishments being made this year. 
Library progress in the rural districts is largely the result of enthusiastic 
work by the teachers and pupils. The average size of the rural school 
libraries is 50 volumes. The six village school libraries average 252 vol- 
umes. Albion and Marshall city districts have more than 2,000 volumes 
each, and Battle Creek city has about 17,000 volumes. There are three 
township libraries and three other local public libraries in the county. 

Ernest Bl'rnham. 

cass coi'nty. 

School libraries GO 

Schools' without librarlee 54 

Ladles' libraries 6 

Libraries In the county 66 

There is some interest in library work in some parts of the county, 
but in nearly all the townships the money is used for school purposes. 

Please send me particulars as to the plan for free public libraries or 
the loan of 100 books. 

Wm. H. C. Hale. 

CHARI.EVOrX corxTY. 

There is more or less activity along the lines of establishing libraries 
in our county. We have worked for it. advocated it and hoped to see a 
good library in each school district in the wunty by this time. We 
think we have the leaven at work. Here and there a district takes hold 
of the matter and organizes a library so Ihat the number increases 
slowly. In some townships the library money is diverted to general 
school purposes. We have decided that where no township library is 
established the school district libraries are entitled to the fund. Some 
town boards think the district would he. entitled to its pro rata share, 
but we think the district or districts maintaining a libracv W?}!]! 
entitled to the whole amount. ^-■<- '=-■ => ^' 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 



Number of llbrarfea in county ^ 33 

Number of schools having libraries 15 

Number of schools with no libraries 49 

Number of tree public libraries ^ 7 



A. W. Chew. 



CHEBOYGAN COUNTY. 



I would respectfully report that there are in this county thirty-three 
librariea with a total of 6,645 volumes, viz.: 

I (city) Cheboygan library 4,000 vols. 

4 townahfp libraries 598 vols. 

18 district librariea 1,754 vols. 

10 school libraries 293 vols. 

Of the district libraries fourteen are {cept at the schoolhousea in charge 
of the teacher. Most of them were started by the schools by lueaDS of 
socials, entertainments, or sale of "certificates," and have been "adopted" 
by vote of the district. Twenty-four schools have librariea. Thirty- 
nine schools have no libraries. The Cheboygan city library is free to 
. the public. The villages of Mackinaw, Wolverine and Indian Kiver 
each have district libraries kept at the schoolhouses and circulated very 
Httle outside of the schools. 

Five of our sixteen townships use all their library money for general 
school purposes; seven use all for libraries (township or district), and 
in the other four, some districts use for library and some for general 
school. 

Our teachers are not as active as one could wish. Some are always 
alive — start libraries wherever 'tbey teach, but too many are inactive ; 
further, we have a very large number of young teachers each year and 
tbey do little. As a general thing the people are much interested in 
libraries, and especially in good reading for their children. If our 
teachers will take an interest and become leaders, we can hope to see 
a library in at least fifty of our sixty-four schools before many years; in 
fact it should be done this year. 

E. W. Baker. 

CLINTON COUNTY, 

I cannot give the number of libraries in the county ; I think it is safe to 
say that at least ninety per cent of our districts have libraries of greater 
or less degree, either circulating or reference. In some instances the 
money for library purposes is used in the general fund, but that is an 
exception rather than the rule. In general there is a very good spirit 
among our teachers toward the building up and adding to librariea. 

Theo. H. Townsend. 

crawford county. 

The library outlook in this county is not very encouraging. There are 
three public librariea. Some of these are subdivided and kept at two 
or more places in the township as the towns are so large that it would 
not be convenient if all were kept in one place. The public libraries are 
in Grayling (two places), Frederic and Beaver Creek (two places). 



J8 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

There are seven school districts having libraries and eighteen having none. 
Most of the districts have from two to iive resident families and very 
small schools. The districts are usually far apart. 

Flora M, Marvin. 

dickinson county. 

The library conditions in the county are encouraging. 
Teachers are fairly enthusiastic over the work and use their best efforts 
to build up their school libraries. 

Number ot libraries in county, eiclUHive of schools 2 

Number ot bcIiooIb having libraries, Including township libraries 24 

Schools without at least the beginning of a library 

Number of free public libraries in cities and towns In county 1 

The library money is not diverted to general school purposes, 

E. L. Pabmentbb. 

BATON COUNTY. 

Eaton county has 109 school libraries; 39 schools have none. 

Olivet college, Charlotte City and Baton Rapids City have libraries. - 

This does not include township libraries, and I do not know just how 
many of these there are in the county, and have no way of knowing. 

The majority of onr teachers are very much interested in seeing good 
libraries in our schools and are doing atrthey can to awaken interest in 
the rural districts. 

If in this work another term, I have decided t« make a strong effort to 
establish a library in every school district and place all on a better 
footing than ever before, by intelligent effort among teachers, school 
boards and patrons of owr schools. 

In some cases the library money is diverted from its purpose. I wish 
a law might be passed to prohibit this altogether. 

J. I-, Wagner. 

GENESEE COUNTY. 

In regard to library matters in the county of Genesee, I beg leave to 
report as follows; 

Number of townships In county 18 

Number of township libraries in county I 

Number of volumes In said township library 8S3 

Number of primary school districts in county 168 

Number ot district libraries in county -. 106 

Number of union school districts In county 2 

City of Flint (number of volumes not reported). 

Village of Fenton— Number of volumes 1.212 

Of the foregoing the city of Flint has the finest and largest library 
and in addition to this supitlies all school children with free text books. 
In the primary districts containing legally graded schools, fair libraries 
are to be found, ctfbtaining from two to four hundred volumes, and 
many of tbe niral districts now have libraries that are very ci-editahle and 
are cared for carefully, many fine book cases being furnished for their 
preservation. In the great majority of the districts it is probable that 



REPORTS OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 19 

some time in tlie past a vote was taken to organize a library and booliB 
were purchased, wliicli today would not command the attentioa of the 
reading public and many of whicli would be nselens in a working school 
library. But during the past six years, through the earnest efiEorts of 
many of my teachers aud the valuable assistance of school officers, we 
have placed book cases containing good books of reference, history, travel, 
biography, literature and elementary science in many of the sehoolhouses 
of the county.- 

These libraries are, with few exceptions in charge of the teacher dur- 
ing school terms and in charge of the director during vacations, and 
therefore a list of the librarians of the district libraries would simply 
be a list of the directors. In many cases the funds for purchasing books 
have been raised by teachers and pupils giving entertainments with an 
admission fee, a practice for which there are. argujnents both for and 
against. I must conclude by expressing the opinion that the highest 
efficiency of the school libraries can \tc attained only by making it com- 
pulsory on the authorities to expend library mOney for the maintenance 
of libraries and for nothing else, and to place the purchasing power, or 
at least the selection of the books in the hands of the Library Commis- 
sion, Department of Public Instniotion, or the county commissioner of 
schools. 

John IT. Tyi.eh. 

GOGEBIC COUSTY. 

Replying to your letter of December 17th, the pi'eaent date of making 
report to the Library Bureau is satisfactory to ine. Library conditions 
in the smaller towus in this county are not encouraging. There are two 
free libraries, the Carnegie Public Library in Ironwood and the City 
Library in Bessemer. The school in each of these two cities have 
libraries. There are snmll school libraries in the villajje of Marenisco 
and the village of Watersmeet, The viiiago of Wakefield and Wake- 
field township with ten schools and five or six hundred children have no 
libraries. I should be glad to have further information in regard to the 
plan fur organizing free public libraries. 

L. L. WaiGHT. 

HIt.T.SOALK COUXTY. 

There seems to be a growing sentiment in favor of libraries aud of 
library impro\'ement. 

The teachers of this county are, many of them, alive to the importance 
of good libraries. I sincerely wish that public sentiment in general were 
as much alive in this matter as is the sentiment among the teachers. 
However, this can hardly be expected at present. 

We have libraries in this county as follows: 

Public school libraries 132 

College library t 

Ladles' Library 1 

Total number of libraries 134 

Public schools without libraries 31 

In the districts having libraries, it frequently happens that none of 
the library, money, or only a small part of it, is used for library purposes. 



20 REPORT lOF BOARD OF LIBRARY C0MMISSI0NBB8. 

being diverted to geaei-at Hchoul pur^xtses. In my jadgment the law 
which permits the library money to be diverted to general school pur- 
poses is wrong. The money should be used for library purposes or 
forfeited by the district. By following this plan every district would in 
a few years, have the foundation of good library. In some districts 
money is appropriated in addition to that received from the State, bat , 
this is the exception, not the rule. 

I have jour letter of December 26th in reply to mine of the 23d. I 
wish to say that I will co-operate with you in every possible way to 
secure the passage of some law which will do away with the present 
system or lack of system rather, in the purchase and maintenance of 
school libraries. 

J have no doubt tliat many if not all of the county commissioners 
of schools are alive to the disadvantages of the present system and that 
they will gladly co-operate in securing a change in the present law. Your 
suggestion of preparing a bill and sending it to them with the request 
that tbey work for its passage, I believe, is a good one. Whenever I can 
be of service to you, command me. 

A grave defect in the present system is the placing of library money 
iu the hands of the school boards. Many boards are either indifferent to 
such mattei's or incompetent to exercise discriminating judgment in the 
purchase of books. Other boards are composed of business or pcofes- 
Kional men and are too busy to give the time and thought required for 
the making of good selections. 

If suggestions are in order in this report, (and if they are not they 
may be disregarded and stricken out) 1 would suggest that the county 
commissioner of schools be authorized "by law to appoint a county board 
of library commissioners from among the teachers of his county; that 
he be ex-officio a member and have authority to appoint five assistants. 
This county board, with the advice and assistance of the State Board 
of Library Commissioners and the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction should purchase the books for each district. It should also 
have authority to have books rebound when nei^essary, and to provide 
shetf room for the books, the cost of shelves or cases to be added to the 
district tax, not to be paid out of the library moneys. In case the amount 
of money were too small it might be allowed to accumulate until such 
time as it could be ex[>eaded to the best advantage. The commissioner 
of schools should collect and keep in his office, a permanent record of the 
libracies in his county, except such as are in incorporated cities, and 
under a city superintendent. In city schools there should be a city board 
in which the city superintendent should perform the same duties as the 
county commissioner does in the county board. 

By following some such plan as outlined it would be possible, it seems 
to me, to select books adapted to the several grades of pupils, and also 
to make systematic additions at regular Intervals. Th^ libraries could 
thus be made a gi'eat educative force, and an invaluable assistance to 
school work. 

CilAULES P. HULCK. 

nritoN roiNTY. 
I am unable to give the number of libraries in this county. The town- 
ship libraries are not reported to me. 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 21 

The number of schools in the county hiiviog libraries is eighty-two 
The number of liooks in these libraries varies from a few volumes to 
four hundred. The number having no libraries as jet, is eighty-two. In 
the great majority of schools, the books were placed there by teachers 
from the proceeds from entertainments. The teacher as a rule acts as 
librarian. In some instances the books are lost, no one keeping trace 
of them. There are some schools in which a vote of the district estab- 
lished a library but it is difiBcult to ascertain these districts, as Uie 
teacher does not know about the matter nor do the present school 
officers. If your Board desires to have the names of the districts having 
libraries established or not established by the districtf, let me know and 
I shall send you a list. I do not exactly understand wliat the Board 
wants in this matter. I cannot say that there is much activity in library 
matters at present in this county. The patrons of the schools as a rule 
are indifferent. Our teachers, however, do much to encourage public 
sentiment in favor of the library, I agitate the question wherever I go 
in my visits. The money coming from fines, etc., is iu most cases diverted 
to general school pnrposes. In my opinion the law ought to be so 
amended that this cannot be done. 

D. Kaercher. 

INGHAM COINTY. 

rommissioners required to report to secretary of Library rommissioo 
on or before June 30. Satisfactory. By that date the commissioner has 
certainly visited every school in the county and knows more about the 
conditions than he did previously. Teachers working hard for improve- 
ment of library conditions. School boards slow to act. Sent circulars 
to such as did not possess libraries. About forty districts voted to 
establish libraries this fall. Law relative to the transfers of library 
money to general funds if "the township board ascertain it to be more 
for the interest, etc., etc.," should be cut out. 

Number of libraries Id the county 95 

Number of schools having libraries 75 

Number of achoola not having libraries 60 

Number of free public libraries 1 

Educators of the county folly awake on the library proposition. 

A. O. Wilson. 

ISABELLA rOfNTY. 

Number of libraries, county 45 

Number of schools having libraries 40 

Number of schools with no libraries 70 

Number of free public libraries In towns, etc 3 

There is a little activity among the teachers and more with the school 
commissioner. The money is almost always used for school purposes 
instead of library purposes. 

I think the last week in June and not later than July 1st, would be 
the best time for making the report as in a number of counties the new 
commissioner takes his office then and is not familiar with the work. 

H. A. Orj^ijam. 



22 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

KEWEENAW COLSTV. 

At present I do not aee any more convenient time foi- reporting on the 
libraries of the county. There is no particular activity on library matters 
at present. The most ofour schools are in little mining camps'. There 
are a few very good libraries in the county; most of the books are rather 
old. There are three public libraries (township). Three of our achooli* 
have fairly good libraries, while most of the schools have a few books, 
hardly worthy the name of a library. In some cases library money is 
used for general school matters. 

F. M. Bradsiiaw. 

LAPEER COUNTY, • 

There are one hundred eight libraries in this county, one hundred 
three of which are school. Thirty-one schools have no libraries, but with 
constant urging on the part of the teachers and commissioner, I believe 
this number may be reduced one-half within the year. Three libraries 
are public. To my knowledge forty-four schools have either added new 
libraries or increased old ones to an amount aggregating the sum of 
1516.00 the past year, I am making it a personal matter this year to 
see that every district uses its library fund for no other purpose, and 
with the assistance of the teachers have accomplished the above result. 
Feeling runs high at present throughout the county favoring school 
libraries and the situation is highly satisfactory. 

W. Frank Lauohlin. 

LCCE COUNTY. 

As to the date upon which county school commissioners are required 
to make their report to the State Library, the present one (June) is 
satisfactory to me. We have but two public libraries in the county and 
both have been neglected. I regret that we lack a proper library spirit 
among our township officers and teachers, but believe these conditions 
will change as the population of the county inpreases. Of the fifteen 
schools in the county, there is not one having a library, the funds for 
which having been used for general school purposes. 

The McMillan township library is located at the school building in 
Newberry, so the school has use of the library to a limited extent but 
as the library has not had proper care for the past few years, it is not in 
good condition. 

If in any way I may be able to aid the Board of Library Commissioners 
in their work in this county, I should be very glad to do so. 

Eva C. Beurmann. 

macomb county. 

Now that I have become acquainted with each school in Macomb 
county, I can report at any time. Do not think the "teachers are imbued 
with the library spirit," and "they do not use their best efforts to build, 
etc." I always ask the teacher about the library, and many times find 
that the teacher does not know whether the district has a library or not. 
and never have found a teacher who could tell the number of books, 
and much less the kind, etc. Much of the librarv fund is diverted, to 

■ L,,.,.;,. ;,e.OOQlC 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 23 

general school purposes. 1 shall take pleasure in seconding all efforts 
to establish libraries in our midst. 

Number of libraries In county 57 

Number of schools having no libraries 5S 

Number of schools having libraries 66 

Number of free public libraries in towns and cities 1 

O. D. Thompson. 

MABQUBTTE COUNTY. 

In this county, library funds are commonly diverted to pay for supple- 
mentary reading matter for tbe schools. As nearly all of the schools are 
provided with free text-boobs, this is an easy step for school offlcers to 
take. 1 have read of tbe plan of the State loaning books, but have no 
specific information on the subject. 

F. D. Davis. 

MENOMINEB COUNTY. 

Teachers are doing much to obtain libraries for the pupils by enter- 
taiomeiita, etc. More tlian half of our schools have libraries, some are 
small. We seek: to buy books suitable for the children's reading and to 
supplement their school work. The library money is almost invariably 
used for general purposes. This option should be taken from tbe boards 
so tliat tbis money could not be thus diverted. Some of our schools 
have availed themselves of the privileges of the State Circulating Li- 
brary, but change of teachers interferes with the working of this ex- 
cellent plan. 

Jbsse Hubbabd. 

MIDLAND COrXTY. 

There are seveniy-two or seventy-three schools in this county and 1 
think I am not far from right iPLen I say at least fifty j>er cent have 
libraries of some "sort" though some of the libraries are very good. 
There are not more than one or two township libraries in tbe county. A 
considerable part of the money which should Jse nsed for libraries is 
diverted to general school purposes. However, the prospects for library 
advancement are very fair, though the advance must be led by the 
teacher for the vast majority of patrons, as a rule, "follow" in school 
matters and accept no reform until a sentiment is created in them for 
that reform. 

J, H. MtSTARO. 
MONTCALM COUNTY. 

In Montcalm county we have: 

Thirty-two district libraries. 

Ten township libraries. 

Three town and city libraries. 

One hundred and nine districts not having libraries. 

Clearly all of the districts have small collections of books that are 
being added to each year and can soon be called libraries. Teachers are 



24 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

active in trying to establish district libraries, t wish the State might 
Bend out 9 few volumes, selected by the Board of Library Commissioners 
to each school. School boards are slow to act with regard to such work, 
bat if a start were made, I think that they would take more interest. 

EtJOENE StEUIGHT. 
MUSKRUON COUNTY. 

There has been no change as to number of libraries since last report. 
Fewer schools have libraries than last year because we have so many 
district officers that furnish nothing toward building up or keeping the 
libraries now established. Some activity among teachers but no steady, 
persistent effort. As commisBioner, I could do nothing but library work 
for the next two years and then just a nice start would be made. I am 
sorry 1 cannot devote all my time to the work. 

The making of library report in graduation time among schools ia 
very ditBcalt. Poasibly if report came in vacation months of July and 
August it would meet with more favor and attention, 

H. B. Caer. 

' NBWAYQO COUNTY. 

Interest in school libraries is general in this county. Nearly all of 
the schools in the better districts have a few books and in some of the 
richest communities quite large libraries have been collected. Most of 
the libraries have been founded and are kept up by money raised by 
teachers by socials, etc. Quite a large number of schools have raised 
from flO.OO to |2«.00 in that way this year. One school raised f65.00 
last year. Probably above seyenty-flve per cent of our schools have 
libraries of Bome description. My work takes too much of my time and 
energy to allow rae to collect library statistics. 

A, Gordon Dye. 

OCEIANA county. 

In Oceana county there are eighty-nine school districts. Of this num- 
ber, eight have no libraries while forty have libraries that have been 
CBtablisbed by vote of the district. Some of the largest libraries in the 
county schools are maintained in the forty-one remaining districts, such 
libraries having been established through school socials. The libraries 
range in size from ten to one hundred twenty volumes. In general the 
libraries are well managed, there being a librarian who, under the 
teacher's supervision, has charge of the books. Few books are lost or 
destroyed. Libraries that have been establiBhed are being constantly 
added to, th6 teachers having become imbued with the library spirit. 
Something that might be very suggestive and helpful along the line of 
school library management may be had by writing to Miss Euraine 
Evans, Houseman, Michigan, teacher of District No. 5, Elbridge town- 
ship, Oceana county. 

Vesta B. Smith. 

• OTSEGO county.. 

June ia a good time for requiring library reports, as commissioners 
who are going out of office would be closing up matters, and also in the 
latter part of that month full reports on many matters must be n 
by the commissioners to the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



C 



REPORTS OF CODNTY COMMISSIONEHS OF SCHOOLS. 25 

Tbe oo)y fault that I find with the law requiring commisBioDere to 
report on libraries in June ia that there seems to be no law requiring 
those persons having cliarge uf libraries to report to the eommissioners, 
BO that he may have data for his report. Please notice the enclosed 
clippings which were printed in the '•Moderator" from circulars which 
I had previously sent out twice to every teacher in Otsego county, I 
am thoroughly in sympathy with the library spirit, and am ^lad to see 
the Board pushing the matter in such a large way. I have started out to 
have a well-selected working library in every school in this county, and 
have succeeded in about two-thirds of the schools. I place an envelope 
of well selected library catalogues in every school ; talk library at every 
opportunity and am generally asked by the teachers to make out a list 
of a balanced library for the school, and I follow the matter up until I 
see the books and the pioneer collections actually in tbe school house, 
and in intelligent use. 1 have personally assisted the board of school 
inspectors of two townships to select a large order of a class of books 
better than usual and through a friend of mine have done the same fot- 
a third township. ^ 1 have been able to do the same for a Sunday school 
library. Being upon the Gaylord school board, I am able to arrange for 
the purchase of about fifty dollars worth of new books each year. 

Number ot township libraries In county 6 

Number of scboole baving libraries 30 

Number of scbools having no libraries 13 

Number of free public libraries In county 

There is activity among educators here in library matters. The 
. money which should be used for libraries is diverted to general school 
purposes. The law should be changed at once so as to stop mercenary 
persons from doing this. I am familiar with the plan of organizing free 
public libraries, and think it generous and admirable. Hope to take this 
plan up in Gaylord. 

R. A. Bailey. 

rRESQLB ISI.E COUNTY. 

I think reports should be made September 30th of each year. We have 
only a few libraries in our county, not over one-half dozen, they are 
poorly kept and few additions of new books are made each year. It is 
my intention to call the attention of the proper authorities to the bene- 
fits derived from a well kept and assorted library. This county has no 
free public libraries. I do not think there will be any difficulty in placing 
libraries in most of our schools. 

Edward Erskine. 
roscommon cointy. 

Number of libraries In Roacommoa county 8 

Number of schoola having no libraries 12 

Number of achools having libraries i 

Number of tree public libraries 4 

Interest in libraries is growing. Only one or two districts which have 
diverted library money to school purposes. I believe the report on 
libraries should be made at the same time as the school inspectors' re- 
ports are made. D,3,,z.<j.;yL.OOQlC 



_.OOQlC 

. 0. PiTSB. 



26 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COHMISSIONERS. 

SAGINAW COLNTT. 

I have yoavB id regard to the library report required from commiB- 
sionerB. I do think a change in the matter is desirable, as we have not 
always the data wanted, but just what that change should be, I am not 
at present prepared to say. The library movement is very popular in this 
county, and many schools have libraries although they may not be legally 
established. . I tike the plan of the Board of Library Commissioners in 
encouraging the establishment of local libraries by loaning books. It 
has muoh to do with the present tendency to push the work. 

John C. Nafe. 

SHIAWASSEE COtSTY. 

The library spirit in this county is excellent especially among the 
teachers. This is true among many of the patrons also. There are 
one hundred twenty-flve school districts in all, including cities and vil- 
lages. Each of the nine city and village schools has a library. There 
are seventy-five district school libraries. There is one township library 
and three public libraries in cities and villages. Very little of the floe 
money is used for general school purposes. 

O. Ij. Bbistol. 

ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 

Since the only data at the command of the commissioner is from the 
inspectors' annual reports, which are received at his office in October, 
I think that the reports to the State Librarian should be made after this . 
time. There are three township, three city school, two village, and one 
hundred twenty-flve district school libraries in this county. There are 
twenty-five schools which have no libraries. Port Huron city has the 
only free public library in the county. There are some private libraries 
about which I have been unable to find anything definite. Our teachers 
and a large number of the school officers seem very much interested in the 
establishment and maintenance of the public school libraries and the 
money for the most part goes to their support. 

I think that the present library law is faulty in the following par- 
ticulars: First, the State, Superintendent makes the apportionment of a 
county fund from incomplete statistics. Second, the commissioner is 
asked to make reports concerning township, village and city libraries, 
while none of the officers connected with these libraries make reports 
to him. Third, that the officers who have the management of these 
libraries are often incompetent to select saitable books for school or 
public libraries. Fourth, that all school libraries should be kept at the 
school house during the time school is in session. I frequently find them 
at the home of one of the officers. I would suggest that the State Superin* 
tendent and the State Librarian or the roramiseioner of schools should 
prepare lists of books from which libraries are selected, that the commis- 
sioner should have supervision over all the libraries in the county, that 
the apportionment of public money should be made through the office of 
commissioner of schools, and definite financial and library reports 
shoMid be made to him by each librarian. 

T have endeavored during my term of office to divert the money t 
the township to district school libraries. Last year, there were~ k 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 27 

tioned $2,912.00, nbout eij^iteen cents per- capita. The total number of 
volumes in tlie district schoo) libraries is 7.527. This does not include 
the public school libraries of Wt. Clair city, Marine City and Port Huron. 

R. 8. Campbell. 

TUSCOLA COUNTY. 

We have about seventy-five B<;hool libraries in Tuscola county. 
Some however are very small, numberinj; not more than ten volumes. 
In my judgment the last of June would be the best time for com- 
missioners to report. It would naturally come at that time. We have 
one Imndred forty-nine schools and about peventy-four are without libra- 
ries. I (lb not know of one free public library in the county. There are 
several township libraries, worthless however since they are not conducted 
properly and are made up of very poor selections of books. The only 
special effort made for a library I have ever heard of in the county was 
that at Caro. As a rule library money is nsed for other school purposes. 
This is a practice I am trying to overcome and in a number of cases it 
has been abandoned and money used for library purposes. Hoping the 
above contains the information you desire, I remain. 

H. P. Bi-SH. 

VAN BrRE.\ COfNTY. 

Number of ecbools In county wltb libraries 107 

Number of ecbools in county wltbout libraries 46 

Number of tovnshlps with libraries 7 

Townships— No. Vols. 

Arlington 437 

Geneva 600 

Hamilton 585 

Keeler 648 

lawrence 600 

Pine Grovo IBO 

South Haven 3,060 

Other libraries are: 

Ladies' library. Hartlord LllO 

Coterie library. Paw Paw 300 

Scott Club, South Haven 200 

Ladles' library, Decatur 630 

Xearly all of our teachers are interested in school libraries and many 
of the district libraries are the result of socials, especially in those 
towns having township libraries, and the larger part of additions come 
from the same source. Perhaps half the districts use library moneys for 
general purposes. 

On the whole there is a steady, healthy growth in library sentiment 
among teachers and patrons, and I shall use my best efforts to have 
library moneys applied to that purpose. 

E, A. ASBLTIXE. 

iCommisiioner. 

D,3nz.,J.;X-OOQlC 



28 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

WAYNE COl'NTY. 

The library money ie pretty generally useiJ for library purposes by 
school boards. The reason for not seoding for the loan of books is that 
I infer from the rules that we are not eligible, not having one hundred 
registered books in the office on hand. I think if the Library Commission 
would change these rules to allow the county school commissioners to have 
the loan of books it would be a great help and they would be much better 
distributed, because teachers would be much better acquainted with their 
value J)y using them from the school commipsioner's office. If it can be 
arranged sp that this office can receive the loan we have every conrenience 
and I assnre you it would be much appreciated. 

Number of libraries tn Wayne county ; 131 

Number of BchoolB bavlng libraries 128 

Number ot schools with no libraries 14 

Number of schools with libraries not reported 10 

Number of free public lll>rarles In towns and cities 3 

Activity in library matters among educators fairly good. Is library 
money used for library purposes? Prettv generally. 

E. W. Yost, • 
Commissioner, 



WEXFORD COrXTi". 

The library spirit in this county is not what it should be, and prospects 
for library advancement are not good. Mont all of our teachers are 
young and have not learned the value of a good library and are not 
interested in the library movement. We have fifty-three libraries in the 
county, thirty-six schools have. libraries, in many cases only a few books, 
forty-three schools have no libraries, and there are peventeen free public 
libraries io the towns and cities. The money which should be used for 
libraries is in nearly all cases diverted to general school purposes. 

C. C. Slemons. 



BOOKS FOR SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP LIBKARIES. 

WALTER II. FRENCH. DEPrTT StTERINTENDRNT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Townphip and school district libraries have passed the experimental 
stage. Xo one questions their value and nearly everj'one admits the 
fact that good books are the best friends and companions young people 
can have. At the present time almost every publishing house has a list 
of books Fpecially designed for use in public libraries, but notwith- 
standing this, the fact still remains that in many localities there have 
been purchased and placed in the hands of children books that were, 
first, poorly bound and poorly edited, and second, hooks that are either 
wholly unfit for the use of young people, or hooks so poorly written that 
the literary tapfe of the individual is lowered rather than hnproved by 
their penisal. Money which is put into unfit or improper reading 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCH001.S, 29 

material ia worse than wasted. Tiie downfall of many young men and 
women can be traced directly to the books or papers which they have 
read. Instances all over the state could be cited to prove this statement. 

With all these facts before iis the question of selecting books for 
either a district or a public library becomes one of vital importance. 
The selection of books should not be left to those who are carel^s or who 
have not sufficient time to frive the matter careful and thorough atten- 
tion. In every school dlatrict, the school board is by law given the 
charge of the school library, and they have authority to appoint a li- 
brarian, or one member of the board may be librarian. In townships, 
the board of school inspectors have charge of and purchase books for 
the library, and the chairman of the board of school inspectors is by 
law the librarian and has the custody of the books. The county com- 
missioner of schools in every county is the advisory officer to all school ' 
boards and boards of school inspectors, and it would be highly advisable 
in all cases where libraries are to be established, or where additions are 
to be made to the library, that the district board, or the board of school 
inspectors, should secure the advice and counsel of the county com- 
missioner in making purchases of books. The county commissioner, 
through his educational training and wide experience with schools, and 
through his knowledge of the various publishing companies, should be 
a competent person to aid in making the selection of proper books. 
In addition to the county commissioner, the advice and counsel of the 
State Librarian, Mrs. Mary C. Spencer of Lansing, can be secured at 
any and all times. Mrc, Spencer has labored long and faithfully to im- 
prove the state library and various public tibraries of the state and is 
thoroughly conversant witli all the needs of such institutions. 

It should be remembei-ed that simply because a book is cheap is no 
indication that it is a good book or that it would be a proper one to be 
placed in a public librnr}'. The price should have little or nothing to do 
■with the selection. The subject matter, the author, and the binding of 
any book should be thoroughly considered. No book should be pur- 
chased which was not written by one of the standard authors, or one 
who is generally considered to be an authority on the subject treated. 
In selecting books for school libraries it is of the highest importance to 
consider the subject matter, I>ecause books which would be perfectly 
rlear and intelligible to adult persons might be beyond the comprehen- 
sion of the children who would be expected to use them. Books for 
school libraries should be written in a clear, concise style, and should 
treat of subjects which are either directly or indirectly related to the 
work of the schoolroom. This would include books of travel, history, 
biography, geography, stories, and literature. Very few, if any, works 
of liotion should be placed in any ordinary school library. Such works 
may be studied by students in high schools, but they are of compara- 
tively little value in the grades. 

For township libraries the same subjects as those mentioned above 
should be included, also standard works of fiction, becauE« the books 
from a township library will be used very largely by the adult popula- 
tion, and in every case it pays to purchase well twund and durable books. 

Teachers in the public schools should make a study of the library 
question and should thoroughly acquaint themseh'es with the best 
books and the best authors on various subjects. It would bc^ ■perfectly 



30 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

proper for the county commiaaioner of schools to arrange for instruc- 
tion in the subject of library means and methods at the several county 
teachers' associations, and all teachers' institutes. Every institute con- 
ductor should be able and willing to give one or more talks on the sub- 
ject of libraries, instructing the teachers how to select books, what 
kind of books to select, and where to get them. While libraries have 
been known for hundreds of years, it is only within a comparatively 
recent period that any systematic attempt has been made to study the 
question and devise plans for securing working libraries and for their 
maintenance and protection. It is also of recent date that works have 
been produced which were at all suitable for the general purpose of 
school libraries. But there is no longer any excuse for any school 
district in the State of Michigan refraining from or refusing to organize 
and establish a library. Our laws are sufficient for this purpose and it 
merely needs the, attention and careful consideration of the patrons, 
teachers and officers to secure this great boon to every child in our State. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF TOWNSHtP AND DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARIES. 

ny R. D. BAILEV. COMMIHSIOXER OF SCnOOLE, OTSEGO COrNTY. 

A library may become one of the strongest educational and i-eflning 
influences in a township. I regret to say, however, that on account of 
-the wi'ctched class of books chosen and the utter neglect of the library 
by those in charge, this end is rarely attained. 

As the law now stands, the township library is in charge of the town- 
ship board of school inspectors, who ai-e seldom chofcn with a view to 
their fitness for the important work they have to do. This board should 
have quite a high degree of literary .taste, as they need to prepare the 
mental bill of fare to a great extent for their fellow citizens. They 
should not at the beginning buy books altogether above the level of the 
readers but should begin with as high a grade as their taste will permit, 
and then seek systematically and pei-sistently to elevate that grade. 

In the typical township library there is almost nothing to tempt the 
young to spend rainy days or dull evenings with a good book, and but 
little to lead to a love of books or to good reading. 

The board of inspectors should put a person in charge of the library 
because he is efficient and iMjcanse he exerts himslf to extend its cir- 
culation and usefulness and not to give him an easy job or to help in 
some political pull. 

Township library boards (the board of pchool inspectors) should seek 
to have the library in a central place, in a clean cheerful i-ooni and the 
books arranged in neat cases. 

For one dollar enough slips can be printed to advertise the library 
through the towuship. I^t the slip read like this: "The library of — ^ 
Township is kept at John Doe's, the books are free to any resident 
of the township, on the following days aud evenings of each week. 
(Here name the time.) The library is public property and we wish 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 31 

to see every man, woman and child use it. We have just added 
the following new books. (Here name them.) Beaides these, the fol- 
lowing books of tTie old stock will be found vei-y profitable and enter- 
taining. (Here name thirty or forty of the very best of the old books.) 
Our library contains something good and profitable for boys and girls, 
men and women. 

Remember this: 

A good book is a safe companion for man or child. 

Many men have improved their chances in life by private study of 
helpful books. 

Many homes are dull for young people, who leave tbem because they 
have little or no interesting i-eading matter. 

A few minutes snatched now and then, and spent in reading, will keep 
a person from idleness, gossip and loafing, and will give in return an 
acquaintance with the best thoughts of great men. 

Without price yon and your families may have entertainment, and 
the best thoughts of all the ages instead of neighborhood gossip. Come 
over, bring your family and select some books for each, ae regularly as 
you get your groceries. 

Very respectfully. 

Board of gchool Inspectors. 

The books should be chosen at intervals not too long apart. It keeps 
up interest better to put in twenty-flve new, fresh books, and to put in 
twenty-five more in six months, and so on, ihan to put them all in at 
once and to have the whole number come at once and thus lose their 
freshness and attracfiveness. 

Books should not be ordeifd in sets, as nearly every author has some 
dull volumes and to devote much money and space to one author limits 
the range of the library. Job lots of boitks should not be bought. 

Books should not be bought of agents as an exorbitant price is always 
paid in such cases. 

Books should not be bought by the yard, simply to fill up the shelves 
with all the titles in some fancy named edition at eighteen cents a 
volume. 

Books should, however, be bought for the busy father and mother; 
for the progressive father who wishes to learn more about scientific 
gardening, stock-raising, fruit culture, fertilizers, home grounds, etc.; 
for the intelligent mother who no doubt was a well-bred girl, and who 
in early life followed lier husband to the farm; for (he young man who 
remains on the fai-m to help his father and is proud of it, but who reas- 
onably desires a widened horizon; for the daughter of the family, 
for the hired help; for the restless boy who craves history, biography, 
hero stories and tales of adventure, but let the latter be of the whole- 
some claFs of which there is an abundance; for the children of the 
family, nature stories, science stories, pure literatui-e, a general abun- 
dance of the large supply now in the market for children. 

So small a sum as fifty dollars a year, steadily and intelligently spent 
by the library board, year after year, on books selected, by experts, 
would doubtless do much toward the proper rearing of the youth of any 
township. 



32 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSI ONERS, 

If library boardB do not know liow to select a well balanced library, 
ttiey should coDsult someone who is at least a fair judge of books and of 
people and their literary needs. They might state their needs to the 
State Librarian, to the county commissioner of schools, to the superin- 
tendent of schools, or to some bright local school teacher. 

Local teachers of rural schools in the township should promptly 
familiarize tbemsetves with the library, and recommend books to pupils 
personally find individually; should draw books to use at school, get a 
loan of unused books in the township library for the school for the 
term of the year; be at the library by appointment with pupils to assist 
them to a wise choice of attractive reading. 

It is unfortunate that more townships do not take advantage of the 
generous offer of the State Library and secure one of the circulating 
sets of fifty (50) well selected volumes, which may be retained three 
months or longer, and which may be obtained by application to the 
State Librarian. 

AH grange libraries may become roistered with the State Library 
as the law provides, allowing patrons of the grange library certain 
valuable privileges in the State Library. Among which is the loan of 
hooks from that department. 

Every township library in the State of Michigan may become aflBliated 
with the State Library by promising to use its money, received from 
fines, exclusively for library purposes. Under that system a loan of 100 
books is offered by the Board of Library Comissioners. 

The county commissioner of schools can do much to assist in increas- 
ing the efficiency of the township library. He visits each school dis- 
trict in the township. Let him ui^e the teacher to an intelligent use of 
the library for the school; let him speak urgently to all the school about 
using the library. Let him agree to review pupils' essays on library 
books read. Let him urge teachers at their institutes and associations 
to be active in library matters. 

The commissioner should see to it that the township library receives 
its share of attention on the program of the Farmers' Institute. He 
has large opportunity, by virtue of his oflBce, to influence the members of 
the board of school inspectors by letter, and by frequently meeting them 
on his drives, and on the streets. He may get the editor of the local 
paper to help the good work along by a well-worded paragraph now and 
then. 

A broad gauged commissioner can carefully collect the names of all 
who in his county have charge of school, Sunday school, township or 
other libraries, and quietly seek ways and means of gaiuing their atten- 
tion to the important subject of additions of real merit to all their 
' libraries. 

In the matter of district libraries: to foster with jealous care a col- 
lection of good books in each and every school house is one of the best 
works in which the county commissioner of schools, the teacher or the 
school board, can be engaged, and all should work as a unit to place in 
each school such a collection, to keep it revivified by frequent well-chosen 
additions and to insist upon its systematic use. 

The patron should pay taxes for this puriJOse, perhaps more cheer- 
fully than for any other object for which he is taxed. 

The life of a dollar, spent in school or township libraries, is perennial. 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 33 

Unlike the dollar spent for clotliefl, food, wcM)d, etc., its influence lives 
un and on. Fifteen dollars may eeem to some sparsely populated dis- 
tricts to be a large amount of monej to spend for books. Strange, that 
school rooms, the very home of letters, the natui'al place for books, have 
been until recently in all, and are yet in many districts, absolutely 
barren of well-chosen working libraries. 

The law provides means by which any pchool district, city, village or 
rural, may establish a district library. When so established the dis- 
trict. library is entitled to its proportionate share of the township 
library money on hand and that may come in. Until they are better 
managed, many township libraries would do more good broken up and 
in the hands of the eager children and the active teachers of tbe several 
schools of the township; but. while there are many advantages in having 
a school district library, subject to the demand of any resident of the 
district, there are disadvantages and embarrassments connected with 
such a system. 

ft^ith the present vicious tendency to divert library money to general 
school purposes, the loss of this and of the districts' share of the anti- 
quated books of the township library, by not becoming a purely district 
libraiT. are too trivial to be set against having a well balanced private 
school reference library, always on hand and always in good, condition. 

Tbe State Normal Schools should give their students, our future 
teachers, drill in library economy, for districts of the kind in which the 
student in the rural course of a normal school should drill in the choice 
of a well balanced library for rural schools of different sizes and number 
of grddes. She should know why to select certain books, their price, how 
to order, be familiar with a wide range of publishers' catalogues, should 
drill in using the library in various ways in school, and be trained in 
populariziug the library. This came idea would apply to the teachers 
of the city and village schools. 

Principals and superintendents of schools, whose students are expect- 
ing to teach, should give all aid in their power in the same direction. 
As for the commissioner of schools, he is inexcusable if he is not always 
on the alert to do something for tbe lihrarj' movement. 

In all seeking, getting and using libraries, the great aim should be 
utility, not show, smalt, crisp bookn; quality, not quantity. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



RBFORT OF BOARD OF UBRART C0UUI88I0NBES. 



PUBLIC, SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP LIBRARIES 



SDPPOBTeZ> BY TAXATION AND E1NE5. 



Ltbrariet oontainbtg from too U 



TowDship aod 
district U^arles. 


|1 


Township and 
district libraries. 


■si 

S5 


Allegan Co.: 


316 
250 
240 
224 
450 
211 

300 

486 
400 
3t5 
218 
293 
211 

263 

220 
214 

273 
431 
461 

398 
300 


BavCo.: 

Beaver, T 














MaiilIus,T 
























AlpeimCo.: 

Alpena, T 


Ben lie Co.: 


282 
366 




Blaine, T ." . 




Inland, T 






Joyfleld.T. 

Platt«, T 




Kearwiey, T 


205 


Milton, T 


Berrien Co.: 

Berrien, D 




Star, T 






















Hagar, D 




SlandUh, D 












Baragra Ck>.: 


Lake, T 




La(ie.D 


260 




Lincoln. D 


260 












Barry Co. : 




2U3 


Aasyrlft, D... 










210 

371 
234 


Carlton, T 










Waiervliet, D 





i=,L.ooglc 



PREB PUBLIC. SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP LIBRARIBB. 
LibraTiet eorOaining from too io 600 tolwnu.— Continued, 



Township and 
•distrlfil libraries. 


i 


Townahip and * 
dletricl libraries. 


'si 


Branch Co.: 


234 
265 
212 
350 
200 
400 
2S0 

300 
400 
411 
308 
213 
320 
200 

201 
2S2 
230 
210 
200 
367 
212 
403 

426 
280 
301 
200 

300 
200 
256 
277 

217 

203 
300 
321 
200 

2:5" 
223 
243 


Clinton Co.-O>n(..- 




Callforni»,T 


















Crawford Co.: 


















Calhoun Co.: 


Dell* Co.: 






































CaasCo.: 


Dickinson Co.: 


230 
436 






MaroeUus,D 


Eaton Co.: 


Penn, D 


420 
477 
210 
4S0 










Porter, T 


















250 
230 








Emmet Co.: 




















285 




Genesee Co.: 






Nunda, D 


300 
200 


Chippewa Co.: 


Burton, D 




296 




































Clinton Co.: 

Bath, T 


Gladwin Co.: 

Beaverton. D 


200 




275 















i=,L.ooglc 



RBPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRART COMHIBSIONBRS. 
L3>raria eontaining from tOO to 600 wriume*. —Cpallaued. 



Towostaip and 
district libraries. 




Township and 
district Ubraries. 




Gogebic Co.: 


235 

377 
400 
463 
232 
343 

280 
212 

200 
209 
300 

364 
277 
400 

240 

476 
230 
*00 
502 
200 

252 
400 

250 
225 

300 

375 
258 
332 

328 

349 
230 

300 


Jackson Co.— C<mf.; 


















Hanover, D 




Fife Lake, T. . 












Springport, D 

Kalamazoo Co.: 










287 
















Kalkaska, D 


205 


EUladaleCo.: 

Adams, D 


Kent Co.: 










Houffliton Co.: 


Paris, D 


204 






















200 
















Keweenaw Co.: 




















Lake Co.: 




Ingham Co.: 


412 




Cherry Valley. T 


3V2 








Ionia Co.: 


Lapeer Co.: 

Deerfleld, T 






446 






240 








lOBCoCo.: 








374 














Iron CO' 




Iron River, T. 


Cenlerville, T. 


287 
26S 














Isabella, T 




296 








Jackson Co.: 


Leelaoau. T , 


369 












'"■='"'■■""' 


c^^'- 



-FREE PUBLIC, SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP LIBEAKIES. 
Libraries <xntaining from tOO to 600 wrfumw.— Continued. 



Township and 
dlBtrlci Ubraries. 


OS 


Township and 
diBtrict libraries. 


J 


Lenawee Co.: 


370 
254 
400 
331 
300 
430 
200 
431 
287 
206 

250 
490 
367 
361 

400 
400 
362 

314 
200 
384 
439 
■ 234 
257 
205 
283 
210 

225 
297 

200 
266 

450 
267 
320 
217 
297 

300 
312 
212 
230 


Menominee Co.: 




Blisafleld, D 


MlaaaukeeCo.: 


















^ 










Monroe Co.: 














Bedford, T 


450 


LiriDgBtOD Co.: 




368 


Dundee, T 




Genoa, T 


218 




RalainvDle, T 








Mackinac Co.: 


Montcalm Co.: 














262 












345 






261 
















Montmorency Co.: 














Muskegon Co.: 
















326 










Hollon.T 






254 








MarquelteCo.: 

Huroboll,T. 


North Muskegon, city 

SuUiTan.T.^ 

Newaygo Co.: 


238 
250 




204 






225 












250 








Summlt,T 








242 








Oakland Co.: 




























LiOOg 





REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY C0MMI8SI0NBRS. 



Librarita emUainiiis frvm tOO to 600 mlumu.— CoDtloued. 



Townahipwid 
dlslrlol libnrlea. 


i 


Township and 
district libnriM. 


J 


Oakland Co.-Qmt..- 


250 
270 
244 
422 
330 

326 
237 
■ 388 
228 
489 
260 
387 
468 

275 
200 

400 
300 
331 
43» 
- 420 
4U0 

206 
482 
245 
24B 
400 

406 
375 
450 
381 
380 
341 
397 
267 
25U 

an 

215 
300 

245 
385 
324 


SBglnaw Co.-CVmt..' 


410 










KochviUe,D. 




Rniford.b 


401 




St. Clair Co.: 






432 










Pt^T..°:::::::::::::::'::;:: 




Elbridge, T 




270 














Newfleld, T 


9l Joaept Co.: 












Ogemaw Co.: 


White Pigeon, D 


350 


Sanilac Co.: 


















Burdell.T 




310 






42D 












346 




Schoolcraft Co.: 




OsceoV T 


226 






226 




Shiawassee Co.: 










200 


















450 


OlUwa Co.: 


Tuscola Co.: 






225 


Grand Haven, city 














210 


















322 
















Welle, T 


300 






Saginaw Co.: 


Van Buren Co.: 


403 












402 









,L.ooglc 



FRBB PUBUC, SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP UBRABIBS. 

LStraritB amtaining fnm too to BOO odumo.— Concluded. 



TowDBhlp Bad 
district libraries. 




Township and 
diMiiot lilM^ries. 


i 


V»n Buren Co.— CkmL: 


226 
233 

aoo 

260 
200 
200 
212 
400 

489 
430 
400 
323 
360 
339 

220 
318 
318 
200 
250 
200 
264 
306 
200 
438 
225 
270 
306 
400 
438 
452 
303 
262 
260 
240 
221 
238 
268 
277 


Wayne Ca-Oonf.; 


$? 




Monguairon.D 




300 










Nankin, D 


246 






200 










Nankin.D 


373 




















Uma, T . . . . 




200 


















240 


ICrb^.:::::::::::::::;:;:: 












WnyneCo.: 


BomuluB, D 


460 












288 
















Bumpter, D 








Dearborn, D 




262 
























3S8 
















Weitard Co.: 




Hamtramott, D, Highland P'k 








393 
















Selma, T 


295 














w"xford,T..:' ■:::;.■■' 


430 









D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY C0MHIS8I0NBRS. 



Librariee containing from 500 to 1,000 uoiumM. 



Alcona Co.: 
' Horriaville, T ... 

Alleg&n Co.: 

AlIeKBD.T 

Gun Plains, D . . 

Hopkins, T 

Monterej', T , . , 
Sanfi^atuclt, D 

Antrim Co.: 

Elk RapidB, D . . . 
Forest Home, D. 
Forest Home, T. 

Baraga Co. : 

L'Anse, V 

Bay Co.: 

Baneor, T 

Kawkawlin, T.. 
Bay City, scbool 
Portamouth, T.. 

Benzie Co.: 

Beozonia, T . . . . 

Berrien Co. : 

BertraDd, T 

Nile9,T 

Weesan, T , 

Braoch Ca : 

Girard, T. 

Union, D 

Calhoun Co.: 

Homer, V . 

Tekonsba, T 

CaesCo.: 

La Grange. D. ... 
Vollnia. T 

Clinton Co.: 

Blnebam, D 

Victor, T. 

Delta Co.: 

Garden, T 



Dickinson Co.: . 

Pelch,T 

Eaton Co.: 

KBlamo.T 

Oneida, D 

Windsor, T 

Emmet Co.: 

Little Traverse, T 

Genesee Co.: 

Richfield. T 

Grand Traverse Co.: 

Garfield. T 

Mayfield. T. 

Peninsula, T 

Hillsdale Co.: 

Fayette, D 

Woodbridge, T 

Houghton Co.: 

Adams, D 

Calumet, D 

Franklin, D 

Huron Co.; 

Rubicon, T 

Sand Beocb, T, 

Sebewaln^r, T 

Verona, D 

Ionia Co.: 

Belding, city 

Boston, D 

North Plains, Hubbardston 

Lib 

Portland, D 

Portland, T 

Iosco Co.: 

RastTawaa, city.... 

Oscoda, T 

Isabella Co.: 

Mt. Pleasant, city 



FREE PUBLIC, SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP UBRARIES. 
L&trarka containing from 500 to J.OOO tol^ma.—Coatiaacd. 



KiUamazoo Co.: 

Comstock, X) 

Schoolcraft, D.. 
SchoolcrMu T.. 

Kent Co.: 

Algoma, D 

ByrOD, T... 

Cascade, T 

Grattan, T. 

Sparta, D 

Lapeer Co.: 

Almont, D 

Hadley, D 

Lapeer, cUy 

Marathon, T 

Lenawee Co.: 

Blisafleld, D..... 

Btiaefleld, D 

Cambridge, T... 
Hudson, oity.... 

BudsoD, P 

Ogden, T 



Menominee Co.: 
Cedarvllle, T . . 
Meyer, T 



Montcalm Co. : 
Bloomer, D..... 

CryBtal, T 

Douglass, T 

Muskegon Co.: 

Montague, T.... 
Bavenna, T 

Newaygo Co.: 

Ensley, T 

Sheridan, D..... 

Oakland Co. : 

Farinlngtoa, T, 
Holly, 6 

Oceana Co.: 

Greenwood, T. . 

Hart, T 

Shelby, D 



Macomb Co.: 

Richmond, D 

Shelby, D 

Manistee Co. : 

Bear Lake, T 

Pllep, T 

Manistee, D 

Marquette Co.: 

Mlchigamme, T 

Negaunee, city 

Mason Co.: 

Amber, T 

Custer, T 

Grant, T 

Fere Marquette, T... 



Marquee 
nan, T . 
Victory, T. . . 



Osceola Co.: 

Highland, T 

Orient, T 

Osceola, D 

Oscoda Co.: 

Bagley.T 

Corwlth. T , 

Otsego Lake, T... 

Ottawa Co.: 

Georgetown, T. . . 

Robioaon, T 

Spring Lake, T.. 
Zeeland, D 



Saginaw Co.: 

Blumfield, T.... 
Bridgeport, T... 



RBPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY C0HHI8SI0NBRS. 
LUnuria containing f mm 500 to 1,000 MtunKs.— Concluded. 



Townsbip and 
dlatriot librftrioB. 


4 


TowtwUpand 
district UbrwriM. 


•si 


Socrlnaw Co.— Omt; 


836 
8TI 

850 
615 

600 
980 

500 
540 

760 
600 

053 
540 
066 

530 
800 
700 


Van Bureo Co.: 

GflQeTa,T 


726 




Haniillon,T 








Sl Clair Co.: 








Washtenaw Co.: 








St. Clair, oily 
















St. JoMpfa Co.: 


Wayne Co.: 






















HamiramcK, D. 






















Sprln^wellB, Dolray Tillaare.- 




Hazelton.T 










Tuscola Co. : 


Wexford Co.: 























D,„„.db, Google 



PRBB PUBLIC, SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP LIBRARIES. 



Ubrariet containing 1,000 and more twlumet. 



BanrCo.: 

CHlletOD, D 

HaetiDgs, oitf 

Bar Co.: 

Bay City 

FnokenluBl, D 

West Bay City 

Benzie Co.: 

Benzonla, Aoad. 

Crystal Lake 

Berrien Co.: 

BeotoQ Harbor, city. . 

Buchaaan, T 

Nile8,cltv 

St. Joaepfa, tchool .... 
Three Oaks, T 

BnocbOo.: 

BrODsOD, T 

Gold water, city. 

UdIoii, T 

Calhoun 'Co.: 

Albion, ladles' 

Albion, city 

BatUe Creek, city.... 
Marshall, school 

OaMCo.: 

CaBsopolls, village . . . 
Dowagiac, city 

CharleTOix Co.: 

Charlevoix, T 

Pealne 



3,oei 

2,000 
lfl,7I9 
2,000 



3,606 
2,02S 



Cranford Co.: 

Orayling, T 

Delta Co.: 

Escanaba, city 

Dickinson Co.: 

Breilung.T 

Iron Mountain, city 

Norway, public school... . 

Eaton Co.: 

Bellevue, T 

Charlotte, city 

Chester, T 

Walton, T 

Bmmet Co.: 

Petoskey, city 

Oenesee Co.: 

Atlas, ladles' 

Atla«, Goodrich ladies'... 
Fenton, village 

Gogebic Co.: 

Bessemer, city 

IroDwood, city 

Ironwood, public school,. 

Grand Traverse Co. : 

Grant. T., 

Traverse City 

Gratiot Co.: 

Arcada, D 

Ithaca, D 

St. Louis, city 

Hillsdale Co.: 

Hillsdale, ladies' 

Hillsdale, public school . . 
JonesvlUe, ladies' 

Houghton Co.: 

Calumet, city 

Calumet, D 

Hancock, D 

Houghton, city 

Osceola, D , 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMHISSIONBRS. 
IMraria amUUnhtg 1,000 and more n)Iume8.— Cootinued. 



HouKhton Co.~Cont.: 

Portage, D 

Quincy, T 

Soboolcrart, T . . , 

Ingbsm Co.: 

UinfliDg, city 

Vevay, D 



Marquette Co.: 

Obampion, T 

ChocoUy.T 

lehpemlDg, city.. 
Republic, T 



Kalamazoo Co.: 

Kalamazoo, city 

ScboolcraU, cily 

Kent Co.: 

Grand Raplde, city. . 

Ijowell, D 

Lowell.T 



Lenawee Co.: 

Adrian, city 

Adrian, college 

Ridfreway, Tillage.. 
Tecuroseb, village.. 

LlviDgBtoD Co.: 

Eowell, D 

Howell, village..... 



1,000 
2.100 

*.687 

22,382 

28,672 
1,202 

58,132 
3,709 
1,069 
1,219 

1,000 

1,030 



16,400 
6,000 
1,650 
3,500 



Montcalm Co.: 

Greenville, city.. 
Stanton, city 

Muskegon Co.: 

Muskegon, city... 
Whli«ball, D . . . . 
Whitehall, T 

Oakland Co.: 

Holly, village... 

Pontlac 

BoyalOak 

Oceana Co.: 

Pentwater, T — 

Shelby, T 

Weet Branch . . . . 

Osceola Co.: 

Hartwlck 

Richmond 



Macomb Co.: 

Bruce, D 

Mt. Clemens, city .. 



Saginaw Co.: 

Saginaw, city 

Saginaw City, Hoyt.. 



i.vCoogle 



FREE PUBLIC, SCHOOL AND TOWNSHIP LIBRAHIES. 
Libraries containing 1,000 and more volumes. — Coacluded. 



Tow ash ip and 
district libraries. 


ll 


Tonuship and 

district libraries, i 


J ■ 
1^ 


SagiDawCo.-Cont..' 


B,826 
1,427 

8,663 

1.168 
3,050 
4,734 

6.402 

1,424 

2,800 
1,000 


Van BurenCo.: 








3,000 
7,643 


St. Clair Co.: 


Wsshtenaw Co. : 

Ana Arbor 




St. Joseph Co.: 












Ypsilanti, Norm^ 


22,000 




Wayne Co.: 




















Nor^hville, D 


1,040 




Northville, village 


2,500 




Springwells, D 


1.8ft4 


Tuscola Co. : 


Wexford Co.: 











Note. —For Culler scailstliw oC 111 



iF Board ot Llbnr; CotnmisalODent 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

STATE BOARD 

LIBEAEY COMMISSIONEES 

MICHIGAN 

FOB THE YEAR ENDING' DECEMBER 81, 1903 



_ aulTU PRINTING CO.. STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

'■ o 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



FOURTH ANNUAL EEPOBT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBEAET COMMISSIOIEES 



MICHIGAN 



FOE THE TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 81, 1903 



0O.S 'jle 



D,„„.db, Google 



FOUBTH ANNUAL REP(JKT 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



State 

Board of Libbaby Oouhissionebs 

Lansing, Mich. 



Mk. £ 



Hb. B. R. Pattihgtu.. Lanalng. 
II>, Jake B. Pbtih. Saaloa*. 
MB. David E. Hhihimaii, Detroit. 
Uaa. H. O. Sfihckr. I,aiutDK. 

Seoretiuj. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Au Sable, Michigan-, March 3, 1904. 
To Hon. Aabon T. Bliss, 

Oovemor of Michigan. 
Sir — I have the honor to submit the report of the State Board of 
Ubrary Conmiisflioiiers for the year 1903. 

Very respectfully, 

H. N. Loud, 
President. 



Dignz.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



ACT ESTA.BLISH1NG BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



PUBLIC ACTS, 1899. 

[No. 115.] 

AN ACT to create a State Board of Library Commissioners, to promote 
the establishment and efficiency of free public libraries, and to provide 
an appropriation therefor. 

The People of the State of Michigan enact: 

Sbc. 1, The Governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate, 
shall appoint four persons, residents of this State, who, together with 
the State Librarian, who shall be a member ex-oGQcio, shall constitute 
a Board of Library Commissioners. Two members of said Board shall 
be appointed fop a term of four years and two for a term of two years, 
and thereafter the term of office shall he four years. All vacancies 
occurring in the appointive membership of said Board, whether by expira- 
tion of term of office or otherwise, shall be filled by the Governor, with 
the advice and consent of the Senate. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the Library Commission to give advice 
and counsel to all free libraries in the State, and to all communities 
which may propose to establish them, as to the best means of establish- 
ing and administering such libraries, the selection of books, catalogning, 
and all other details of library management. In January of each year 
the Board shall make a report to the Governor of its doiDgs, of which 
report one thousand copies shall be printed by the State printer for the 
use of the Board. 

Sbc. 3. It shall be the duty of all free libraries on^nized under the 
laws of the State, whether general or special, to make an annual report 
to the Board of Library Commissioners, which report shall conform as 
near as may be reasonable and convenient, as to time and form, to such 
rules as the Board may prescribe. 

Sbc. 4. No member of the Board of Library Commissioners shall 
receive any compensation for his services, except that the Board may 
appoint one of their number to act as secretary, and such secretary may 
receive such sum as shall be agreed upon by the Board, not exceeding 
three hundred dollars annually, for clerical services. The Board shall 
be entitled to expend a snm not to exceed five hundred dollars in any 
one year for supplies and incidentals and for the actual and necessary 
expenses of its members in the discharge of their- duties. The accounts 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBEIARY COMMISSIONERS. 

of the Board shall be audited b; the State Board of Auditors, and paid 
out of the general food. 

Sbc. 6. The Auditor General shall add to and incorporate with the 
State tax for the year eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, and every year 
thereafter the sum of eight handred dollars, to be assessed, levied and 
collected aa other State taxes are assessed, levied and coHected, which 
sum when collected shall be placed to the credit of the general fond to 
reimburse it for the sums authorized to be expended under this act. 

This act is ordered to take immediate effect. 

Approved June 1, 1899. 



APPLICATION FOE REGISTRATION WITH BOARD OP LIBRARY 
COMMISSIONERS. 

APPUCATION FOa RB6ISTRATI0N. 

We, the oflScers and librarian of the Free Public Library of 

incorporated under the law of ,' Act , desire to become 

registered with the State Board of Library Commissioners, and to receive 
the privileges granted registered libraries. 

We agree to comply with the following rules formulated by the Board : 

(1) All registered libraries must be free to the public. 

(2) The library must have a suitable custodian and be placed In a 
room properly provided with book shelves and tables. It must be open 
to the public at least part of two days in the week, 

(3) A township library applying for r^stration must agree to use 
the fines as provided in Article 13, Section 12, Constitution of Michigan, 
exclusively for library purposes. 

(i) A yearly report must be made to the State Board of Library 
Commissioners by the officers of the registered libraries. Blanks for the 
report will be furnished by the Board. 



RULES GOVERNING LOAN OF BOOKS. 

The Board of Library Commisaioners has received your application for 
loan of books under registration plan. Will you please advise us if you 
have complied with the following rules under which the loan is made : 

1. All registered libraries must be free to the public. 

2. The library must have a suitable custodian and be placed in a 
room properly provided with book shelves and tables. It must be 
open to the public at least part of two days in the weelc. 

3. A township library applying for registration must agree to use the 
flues as provided in the Compiled Laws, 1897, Vol. 2, chapter 11, section 
11. 



ACT GOVERNING EXPENDITURE OP LIBRARY MONEYS. 



COMPILED LAWS 1897. 

V. 2, Compiler'B Section 4762. 

Sbc. 4762. The clear proceeds of all fines for any breach of the penal 
laws of this State and for penalties or upon any recognizance in criminal 
proceedings; and all equivalents for exemption from military duty when 
collected in any county and paid into the county treasnry, together with 
all moneys heretofore collected and paid into said treasury on account of 
such fines or equivalents, and not already apportioned, shall be apportioned 
by the county treasurer before the first day of June in each year, amon^ 
the several townships in the county, according to the number of children 
therein, between the ages of five and twenty years, as shown by the state- 
ment of the SuperintendeDt of Public Instruction provided for in the pre- 
ceding section; which money shall be exclusively applied to the support 
of the township and district libraries, and to no other purpose. 

4. A yearly report must be made to the State Board of Library Com- 
missioners by the officers of the registered libraries. Blanks for the 
report will he furnished by the Board. 

5. Lists of books on the shelves of the registered libraries must be 
filed with the State Board of Library Commissioners. This list not to 
include government publications or State documents. 



We hereby certify that we have complied with the above rules. 

Officers. 
Please sign and return to M. C. Spencer. State Library. 

ACT GOVEKNING EXPENDITURE OF LIBRARY MONEYS. 

PUBLIC ACTS 1895. 

Act No. 16, Chap. XI, Sec. 11. 

See. 11. The clear proceeds of all flues for any breach of the penal 
laws of this State and for penalties or upon any recognizance in ci-iiuinal 
proceedings^ and all equivalents for exemption from military duty when 
collected in any county and paid into the county treasury, together with 
all moneys heretofore collected and paid into said treasury on account 
of such flues or equivalents, and not already apportioned, shall be appor- 
tioned by the county treasurer before the flrst day of June in each year, 
among the several townships in the county, according to the number of 
children therein, between the ages of five and twenty years, as shown by 
the statement of the Superintendent of Public Instruction provided for 
in the preceding section ; which money shall be exclusively applied to the 
support of the township and district libraries, and to no other purpose. 

Approved March S, 1895. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



PUBLIC ACTS 1903. 



AN ACT to secure iafortuatiOD regarding all public or school libraries in 
this State. 

The People of the State of Michigan enact; 

Section 1, Hereafter it shall be the duty of the librarian of any and 
all public libraries, including township, school district, village or city 
libraries, to make an annual report regarding the location, condition and 
support of said library to the county commissioner of schools on or before 
tbe thirtieth day of June in each year. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the county commissioner of schools in 
each county, immediately after receiving the reports from the several 
libraries in his county, and before the first day in September of each 
year, to transmit to the Secretary of the State Board of Library Com- 
missioners at Lansing, a complete list of all the libraries other than per- 
sonal libraries within his county, together with the several reports pro- 
vided for in section one of this act, blanks for reports in both instances 
to be furnished by the Board of Library Commissioners. 

Sec, 3. Act nnmber one hundred ninety-two of the Public Acts of 
nineteen hundred one, and all other acts or parts of acts contravening 
ihe provisions of this act are hereby repealed. 

Approved May 21, 1903. 



STATE AIDS TO LIBRARIES. 

There are two plans by which the State is aiding in the organization 
and extension of libraries: 

The traveling library system, which is under the direction of the State 
Librarian ; 

The registration system, which is nnder the control of the Board of 
Library Commisaiouera. 

(1) 

TRAVELING LIBRABIES. 

The traveling library has for its object the introdaction of good books 
into localities where there are no libraries, and where it is difficult to 
procure desirable literature. These libraries are made up in sets of 
fifty volumes, miscellaneous in their character and following in a general 
way the plan of public libraries. From fourteen to fifteen volumes in 
each library are carefully selected fiction, the balance is history, travel, 
biography, ethics, religion and science. These libraries have proved to be 
of the greatest possible help in school work and to the general reader ; 
onder their influence the desire for weak and oftentimes vicious reading 



STATE AIDS TO LIBRARIES. 9 

has been lessened and the demand for pure and vbolesome books in- 
creased. Instances can be cited where the literary taste of the entire 
communit; has been radicall; changed b; the ioflnence of these little 
libraries. These results are shown by the cards, upon which the records 
are kept. The whole plan of the work is essentially educational and has 
for its object the intellectual growth of the readers. The libraries are 
sent from the State Library upon request of various organizations; tas- 
payera can unite in an application (for small villages or towns this form 
is desirable), granges, farmer's clubs, women's clubs, Epworth Leagues, in 
fact any reliable association oi^nized for the purpose of study and im- 
provement, either on general or particular lines; the ''special libraries" 
being largely used by women's clubs. A yearly fee of }5.00 pays the trans- 
portation expenses both ways on four libraries, |1.25 pays transportation 
both ways on one library. While the traveling libraries are not made up 
as school libraries nor sent out as such, they may be placed wherever the 
trastee and local librarian think desirable. They are of most value in com- 
munities where there are no libraries, as they will surely stimulate a 
desire for books, which will result in the organization of local libraries. 
In these collections may be found attractive reading for old and young. 
Further information and applications for the libraries will be furnished 
by the State Librarian, Mrs. M. C. Spencer, Lansing, Mich. 

(2) 

BBOISTBRBD LIBRABIBS. 

These libraries are controlled by the Board of Library Commissioners, 
and are loaned for the purpose of aiding in the organization of new 
libraries, and of strengthening those already established, which may need 
help, by furnishing additional reading. Under this plan any library 
which ie free to the public and which has on its shelves one hundred 
books, not counting government and State documents, may borrow from 
the Board of Library Commissioners one hundred books to be kept for 
six mouths, when upon a further purchase of books another loan will be 
made. The loan applies to township, district and school libraries if free 
to the public. It is hoped that this plan will result in the increase and 
enlargement of libraries in the State, and will convince school and town- 
ship ofBcers of the necessity of using rightly the money provided by law 
for the maintenance of school and town libraries, rather than diverting 
this fund to general school purposes. All moneys collected for penal fines 
should be used for the purchase of books for the town or district libraries, 
and all books purchased should be free to all readers. This was the 
intent of the founders of the State of Michigan. The books are carefully 
selected, the object being to furnish those which will help in an educa- 
tional way and also attract the general reader. Fiction has its propor- 
tional representation, but the intent of the plan is educational. The 
machinery connected with this work is simple, the details easy to under- 
stand. The only expense is the transportation charge, which is paid by 
the borrowers. Full instructions for the care and management of the 
libraries are sent with the books and further information will be fur- 
nished' upon application to the members of the Board of Library Com- 
missioners, or by the Secretary, Mrs. 51. C. Spencer. Lansing, Mich. 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 



Three meetings of the Board of Library ComiiiiHeionei-s were held during 
the jeap 1903. 

March 7, 
September 22. 
December i). 

Jflne 8, Mr. James B. Peter, of Saginaw, and Mr. David E. HeiQenian, 
of Detroit, were appointed as niembers of the Board to succeed Hon. 
Peter White and Mr. J. M. C. Smith. 

At the meeting September 22, Mr. H. N. Loud was elected president 
of the Board. 

At the meeting December 9, Mrs. Mary 0. Spencer waa elected 
secretary. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Ko publicatioQS have been issued by the Board since the last report. 



The following libraries are roistered with the State Board of Library 
Commissioners : 

Ao Sable Public Ubnuy. 

Alden-Cuflter Twp. Diet. No. 6. 

Armods Public Ubrary. 

Bath TowDshlp Library. 

BeidlDg Public Library. 

Beoton Harbor- Hagar Township. 

Bradyriile Public Library. 

Coral Public School Llbrarr. 

Detroit Wayne County Teachers' Library. 

Dnrand Y. t/l. C. A. Library. 

Dundee Township Library. 

Davis School Library. 

Dundee High School Library. 

Eaat Tawaa Free Public Library. 

Eat«n Raplda-Winfleld Public Library. 

East Jordan School Library- 

Edward Bbui^-JefTerson Township Library. 

Frankfort Public School Library, 

Forest Hlll-Plne River Township Library. 

FowIervUle Public School Library. 

Orand Ledge-Onelda Center Library. - . ,, ( ,i^i^a\p 

Hancock T. M. C. A. Library. °'3' " "^ ''' '-"-"-'^"^ 

Harbor Springs Y. M. C. A. Library. 



12 REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSION EEM. 

Hartford Ladles' Libru? Association. 

Hersey School Library, 

Ionia Hall-Fowler Memorial Library, ' 

LlTonla Township Library. 

Mayvllle High School Library. 

Munlslng Public Library, 

MulHken School Library. 

New Boston School Library, 

NaebTTlle Public School Library. 

New Buffalo Public School Library. 

Riley Township Library, 

SpetLker Township Library. 

Sh el byvl He- Martin Township Library. 

Star City School Library. 

Sterling Ledyard Free Library, 

Tecumaeh School Library. 

West Branch Township Library. 

Total number registered 40 

The following libraries have borrowed 100 booka under the registration 
plan : 

Armada. Forest Hill. 

Bath. Fowlerville. 

Beldlng. Harbor Springs. 

Benton Harbor, Ionia Hall-Fowler Library. 

Bradvltle. Mayvllle. 

Coral. Mulllkeo. 

Davis. Nashville, 

Dundee. Shelbyrllle, 

East Jordan Star City.' 

fiast Tawas. Wlnfleld. 

The progress of library growth in the Btate during the past year has 
been very encouraging. The persistent efforts of the Board and the 
hearty response made to these efforts by the county commissioDers of 
schools, together with the generous gifts of Mr. Carnegie hare resulted in 
an awakening, which has greatly encouraged the Commission. The efforts 
of the commissioners of schools and the local officers have resulted in the 
establishment of a number of new township and district libraries, and the 
reorganization of others which have been of little use to the public. The 
statistics, as given in this report, will show a lai^e number of counties 
which have diverted the use of the library money to other purposes. The 
attention of the school officers having been called to this wrongful use of 
the money, it is hoped and expected that a large amount of this 
money will be restored to the use contemplated by the founders of our 
State government. 

At the meeting of the Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs 
held October 13-15, 1903, in Grand Kapids, the following resolution was 
presented and adopted ; 

Resolved, That the Michigan S. F, W, C. co-operate with the State Board ol 
Library Commissioners for the purpose of organizing libraries and extending the 
library interests of the State, also 

Resolved, That the new administration place this work In the hands of the 
Committee on Education or appoint a subcommittee who shall have charge of the 
work and who shall act with the Board of Library Commissioners, detailed plans 
of action to be formulated by the Board and the Committee. i ., ...^i.^ 

L.„. izhi. .;, ^^lOOQlL 



REPOBT OP THE SECRETARY. 13 

Acting nnder this reaolution the president of the federation has ap- 
pointed twelve civib members to act in conjunction with the Board of 
Library Commissioners in the matter of library extension. The follow- 
ing women were appointed and have signified their intention of acting: 

ist Congressional District — Mrs. H. E, Emmons, Detroit. 

2nd CoDgressional District — Mary S, Miller, Adrian. 

3rd Congressional District — Mrs, Gertmde E. Prindle, Charlotte. 

4th Congressional District— Mrs. Ella 8. Custard, Mendon. 

5th Congressional District — Mrs. Phoebe P. Fuller, Ionia. 

6th Congressional District — Mrs. Augusta D, Barnes, Howell. 

7th Congressional District — Mrs. Elsie H. Piatt, Port Huron. 

8th Congressional District — Kate B. Carlisle, Saginaw. 

&th Congressional District — Mrs. G. A. Barstow, Onekama. 
lOth Congressional District — Mrs. M. E. Daglish. Bay City. 
11th Congressional District — Mrs. 0. P. Carver, Traverse City. 
i2th Congressional District — Minnie O. Trempe, Sault 8te. Marie. 

u tbli report, trom the Presldeoi of Che Federated Clubi. whlob 

At a meeting of the Board held December 9, the State was divided by 
Congressional districts, and the following apportionment was made to 
tbe different members : 

Mr. H. N. Loud, Au Sable — Tenth, upper eleventh. 
Mr. H. B. Pattengill, Lansing — Ninth, lower eleventh and twelfth. 
Mr. James B. Peters, Saginaw — Fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth. 
Mr. David E. Heiueman, Detroit — First, second, third and fourth. 

The relationship between the Board of Library Commissioners and the 
federation committee is purely advisory and co-operative, and it is ex- 
pected that large results will follow from the union of these two forces, 
taken in connection with the work which has been and no doubt will be 
done by the county commissioners of schools. It will be seen by this 
plan that tbe whole State will be covered in au intelligent way, and the 
aid which the Board is prepared to give in building up libraries will 
be brought before tbe people in a manner that cannot be misunderstood. 
The great drawback to this educational work, as planned by the State, 
has been the difficulty in getting information before the people, especially 
in remote localities. This difficulty no longer exists and the Board has 
every reason to expect great results from the combination as explained 
above. 

With the regular reports of the county commissioners of schools will 
be found special reports to the members of tbe Board of Library Com- 
missioners, made by request of that body. The attention of those inter- 
ested is called to the showing which is made in these special reports 
relative to the diversion of library funds. 

Tbe notice of the readers is called to the paper by Mr. Peter on 
supplementary reading in connection with school work. 

The report made by Mr. Pattengill of his trip to the Upper Peninsula 
is fall of information, and will be especially interesting to residents of 
that portion of the State. CiOClC 

Through the kindness of those in chai^ of the various librams, which 



14 REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

have been bnilt daring the past year, we have been enablttd to embody in 
this report cuts and descriptionB of the balldings. 

It iB a matter to be regretted that the common council of Detroit has 
refused to accept of the gift of Mr. Carnegie to that city. To none is 
the necessity of library extension more obvious than to the Board as the 
situation there haB been brought before them in the matter of the loan' 
of books from the State. The fact that in the city of Detroit of over 300,- 
000 population there are only five branch libraries is an especially un- 
fortunate condition of affairs in a city which shonld lead the whole 
State in library expansion. It is hoped that some arrangement will be 
made in the near future, by which the outlying districts of Detroit may 
have the privileges which are enjoyed by much smaller municipalities. 

Three of the traveling libraries are now being used in that city, and 
judging from the letters which are received by the secretary, they have 
been most gratefully received and appreciated by the working classeB 
living a long distance from the public library. I quote from a letter re- 
cently received from one of those points: 

"Our club has increased during the past two months and if we could 
have a larger library we would appreciate it very much. During the 
past two months we have been having a course of popular talks npon 
various subjects. I firmly believe the success of our woi^ and these talks 
have resulted from the introduction of the traveling library." 

This library is used by one of the clubs for working boys in the suburbB. 
The facts given in this letter bear witness to the necessity of library 
advance in Detroit. 



REPORT OF KBGI8TEKED LIBRARIES. 
1903. 

ARMADA FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Librarian, Lizzie E. Pomeroy, 

Number of volumes in library, 440. 

Volumes added from January 1, 1903 to January 1. 1904. 235. 

Volumes issued for home use, 3,485. 

Printed catalogue. 

Supported by taxation. 

Governed by library board. 

Names of officers— C. H. Lincoln, George A. True, H. C. Aldrich, C. W. 
Chambcrlin, E. F. Phillips. 

January 26, 1903 — 100 books loaned, circulation 192, number of 
readers 85. 

July 29, 1903— IftO books loaned. 

AU SABLE — HENRY NELSON LOUD PUBLIC LIBBARY. 

Librarian, L. G. Morell. 

Number of volumes in library, 1,13S. 

Volumes added from January 1, 1903, to January 1, 1904, 100. 

Volumes issued for home use, 2,883. 

No catalogue. cignz^d CiOOqIc 

Name of officer — H. N. Loud. " ' ' *^ 



REPORT OF REGISTERED UBRARIES. 



BATH TOWNSHIP LIBBABY. 

Librarian, Bay RobsoD. 
Number of volumes in library, 439. 

Volumee added from January 1, 1903, to January 1, 1904, 113. 
Volnmes issued for home nse, 338. 
No catalogue. 
Supported by flues. 

Governed by board of school inspectors. 

Names of oflflcers — Delia Clise, JameB Costigan, George Tyler. 
October 17, 1902—100 books loaned, circulation 274, number of readers 
79. 
October 2, 1903—50 books loaned. 

B&LOING PUBLIC LIBBARY. 

Librarian, Carrie Wooldridge. 

Number of volumes in librarv, 208. 

Volumes added in 1902 and 1903, 21. 

No Catalogue. 

Supported by fines. 

Governed by board of education. 

Names of officers — Mrs. h. K. Webster, F, H. Hudson, E, N. Pitkin. 

November 12, 1903—100 books loaned. 

BENTON HARBOB — HAOAR TOWNSHIP LAKESmB LIBBABY. 

Librarian, Oscar M. Pratt- 
Number of volumes in library, 190, 
Volumes added in 1003, 25. 
Card catalogue. 
Governed by district board. 

Names of officers — Oscar M. Pratt, Henry Pollard, Flora Curtis. 
August 26, 1903 — 100 books loaned, circulation 190, number of readers 
104. 

BRADYVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Librarian, Josie Brady. 

Number of volumes in library, 100. 

Volumes issued for home use, 52. 

No catalogue. 

Governed by Bradyville school. 

Names of officers — N. Thorson, W. F. Tavlor, Chas. Burke. 

December 18, 1903—100 books loaned. 

CORAL PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Librarian, Albert M. Colgrove. 
Number of volumes in library, 100. 
Card catalogue. 
Supported by school fund. 
Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — Wm. Hill, secretary ; Dr. E. Wm. Bollo, prwident ; 
George B. King, treasurer; S. S. Holcomb, C. E. Tuck. '^■OOglC 
October 28, 1903—50 books loaned. 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



DAT18 SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Librarian, Walter George {P. O. Edwardsburg) . 

Number of volumes io library, 132. 

Volames added from Jaouar; 23, 1003, to January 23, 1904, 30. 

Volumes issued for home use, 46. 

Card catalogue. 

Supported by taxation. 

Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — Charles Hanson, Charles Thatcher, David Tallerday. 

December 23, 1904—100 books loaned. 

DUNDEE PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRABY. 

Librarian, Gnssie Glean, 
Number of volumes in library, 370. 

Volumes added from January, 1903, to January, 1904, 100. 
Volumes issued for home use, 1,000. 
Listed catalogue. 
Supported by taxation. 
Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — Mr, Lafler, Dr. A. B. Unger, C. E. Stanger, E. A. 
Refers. C. W. Pettit. 
November 13, 1903—100 books loaned. 

DUKAND FREK PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Librarian, E. M. l;edyard. 
Number of volumes in library, 216. 
No catalogue. 

Governed by the Y. M. C. A. 

Names of officers — W. F. Bradley, president; H. H. HutchinsoD, vice 
president; L. L. Rush, treasurer. 

EAST JORDAN PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Librarian. J. M. Tice. 

Number of volumes in library, 570 exclusive of State loan. 

Volumes added from September 1, 1903, to January 1, 1904, 395. 

Volumes issued for home use, 1,295. 

Keep written catalogue in blank book. 

Supported by taxation. 

Governed by school district board. 

Names of directors, board of trustees — Wm. E. Malpass, president; M, 
H, Robertson, secretary; L, A. Hoyt. treasurer; W. P. Porter, A, B. 
Nicholas. 

November 27, 1903—100 books loaned. 

EAST TAWAS CIRCULATING LIBRARY, 

Librarian, Mrs. H. T. Thomas. 

Number of volumes in library, 300. -. . 

Volumes added from June. 1903, to January. 1904, 59. ..GoOQIc 
Volumes issued for home use, 1,089. *- 



KEPOKT OF BKGiSTERED LIBKARIES. 11^ 

No catalogue. 

Ooverned by ladies' literary club. 

January 9, 1903 — 100 books loaned, circulation 154. uiinibor of readerK 
32. 

FOREST HIU., FIND SCHOOL. 

Librarian, E. W. Gibeon. 

Number of volumes in library, 38, 

Volumes iasaed for honie use, 10. 

No catalogue. 

Ooverned by school board. 

Names of officers — H. J. White, H. L. Sprague, L. K. Cantteld. 

November 9, 1903—50 books ioaoed. 

FOWLBBVILLB PUBUC SCHOOL LIBBABY. 

Librarian, W. N. Isbell, 
Number of books in library, 691. 
Volumes added from 1903 to 1904, 110. 
Volumes issued for borne use, 155. 
No catalogue. 
Supported by taxation. 
Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — E, W. Burkhardt, president; F. Q. Rounsville, sec- 
retary; F. C. Ellsworth, treasurer. 
December 2, 1903—100 books loaned. 

FRANKFORT PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBBABY. 

Librarian, Miss Jessie Slyfleld. 
Number of volumes in library, 1,635. 

Volumes added from January 1, 1903, to January 1, 1904, 100. 
Card and printed catalogue. 
Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — N. A. Parker, chairman; h. E. Vorce, Edwin E. 
Lobb. 

HARBOR SPRINGS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION LIBRABY. 

Librarian, Etta Carpenter. 

Number of volumes in library, 1,427. 

Volumes added from January, 1903, to January, 1904, 326. 

Volumes issued for home use, 5,390. 

Card catalogue. 

Governed by board of trustees. 

Names of officers — D. B. Gamble, W. J. Clarke. E. Q. Carey, Rpv. 
Heury Neill, Thomas Berry, Dr. David R. Breed. Rev. George K. ICast- 
man. t 

April 4, 1903 — 50 books loaned, circulation 182. No white cards re- 
turned. 

IONIA HALI.-POWLBB MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 

Librarian, Nina Kate Preston. , \ 

Number of v^jiumes in library, 1,600. CiOOQIc 

Volumes added from last of October to December 31, 600. *- 



18 REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Volames issned for home ase from October 10 to December 31, 6,420. 

Card catalogue. 

Supported hj taxation. 

Qovemed \tj board. 

Namee of officers — R. A, Hawley, Fred Cntier, Jr.. 8. A. Chamberlain, 
Ura. O. S. Tower, Mrs. Mattie Bllie, Miss Mary Lovell, Mayor J. F. Bible, 
ex-offlcio. 

September 18, 1903—100 books loaned. 

HATTILLB PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBBABT. 

Librariaa, J. A. Mama. 
Number of rolnmes in library, 325. 
Volninefi isaaed for home nee, 100. 
Written catalogue. 
Qovemed by school board. 

Names of offlcera— W. A. Clark, C. L. Schram, F. A. Kyea, C. B. Brown, 
W. E. BobinBon. 
November 3, 1903—50 books loaned. 

MULLIKBN SCHOOL LIBOABT. • 

Librarian, Sylvia Roundsville. 
Number of volumes in library, 100. 
Supported by taxation. 
Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — Moderator, W. H. Davis; Director; H. Feabody; 
Assessor, Wm. Barbour. 
December 8, 1903—100 books loaned. 

NASHVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Librarian, 8. H. Bennett. 

Number of volumes in library, 274. 

Volumes added from September 1, 1903, to January 1, 1904, 90. 

Volumes issued for home nsft, 4,000. 

Card catalogue. 

Supported partly by taxation and partly by gifts. 

Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — 0. E. Roscoe, H. Dickingson, Wm, Boston. 

May 13, 1903—100 books loaned, circulation 308, number of readers 76. 

January 7. 1904 — 50 books loaned. 

SHELBY VI LLB'H ART! N TOWNSHIP LIBBARY. 

Librarian, J. F. Walstrum. 
Number of volumes in library. 105. 

Volumes added from January 1, 1903, to December 31, 1903, 55. 
Volumes issued for home use, 100. 
No catalogue. 
Supported by taxation. 
Governed by district school board. 

Names of o(Qcers~-J. F. Walstrum, director; E. C. Doxey, treasurer; 
J. J. Williams, moderator. 
January 24, 1903 — 100 books loaned, circulation 2K, nnmber of readers 



REPORTS OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 



STAB CITY SCHOOL LIBBABY. 

Annual report for 1903. 
Librarian, Mary P. Sutherland. 
Nnmber of volames in library, 61. 

Volumes added from September 3, to December 24, 1903, 3. 
No catalogue. 
Qoverued by school board. 

Names of officers — B. H. Blair, director; F. H. May, moderator; Jamea 
Nizott, treasurer. 

November 13, 1903— QO books loaned. 

WINPIBLD PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBBABT. 

ADQual report for 1903. 
Librarian, May B. Chapin. 
Number of rolumeB in library, 138, 
Volumes added in September, 68. 
Volumes ieeued for home use, 52. 
No catalogue. 
Governed by school board. 

Names of officers — E. B. Trefry, director ; C. C. Terry, moderator ; E. 
Morrison, treasurer, 

November 24, 1903—100 books loaned. 



REPOETB OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 

ALLEGAN COUNTY, 

In Q. ThcHpe, Commlssloaer, AllflKan. 

Number of townsblp llbrariea la county 6 

DiBtrlct IlbrarJes 160 

Subacriptlon llbrarlee 4 

ALPENA COUNTY, 

James A. Case, Commissioner, Alpena. 

Nnmber of township Ubrarlea In conntr S 

Number of district Ubrarles 13 

Nnmber of free public libraries 1 

ANTBIH COUNTY. 

H. II. Coldren. CommlsBloner, Bellatre. 

Number of township tlbrartes Id countr 8 

Number of district llbrariea 3 

BABAOA COUNTY. 

Martin J. McKanna, Commlasloner. Baraga. i 

Number of township libraries In county ..V.'.P.Q.'^I^B 

Nnmber ot district Utwaries t 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBEIARY COMMISSIONERS. 



BABRY COUNTY. 

John C. Ketcliam, CommlBBloner, Hastings. 

Number of township libraries In county 3 

Number of district libraries 66 

Number of Bubscrlptlon libraries 1 

SPSCIAL BEPOBT TO THS BOABD. 

In accordance with your request of January 11, 1 hereby submit to yon 
a report of the library situation in Barry couQty, taking up in order 
the Beverat points upon which you desired information. 

LOCATION or LIBRARIES. 

Accompanying this report I send you an outline map of Barry countyr 
showing approximately the location of all the district and township 
libraries. I have designated on the map the districts having no librariea, 
and this will give yon the moat satisfactory information I am able to 
furnish in relation to those localities. 

In this connection I wish to call your attention to the number of 
Tolumes in the district libraries of the county, and the additions thereto 
during the years 1902-1903 : 

Total volumes in district libraries September, 1903. . 6,007 
Total volumes added during 1902-1903 1,213 

The total number of volumes in district libraries, together with 1,165 
in township libraries and 2,300 in city and club libraries makes a grand 
total of d,462 volumes in the libraries of the county. 

DSE OF LIBRARY MONEY. 

Answering your inquiry as to the manner in which the library money 
is used in this county I would say that, the general practice is to use such 
money for general school purposes. This custom has grown up as a 
result of the resolution that may be passed by the township boards per^ 
mitting achool boards to use library money for general school purposes. 
So firmly established has this custom become fixed that school boards do 
divert the library money in some townships where no enabling resolution 
is passed by the township boards. Herewith I hand you a list of the direct- 
ors of schools of the county, showing districts which have diverted the 
library money either with or without the enabling resolution of the town- 
ship board. The districts diverting are designated by a check mark and 
the townships where enabling resolutions were passed by the township 
boards are designated thus (Besolntion). This method of using the 
library money makes it necessary for the district teachers to take npon 
themselves the work of raising money for establishing and maintaining 
libraries. This they do by means of socials, entertainments, etc., and it is 
my observation that most of our district libraries would be small indeed 
were it not for the lively interest taken in them by the teachers. 



i,>L,ooglc 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 



There are three towDship libraries in Barry coiinty,,aa you will note by 
the accompanying map. Barry townehip baa 430 volumes ; Carlton town- 
ship 587 volumes; Orangeville township 138 volnmes. My impression is 
that better reaalta are obtained by dividing the township libraries among 
the districts. 

aiFTS TO LIBRABIBS. 

In February, ld02, the school building at Nashville was destroyed by 
Arc. The fine school library was a total loss. The new school building 
was opened in February, 1903, and the citizens of the town together with 
the school authorities, at once took up the task of establisbiDg a new 
library. About 160 volumes were added before the close of the school 
year. Since September, 1903, 25 books have been presented by some un- 
known friend ; 30 volumes have been purchased by the school board ; 40 
volumes purchased from the proceeds of a music recital, and 60 
volumes from the proceeds of a bazaar held by the ladies of the village at 
Christmas time. 

IN OBNBBAL. 

I look upon the library situation in the county with feelings of mingled 
pride and disappointment. Pride at the good showing made by the 
teachers and pupils in the work of establishing and, enlarging the district 
libraries, and disappointment at the manner in which the library money 
is diverted from its intended purpose by those whose fear of a high tas 
rate is greater than their appreciation of the value of a good district 
library in molding the character of their boys and girls. 

The general library situation in the State and in Barry county par- 
ticularly, would be greatly improved ( lat) if the distribution of the library 
money could be made to those districts only, that have a library, (2nd) 
If the powers of the township board to pass the enabling resolution before 
Inentioned could be restricted to tqicnships having a township library. 

John C. Ketcham, 
Commissioner of SchooU. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
IMrarji etmditwnt in Barry ComOi/. 



Township. 


DUtrict No. 


No. of 
volumea. 


Township. 


DlBtriot No. 


No. of 
volumes. 




Twp. Lib. 
2-fr. 

10 

10 ' 
11 
12 
Twp. Lib. 


167 
63 

12U 

270 
74 

125 
30 
75 

80 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

9 
10 
11 

1 

2 

3 ■ 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

e 

8 
B 
10 

1 
2 

2-tr. 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
Twp. Lib. 

1 
2 
3 








25 
10 




23 
40 
12 
















76 
12 
06 
40 

200 

30 
35 






Johnstown 

Maple Grove 

Orangeville. 

Prairievllle 


80 
46 
25 
10 
64 












55 


45 
















13 
430 

300 






115 
4 








75 
















35 
40 
65 


141 




23 

70 


106 
96 


























27 


25 




40 
60 
36 

687 

76 
75 










44 


Haatiags 


4 




4 

138 




78 
«6 
30 
31 
1,800 
500 




12 

86 

.oot|rc 











REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCflOOLS. 
Libnay condjttons in Barry Ounty.— Concluded. 



Township. 


DiBtrlot No. 


No. of 
volumes. 


Township. 


DUtriot No. 


No. of 
volnmeB. 




5 
7 

8-(r. 
10 

I 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

1 
2 
3 
i 

6 
7 






1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 
B 
8-(r. 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

» 
10 






104 
82 
25 

10 

49 
23 
12 
14 
60 
58 


Yankee Sprinffs. . . 


6 
29 
216 
15 




106 
69 
















23 

35 
200 
31 
56 
40 
4S 
30 




Thornapple 


23 
5 
4 








15 



Note.— The dotted lines Indicate dtetHcts haTing no library. 

BAY COUNTY. 

J. B. Lalng, CommlsBioner, Bay Cltr. 

Nnmber of tovnsblp libraries in county 8 

Number of district libraries 36 

Number of free public libraries 2 

SPECIAL RBPOBT MADE TO BOARD. 

It is my impression that all districts are not using the mont^y for library 
purposes. For some time I have been making inqniriea and find that in 
a few places they have not purchased any library books for several years. 
Of coarse the money may be on<hand, but I cannot tell at present. I in- 
tend to ask the directors to report upon this fnnd before the eod of 
the school year. Will be pleased to give all the information that I have 
or can acquire for the upbuilding of libraries in the rural districts. 

BENZIK COUNTY. 

W. E. D^nee, Commissioner, Honor.. 

Nnmbef of township libraries in county 8 

Number of district libraries 21 

Number o( college or normal school libraries 1 

BRANCH COUNTY. 

James Swain, Commissioner, Coldwater. 

Nnmber of township libraries In county 4 

Number of district libraries 48 

Number tree public libraries 1 

Librarlee In state Institutions 1 



REPORT OF BOARD OP LIPRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



CALHOUN COUNTY. 

Ernest Bum ham. CommiBsIooer. MarBhall. 

Number of townstilp llbrarieB In couDty 3 

Number of district libraries 89 

Number free public libraries 1 

Number aubscrlptiOQ libraries 3 

College or normal school libraries 1 

CABS COUNTY. 

W. H. C. Hale, Commissioner, CasBopalls. 

Number of township libraries In county 3 

Number ol district libraries 43 

Number subBcrlptlon libraries 3 

SPECIAL RBPOET MADE TO BOARD. 

As Dear as I cao ascertain the following is a statemeot of the town- 
ship libraries in Cass county, also the city of Dowagiae : 

MarcetluB, none; Volina, 841 volumes; Wayne, none; Silver Creek, 
none; Pokagon, none; Lagrange, none; Penn, 357; Newberg, none; Porter, 
403; Calvin, none; Jefferson, none; Howard, 350; Milton, none; Ontwa, 
none; Mason, none; Dowagiac city, 1,384. 

Some of the townships which have no libraries, I know, have divided 
up the books among the school districts and have ceased to keep a town- 
ship library. Some of those districts have taken care of the books, and 
have added to them many volumes, other districts have taken no care of 
tbe books and they are nearly all lost, or some school officer has them in 
his home where they are of no use to any one. 

The teachers in some of the schools have held socials and bought books 
and book-cases, and have sacceeded in arousing considerable interest in 
library work. 

Tbe townships which have no libraries vote the library money into the 
school fund. 

There are sixty-two school libraries in the county. Fifty schools have 
no libraries, and there are also six Ladies' Library Associations. The 
list of books for school libraries which was sent out by the State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, will be a great aid in the selection of 
books for libraries. 

CHAKLBVOIX COUNTY. 

A. W. Chew, Commissioner. Bay Shore. 

Number ol township libraries In county 7 

Number of district libraries .''... 10 

CHEBOYGAN COUNTY. 

E. W, Baker, Commissioner, Chebojgan. 

Number of township libraries In county 4 

Number of district libraries 18 



i.vL.OOgle 



REPORTS OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP HCHOOLS. 



CHIPPEWA COUNTY, 

T. R. Basterda]', Commlwiloner, Sault Ste. Marie. 

Number of townsblp libraries In county — 

Number of district Ubrarles 22 

Number of free public libraries 1 

CLABE COUNTY. 

E, G. Welch, CommlBsloner, Clare. 

Number of township libraries in county 3 

Number of district llbrariee 20 

CLINTON COUNTY. 

T. H. Townsend, Commissioner, SL Johns. 

Number of township libraries in county 9 

Number of district libraries GO 

Number of subscription libraries 1 

CRAWFOBO COUNTY. 

J. E. Bradley, Commissioner, Orayling. 

Number of township libraries in county 3 

Number of district libraries ., 6 

DICEINaOM COUNTY. 

E. L. Parmenter, Commissioner, Iron Mountain. 

Number of township libraries in county S 

Number of free public libraries 2 

Number of subscription libraries 1 

SPBCIAL REPORT TO BOARD. 

There are no libraries of any size in the townships and districta. The 
school districts use the library money for library purposes. There ai-e 
five township libraries in the county. A Carnegie library valued at |17,- 
500 has been given to Iron Mountain, and a number of small contribu- 
tions have been made to it. 

BATON COUNTY. 

Joseph L. Wagner. Commissioner, Charlotte. 

Number of township Ubrarles in county 7 

Number of district libraries 107 

Nnmber free public libraries 3 

EMMET COUNTY. 

H. M. Wlntow, Commissioner, Petoskey. 

Number of township libraries in county IS 

Nnmber of district libraries 34 

Number of free public libraries 2 

Number of subscription libraries 2 

* D,3nz.,J.vL.OOglC 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



BFBCIAL KBFOBT TO BOABS. 

We have in Emmet connty twelve towDsIiip libraries and thirty dia- 
trict libraries. The librariee are not given the attention they deserve. 
I think the library money is generally iised for library purposes. This is 
all the information I can give at present, hot I will look after snch inter- 
ests nntil I have a good library in each school. 



^ F. J. Johnson. Commlesloner, Flint. 

Nnmbor of tow&sblp libraries In county I 

'Number of district llbnirieB lOS 

SPECIAL HEPOBT MADE TO BOABO. 

Inclosed find statistics regarding the library situation in Genesee 
connty. I shall be glad to co-operate with your board in any way pos- 
sible to improve conditions. The township of Burton has a library called 
the liSdies' Library, which has, I believe, nearly 1,000 volumes. This is 
the only township library in the connty. 

You will Bee by this report where the trouble largely falls. The money 
is distributed among the districts, but is voted into the general fnnd. 
Cannot this provision be done away with, and also some provision be 
made for a systematic way for selecting books. 

Prom the connty treasurer's oflSce I find that last May, fl,918.15 was 
divided among the townships and the city of Flint for library purposes. 
(The amount for one township is omitted.) 

P. J. Johnson, 
County Commissioner of Schools. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORTS OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 



—Beport of digtriet* as to 



Tommlilp. 




II 
1= 


J 


it 


TowmhlpL 




II 

1= 


i 


ii 


A ttM 


i 

sir. 

,L, 

ntr, 

i 

! 

8It 
I* 

1 

Is 

i 
i„ 

1 

11 fi 
s 

t 

n ti 
11 

1 

BIr. 


to 

""ih' 

H 


ISBI 
12 H 


''is 


niabinr-t^MCif. 


It Ir. 

17 (r. 
S 

!!: 
!"• 

7fr. 
1 (r. 
9fr. 

\'„ 

h. 

1" 
i" 

8 

ll 
is: 

orr. 


so 

1 

4B 
BS 

1 

r, 

BO 


'Vi 

B«l 

H 






>>» 




1 


4T1 

esi 


"ii» 




AUa>i. 












■11 


18 e 

■■■i'ij" 

BOO 


jis 












100 

too 

■ I'm 

M 

BO 
IK 

i 

IB 

St 

m 

s 

■ "i» 


ii 

t M 

on 

'si 
11 

(TO 


"boo' 










IB 78 
7» 


•iS 




arudBlaiKi 






41 

.ii 

4* 

a 


1101 










iS| 


■"Is 






11 40 




8t 


878 

1103 






""on 




















Ui. Monta 


IB 




1186 
















07 
14 




















42 
80 

» 

1 

40 

""Job" 














12i 






It 

100 

M 

IB' 

M 

SI 

% 


11 


!S 




3 SO 




ii 
is 


7 10 


"ii'TB 














ii 






s 


■ii-« 


8«0 


4 «» 



i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
GENESEE COUNTY.— Concluded. 





1 






la 
< 


TowMMp. 


1 


■53 
1- 




ii 


Mundr.-ftm«n'i(. 


10 ir. 

11 Ir. 

li 
I 




tt 32 
«40 

floe 


iiTH* 


TheCtoM- Conl-a 


1 tr. 

err. 

10 tr. 


IK 

19 

1 

71 


tieM 

18 4B 

'si 


"iio'oti 








14* 


ses 


«» 
























Li 

erts 












































Thettom 


35 


ill 

E7 41 

3g» 












Total reoelTed 
Total orpetrfed 










lorUbr 

















■ GOOHBIC COUNTY. 

Luther L. Wright, CotnmiHatoner, Ironwood. 

Number of township IlbrarleH In county S 

Number of district libraries 2 

Number of free public llbmriea , 2 

GRATIOT COUNTS. 

C. F. Pike, Commiaaloner, Ithaca. 
Namber of towuBbip libraries in county. . 



Number of district libraries 120 



SPECIAL RBPOBT TO THE BOABD. 

There are several districts, perhaps eight or ten, that have no libraries 
as yet and I hope to report moat of these with libraries of their own at 
the end of this year, and think it better to urge this than have tbem take 
the circulating libraries. 

Many districts do not get their share of the library money, as the town- 
ship boards vote it away from them. This feature of the law is very 
detrimental to the libraries in these townships and I believe there should 
be no way whatever, in which library money could be used other than in 
the annual purchase of library books before the first of Koremb^ of each 
year. We have no township libraries that I am aware of. 

Alma College library is the only one that has received gifts, other than 
an occasional book. I think the traveling libraries could be used in 
several of the granges of the county. 



HILLSBALB ( 

Charles P. Hulce, Commisfllooer, Hillsdale. 

Number of district libraries Id county 

Number of subscription libraries , 



:;;U8ogle 



REPORTS OF COUKTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 



Town^Ik 


£A 


£» 


TowmlUp: 


dlBtrtot 


■SS- 




S 

L. 

r 

S(r. 
8 

!„^ 

i" 

10 fr! 

a 
I- 

h 

ill; 

IS 

i tr. 

t 

8tr. 






L 

10 Ir 

2tl. 

To 

L. 

!"■ 

h; 
h. 

It 

*lr. 

L 

tr. 

1 
1 














tio 

38 


2ft 








48 
43 

if 






» 






Moscow 


S 

' IS 




S 


44 






















SB 

19 

1 


sr 


Cunbrl*.: 




at 




& 




S 


> 








,?! 






» 
















la 










1 
i 

B» 

M 


IW 

Ta 




St 






1 
















u 




oni^.i- 












s 













I, Google 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 





Naol 
dlaulot. 






No. or 
duuick 


IHtnry. 


S ( 


h. 

I" 
i" 

It Ir. 
11 
1 tr. 






7 ft. 
It 






07 
SO 






IB 


M 


■ 


s 

so 

1 

m 


51 














I4S 

S 

u 

Of 




B 


' 



HOUOHTON COUNTY. 

William Btttta, Commissioner, Houglitoii. 

Number of townsblp libraries In county 1 

Number <rf OUtrlct libraries i 

Number of free public libraries i 

SPECIAL BBPORT TO BOARD. 

The following school districts should have libraries: No. 2, Chassell 
township; No. 4, Adains township; No. 4, Ford Lake township; Laid 
township; Unit. 

There are several other districts which have no libraries, but there are 
few children in those districts. 

Townships which used their library money for school purposes last 
year were Franklin and Osceola. 

We have fonr township libraries in this county, viz.: Duncan, Quincy, 
Schoolcraft and Torch Lake. 

Two very fine buildings have l>een given for library purposes, one at 
Calumet and the other at Painesdale. 



HUBON. COUNTY. 



D. Kaercher. Commissioner, Sebewaing. 

Number of township libraries In county 20 

Number of district libraries 86 



SPECIAL BBPOBT 1 



> THB BOABD. 



I judge that about one-half of the townships in this county have town- 
ship libraries. In several townships the library is broken up into district 
libraries. 

Jo 86 districts out of 115 I have found a school library. These libraries 
have in most instances been put into the schools by the efforts of the 
teachers and the pupils by means of public entertainments. I^e pre^nt 



REPORTS OP COUNTY COMMISSIONBRS OF SCHOOI^. 31 

school offloera in most cases do not know whether a library was ever 
established in the district b; a rote or not. 

In at leaat three-foarths of the districts library money is diverted to 
school porpoBes. 

I shall co-operate with the State Board of Library CommisBioners to 
bring about a better state of afEairs in this county. It will be my special 
aim during this year to interest teachers and school officers and patrons 
in school libraries. I ahall also try to gather reliable statistics. 

INQHAM CODNTX. 
Arthur Wilson, Commfssloaer, Hucn. 

Nnmber at townablp Ubnules la county — 

Number of district libraries ^ 37 

Number of free public llbimries , 7 

BPBCIAL RBPOBT UADH TO BOABD. 

There are school libraries in all the cities and villages in Ingham 
county. The said cities and villages being Lansing, Maaon, Williamston, 
Leslie, Stockbridge, Daneville, Onondaga, OkemoSj Webberville, Holt and 
Haslett. None of these bnt Lansing have a free public library. 

The school districts not having libraries I give by townships: 

Anrelius — District No. H. 
Ataiedon — Districts Nos. 1, 4, 10. 
Delhi— Districts Nos. 2, 4, B, 6, 8. 
Lansing — Districts Nos. 6, 4, 
Leslie— Districts Nos. 2, 2 fr., 3, 4, 7, 9. 
Meridian — Districts Nos, 6, 8, 
Btockbridge — Districts Nob. S, 4, 
White Oak— Districts Nos. 1, 3, 6, 9. 
Williamston — Districts Nos. 3, 5, 9. 

The townBhip boards of a large number of towns certify tbat the library 
money better be used for general school purposes. The law that permits 
this should be executed, i. e. hung, shot or poisoned. Many district boards 
use only a part of library money for library purposes, the rest going into 
the general fund. 

There are no township libraries in Ingham county, and any books 
which might have once constituted socb libraries are lost. I have never 
seen one bearing the stamp of a township library and I have lived in this 
county thirty-flve years. 

Carnegie has donated |35,000 to the city of Lansing for library pn^ 
poses. 

Over |13,000 came into this county from the library fund last year, 
I feel safe In saying not $5,000 of that went into libraries. 

IONIA COONTT. 
M. P. Scott, Commissioner, loala. 

Number of township libraries in county I 

Number of district libraries 97 

Number of free public libraries '^IL 



Nnmber of subscription libraries.. 



i'-r 



BGPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONEE^S. 



SPECIAL RBPOBT MADE TO BOARD. 

Tbe following townships in Ionia count; report that they nse the 
library moneys for general school pnrpoeea: OtiscOj Orleans, Bonald, 
Eeene, Easton, Ionia, Lyons, Berlin, Campbell, Danby. 

Ionia city has the only public library in the county that I know of. 
This library, known as the Hall-Fowler Memorial Library, was given a 
Btone residence building and lot adjoining the court house and there the 
library has its home. Also about 350 books, mostly old books valuable 
for reference or research work, have been given to this library. I do not 
know the value of the baildiog and lot. 

There is only one township library in the connty which is kept intact — 
Portland toinithip. 

Every village and city in the county, Smyrna excepted, has a school 
library. 

Every district in Lyons township has a library. With my present in- 
formation or sources of information, I am not able to give the names of 
the districts or communities that do not have a free library. 

I shall be pleased to answer any further questions, and, while I am 
a new couimissioner, I have the welfare of district school libraries 
at heart and hope to do much to advance or promote their value to the 
people. 

IOSCO COBNTY. 

J. A. Campbell. CommfsBloner, Wblttemore. 

Number of township llbraiiea In county j. S 

Number of district libraries 18 

Nomber free public libraries 1 

IRON COUNTY, 

John F. Mason. Commissioner, Amaaa. 
Number of township libraries in connty 4 

ISABELLA COUNTY. 

H. A. Graham, Commiaeioner, Mt. Pleasant. 

Number of township libraries In countr 10 

Number of district libraries 28 

Number of subscription libraries 1 

College or normal school libraries 1 

SPECIAL BBPORT TO BOARD. 

There ought to be libraries in about 70 school districts in this county. 

The library money must be used for general school purposes in most 
(•ases, as it is seldom used for library purposes. ; 

I do not think over nine townships have libraries worthy of the name. 

No gifts have recently been made to my knowledge. 

The chief bright spot in our library work is the books secured by enter- 
tainments given by the teachers and encouraged by the commissioner. 



i,>L.ooglc 



RBPOBTa OP COUNTY CXJMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOIB. 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

Tbomas H. Sattler, Commlseloaer, Grass Lahe. 

Number of township libraries Id county 1 

Number of district libraries 65 

Number of free public libraries 1 

KALAMAZOO COUNTY, 

Jobn W. Hazard, Commissioner, Kalamazoo. 

Number of township libraries In county 2 

Number of district libraries 90 

Number of free public libraries 2 

Number of subscription libraries 5 

SPECIAL KEPOHT UAUE TO BOARD. 

The reports received at tbis oOitre from school directors and librariana 
show the Dumber of district libraries in Kalauiazoo county to be ninety, 
with an aggregate of 7,37:2 voluiues. The ninety districts are distributed 
among the sixteen townships of the county, each township being repre- 
sented by two or more school libraries. The aggregate number of books 
in district libraries is by townabips, as follows: 

Alamo, 33U; Cooper, 603; Kichland, 241; Ross, 330; Charleston. 351; 
Comstock, 1,621; Kalamazoo, til2; Oshtemo, SSG; Texas, 314; Portage, 
340; Pavilion, 215; Climax, 370; Wakeshma, 278, Brady, 572; School- 
craft, 951 ; Prairie Bonde, 58. 

Only two township libraries are maintained in this county, Schoolcraft 
and Comstock. Both are growing and contain about 1,000 \oliimes. 

In some districts (he library fund hiik been diverted tc general school 
purposes. An effort is' now being made to J'^riect this. I shall ende^'or 
to give you specific informatlou on this point soon. 

In addition to the district and township libraries mentioned above we 
have one public library, Kalamazoo, containing 31,887 volumes. 

The following have also reported : 

I.4Ldie8' Library, Augusta, 1,228 volumes. 

Ladies' Library, Kalamazoo, 2,814 volumes. 

Public Library, Qaleabui^, 632 volumes. 

Fanny Bair Library, Vicksburg, 800 volumes. 

Michigan Female Seminary. Kalamazoo, 4,000 volumes. 

Nazareth Academy, Kalamazoo, 0.000 volumes. 

Lafevre Institnte, Kalamazoo, 1,000 volumes. 

I have not at hand definite information regarding gifts (money, books, 
or buildings), except as to the Fanny Bair Library at Vicksburg. The 
site and fine new library' building belonging now to the Ladies' Library 
Association, Vicksbui^, was the gift of Mrs. Fanny M. Bair, of Vicksbui^. 

I shall be glad to co-operate with you to secure the best possible use of 
library fund in this county. I shall also gladly furnish available and 
needed, information as to conditions of libraries now established at any 
time. 



KALEASKA COUNTY. 

Irene L. Oetty. Commissioner, Kalkosha. 



Number of township libraries In county ^vV^OOj IC 

Number of district librariea T 



..Gooale 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



KENT COUNTY. 
Arthur R. Zlmmer, CommlBsloner, Grand Rapids. 



EBWHIINAW COUNrY. 

p. 0. Decker, Commissioner, Mobawk. 

Number of township libraries in count;. 2 

District libraries 1 

Number of free public libraries 1 

SPECIAL BBPOBT TO THE BOARD. 

According to the Bcbool lospectorB' reporta, all the towDships of tbiB 
cOQDty have township libraries of some description. Most of them, how- 
ever, are small and no new books to speak of have been added for man; 
years. 

Bbennan, Grant and Houghton townships use their library money for 
school purposes. The villages of Oay, Phoenix Mine, Allouez and Mo- 
hawk ought to have better library privileges. The State traveling library 
could be placed in the above villages to advantage. 

LAPEER COUNTY. 

W. Frank L«ugblln, Commissioner, Lapeer. 

Number of townsblp libraries in count; 4 

Number of district libraries / 108 

Number of subscription libraries 3 

Libraries in state institutions 1 

LEELANAU COUNTY, 

J. 0, Duncan, Commissioner, Suttons Bay. 

Number of townsblp libraries in count; '. 10 

Number of district libraries 23 

Number of subscription libraries 1 

LKNAWBB COUNTY. 

M. W. Hensel, Commlaaioner, Bllssfield. 

Number of township libraries in count; 4 

Number ot diatHct libraries 33 

Number of free public libraries 1 

College or normal school libraries 2 

SPECIAL BGPORT MADE TO BOARD. 

In reply to your inquiries relative to libraries I will answer as well as 
I can. 

There are about eighty-five libraries, excluding grange libraries,' in this 
county that contain fifty or more books. These are nearly all public 
school libraries and are scattered all over the country. 

Besides the above there are about sixty, perhaps seventy, districts that 
ba\-e from ten to fifty books. There is not a village school in the county 
of two or more teachers, but has a library of fifty books and upwards. 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 35 

Out o( 196 Bchoo! distpictB in the county there are at least 140 that have 
a library of ten books and upward- These are located in all parts of the 
county. Of coarse many of them are of little value, as they contain books 
that are practically worthies for school children. 

So yoa will see that the localities where there are no libraries are 
also scattered over the county. It would take considerable work to write 
out the location of each of these places. 

In answer to your second question, I think that only about one-half of 
the districts use the library money for that purpose. It is a very difficult 
matter to get definite information on this subject because many school 
officers seem to be unwilling to use the money for the purchase of books, 
or else are (areless about fiie matter, yet report the money as received 
from library fund. 

I believe that in the majority of districts the additions to the librarieB 
are made from the proceeds of entertainments given by the teacher and 
pupils and from prizes received for exhibits at our county fair. The 
County Fair Association allows, in all, about one hundred and fifty dol- 
lars per year for prizes on exhibits at the fair to be given in library books. 
This has been customary for a number of years and has helped a great 
deal to stimulate interest in the school libraries. 

The townships of Adrian, Cambridge, Fairfield, Ogden and Palmyra 
maintain township libraries. In all of these townships except Adrian 
there are one or more districts that maintain a separate library and draw 
a portion of the library funds apportioned to the township. 

Within the last few years Riga and Madison townships have divided 
their township libraries among the respective districts of the township, 
and are much better pleased with the arrangement. 

A number of years ago a man, whose name I do not now recall, pre- 
sented to the village of Ridgway with a building for library purposes, and 
I think he also left an endowment for the library. Full information with 
regard to this could be secured from the librarian of the public library, 
Ridgway. 

The village of Tecumseh has been offered and has voted to accept ten 
tbousaod dollars from Mr. Carn^e for a library. The site has been pur- 
chased and th'e building will be erected next summer. The city of Hud- 
son has been offered the same amount by Mr. Carnegie, but I am not sure 
that it has been accepted, there having been considerable opposition to 
the project there. Ton could secure accurate information in regard to 
this by writing to the mayor or Superintendent G. A. McOee of the public 
schools. 

A few months ago a man by the name of Baker died near the village of 
Clayton, and bequeathed all, or nearly all, of his property to the Adrian 
public library. According to newspaper reports the bequest will amount 
to about fifteen thousand dollars. 

Mr. W. W. Cooke, Clayton, who is executor of the estate, could, I think, 
give YOU more accurate information. 

M. W. Hbnsel, 
Commissioner of Schools. 



LUCE COUNTr, 

William Praklieii, Com ml aal oner, Newberry. 



.^■.oP8^' 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



MACKINAC COUNTr. 

D. H. Strlngbam, CommlaaloDer, S.t- Ignace. 

Number ot townablp libraries fa county G 

Number of district libraries 4 

SPECtAL REPORT MADE BX THE BOARD. 

TowDBliips without libraries — Portage, Hendricks, Brevort, St. Igoace, 
Cedar and Sherwood. 

Townships with town libraries — Newton, Moran, Marquette, BoiB 
Blanc. 

Garfield township had a town library, but it wbb divided up among 
three school districts. Garfield is the only township in the conntv that 
is not organized under the unit system. 

The cities of St. Ignace and Mackinac Island each have school libraries. 

As a general rule library money is not used lov library purposes. 

In my estiniation the town library does not fill the bill in this county- 
on account of distance and roads, the district library to my mind is 
preferable. Tbe best district library in the county is District No. 3, 
Garfield township, £}. H. Rapin, librarian, Rapinville, Mich. This library 
consists of 210 volumes. I do not tfaiok there is a useful town library in 
the county. I doubt very much if anything short of legislation can remedy 
the library situation in this county. 

MANISTEE COUNTY. 

K. J. Lelghtan, CommlBBloaer, Bear Lake. 

Number o( township libraries In county $ 

Number ot district libraries 30 

Number free public libraries 1 

MECOSTA COUNTY. 

E. Keeler, Commissioner, Big Rapids. 

Number of township libraries In county 4 

Number -ot district libraries 68 

Number of tree public libraries 1 

Number of subscription libraries 2 

College or normal school libraries 1 

SPECIAL REPORT MADE TO BOARD. 

From the reports made by the school inspectors and directors it ap- 
pears that not many districts use the library money for library purposes^ 
but divert it to other uses; without examining these reports on file in our 
county clerk's ofllce I cannot now Bay. 

The Phelps library building and books were donated to the city of Big 
Rapids and some other private donations added thereto. 

MENOMINEE COUNTY. 

Jesse Hubbard, Commissioner, Menominee. 



.Co®Qle 

.... iT^ 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCBOOLS. 



MISSAUKEE COCNTY. 

Ezra B. Hall, Commfssioner, LBke City. 

Number of townsblp libraries in county 12 

Number ot district libraries 19 

MONBOB CODNTT. 

A. C. Harrln, CommlBsioner, Monroe. 

Number of townablp Ilbrarlea fn county — 

Number of district libraries 35 

TOumihip Ubranes of Monroe county. 



Name of wwubip. 


"-'s«r" 


No. or 


VoUuhm 


U^""" 


"r'ff- 












































is 


m a (and boolia) 


Noo*. 






M» 




w 




IE 00 

NocWm. 


II5S6 




























1*7 




NottalDs. 


Noni: 












HO 

»0 




Noihlfg. 


■T«0 








WhltefOTd 










Ul 








i 









The above report gives what infonnation I have in my office as to our 
township libraries. 

Whitefopd torwoehip board of school inspectore has voted to use library 
money for general school purposes; the other townships use money for 
libraries — township and school. 

Bedford township divided their township library last year among the 
districts. I believe they did the proper thing. 

Bo far as I know Monroe county has no library or books given by any 
person or persons. Monroe city has a library ; all others are township 
or school. 

We have one hundred thirty-seven districts in the county of which one 
hnndred have established libraries in order to receive library money; a 
few of the one hundred have no books to speak of, while some of the dis- 
tricts which have not established libraries have good libraries obtained 
by giving socials and entertainments. 

If you so desire I can send you the numbers of districts in each town- 
ship that have not established libraries and also the names and addresses 
of school directors io these districts. 



MONTCALM COUNTT. 

Eugene Straight, Commissioner, Stanton, 

Number of township llbrariea In county ■■'•■■){ IQ^f 

Number of dlatrtct Ifbrariee O 

Number of aubecrlptton Ilbmrles 2 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



MONTMOKKNCy COUNTY, 

Samuel Knleel;. Coram iBBloner, Hlllman. 

Number of township libraries In county 1 

Number of district libraries 1 

MUSKEOON CODNTY. 

John O. Reed, Commissioner, Wbitehall. 

Numl>er ot township Ubrartes In county 17 

Number of district libraries 65 

Number ot free public libraries 1 

NEWAYGO COUNTY. 

Ida M. Becker, Commissioner, Fremont. 

Number of township libraries in county 13 

Number of district Ubrariee 77 

OAKLAND COUNTY, 

H. S. Elliott, Commissioner, Oxford. 

Number of township libraries In county. S 

Number of district libraries — 

Number of subscription libraries 2 

OCEANA COUNTY. 

E. W. Fleming, Commissioner, Shelby. 

Number of township libraries in county 16 

Number of district libraries 19 

OOBMAW CODNTY. 

Ben Bennett, Commissioner, West Branch. 

Number of township libraries in county 2 

Number of district libraries IS 

ONTONAOON COUNTY. 

Ella Chamberlain. Commissioner, Ontonagon. 

Number of township libraries In county 1 

Number of district libraries 4 

Number of free public libraries 5 

OBCEOLA COUNTY. 

O. F. Roxburgh, CommlBsloner, Reed City. 

Number of township libraries In county 3 

Number of district libraries 1 

SPECIAL BEPORT TO BOABD. 

I eocloae herewith a pamphlet of school statistics on which I bare 
indicated both townships and districts that hare or have not libraries. 
In the townships where libraries have not been established the 
library fund has been used for general school purposes by the 
direction of the township boards. I have not been able to determine as yet 
whether any districts have misappropriated library money or not, but I 
suspect in some cases they have. Many school district officers seem.,to 
know little or nothing about the establishing of libraries or library funds. 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 39 

I think the same agent whom Mrs. Spencer mentions in the Moderator- 
Topics, succeeded in bamboozling the officers in several of the districts in 
tliiB county. Anyway, a man claiming to represent the Union School 
Furnishing Company, of Chicago, sold libraries to two districts and got 
school orders for the same where the districts hadn't even voted to estab- 
lish libraries, I also found one other district where they bought from 
him, paying |55 for a library that ought not to cost over |20 or f25. 

I hope to get libraries legally established in a good many more districts 
at the next aaoual meeting. 

We have had no gifts for this purpose in Osceola county. 

We have a large number of camps in the northern part of the county 
belonging to the Manistee & Grand Rapids R. R., and I think the post- 
master at Dighten could give you the names of the foremen, etc. 

May I ask a question? For example, in Marion township one district 
has established a library ; can the other districts continue to use a share 
of the library fund for general school purposes, or does it all go to the 
one district until the others have established libraries? This is where 
there is no township library. 

OSCODA COUNTY. 
Sim. J. Lewis, Commissioner, Lewiston. 

Number of township libraries ia county 2 

Number o( district lil)rarieB 7 

OTSBCIO COUNTY. 

R. D. Bailer, GommisslODer, O&rlord. 

Number of townBblp libraries in county 7 

Number of district libraries '. 30 

SFSCIAL BBPOBT MADE TO BOARD, 

I think that the schools in this county use library money very largely 
for general purposes, which is a shame. Townships do the same largely. 
There should be a change in the law, leaving no opportunity for diverting 
library funds from library purposes. 

OTTAWA COUNTY. 
C. E. Kelley, Commissioner, Coopersvllle. 

Number of township libraries in county 10 

Numtwr of district libraries 68 

Number of free public libraries I 

Number of subscription libraries S 

SPECIAL REPORT MADE TO BOARD. 

About one-half of the districts have district libraries. Most of the 
towns have township libraries or fragments thereof. I know of only one 
township library that is divided and transferred from district to district. 
I know of no library that is belpd by gifts of any amount. I cannot tell 
what communities have no access to a free library. 

PRESQUE ISLE COUNTY. 

Edward Erslilne, Commissioner, Rogers. /— ^ -.1 > 

Number of township libraries in county : .S'-QP^'- 

Number of district libraries 3 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



SPECIAL REPORT MADE TO BOARD. 

There are only three echools in the county that have a library, all othera 
are without. The library money is diverted to general school purposes 
as a rale. This county has received no gifts in any form for library 
pnrpoees. 

B08C0MM0S COUNTY. 

E. G. FaTiie. CommlultHier, Roscommon. 

Nnmber of towneblp llbraiieB In coonty 4 

Number of district libraries 3 

SAGINAW COUNTY. 

Jobn C. N&fe, Commlasloner, Saginaw. 

Number of township llbnttiea in county 8 

Number ot dlrtrlct llbmriw 100 

Number of free public libraries 2 

SPECIAL KEPOBT MADE TO BOABD. 

In reply to yonra in r^iard to the matter of libraries in this county 
would say that I have appended hereto a list of the schools in this county 
having libraries and the moneys received in the library fund as reported 
in the anooal report of the director of each district. The township 
libraries are as follows : — 



TowMblp. 


"sr 


Whole No. 


A^. 


B.„„. 


Albea 


NoUWw 


m 


I»73 










m 


«1« 




















M 


at 


aiw 








































tt 


in 


f7 8» 




Premonl 






















M 


no 


«00 






















B.<S1 


1.2M1V 








































104 
















ta I 481 


H20 












!,•» 


an 










• MoneT apent lor Bsaerat poipoMi. 











REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 41 

I have no reports of any township libraries being broken up into dis- 
trict libraries, nor of any gifts of any kind. v 
I tmst that thia is satisfactory. 

ST, CLAIR COUNTY. 

B. T. BlachDey, Conuniseioner, Port Huron. 

Number of township libraries Id count]' 4 

Number ot district llbrari«a 100 

Number of public libraries 1 

Number ot subscription libraries 2 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 

Lewis E. Miller, CommlBsloner, Centervllle. 

Number ot townablp libraries In eauntr 2 

Number of district llbr&rles — 

Number of free public libraries 4 

SANILAC COUNTY. 

Charles O. Putney, Commissioner, Sanilac Center. 

Number ot township libraries tn county 2 

Number of district libraries 3 

Number of subscription libraries 1 

SPECIAL BBPOBT MADE TO BOARD. 

This county contains twenty-six townships. Of the number eleven have 
township libraries. Those having them are as follows: Argyle, Delaware, 
Elk. Elmer, Greenleaf, Marlette, Minden. Speaker, Washington, Wheat- 
land, and Worth. The fifteen not having them are: Austin, Buel, Bridge- 
haiupton, Custer, Evergreen, Plynn, Forester. Fremoot, Lamootte, I^^xing- 
ton. Maple Valley, Marion, Moore, Sanilac, and Watertowo. 

The township boards of Flynn, Fremont, Sanilac, Wfishington and 
Worth voted to use the library money for general school purposes, rather 
than for the nse of a library. I think that the majority of the school 
officers in this county divert the library money to general school uses. If 
you will suggest some way for me to find out, I will do all I can to correct 
the abase. 

I do not know of any township library that is broken up and divided 
into dietrict libraries. 

The village of Lexington has a fine public library, the gift of the Moore 
Estate. 

{Special report of Moore Public Library, Lexington, Mich., to Charles Q. 
Putney. Commiaaioner of Schools.) 

In answer to your request in r^ard to the Moore Public Library, would 
say Mr. Charles Moore's heirs, Mrs. A. E. Sleeper, Mrs. Hnwiey and Mrs. 
Harry Meyer, built, equipped, endowed and presented to the village of 
Lexington, a library in honor of their father, valued at the following: 
Books. 12,000; building and lot, ¥6.000; endowment. 12.500; furniture 
and equipment, |2B0 ; making in all a sum total of H0,750.^iOO^^lC 



42 REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Mrs. Mejere yearly furniBbee one hundred dollars for the purchase of 
books. We have had presented this year by friends and patrons of the 
library one hundred and fifty books as well as a great many magazines. 

Anna E. Henby, 
Librarian. 

SCIIOOLCRAFT COUNTY.' 

Beulab Morseman, CommlsBloner, Monistlque. 

Number of township libraries In county S 

Number of dletrtct libraries 12 

Number of free public libraries 1 

Number of subscription libraries 2 

SHIAWABBEE COUNTX. 

Howard E. Slocum, Commissioner, Corunna. 

Number of township libraries in county 1 

Number of district libraries 84 

Number of subscription libraries 4 

Number of city school libraries 2 

SPECIAL REPORT TO THB BOARD. 

Sciota No. 8, Sciota No. 7, Sciota No. 2, Sciota No. 5, Bennington No. 
6. Shiawassee No. 6, fr., Vernon No. 2, fr., Vernon No, 5, Woodhull No. 1, 
fr., Perry No. 3, Perry No. 7, Antrim No. 6, fr., Antrim No. 8, fr., Burns 
No. 1, Burns No. 10, Rush No. 5, Hazelton No. i, Hazelton No. 9, Middle- 
bury No. 3, Middlebury No. 5, fr., Caledonia No. 2, Venice No. 2, and 
Vernon No. 9, are school districts in Shiawasse county not having 
libraries. 

Money raised for library purposes is so used. 

Hazelton has the only township library in the county which has not 
been broken up into district libraries. 

No gifts of money, books, etc., have been made in Shiawassee connty for 
library purposes. 

TUSCOLA COUNTY. 

Henry P. BuBh, Commissioner, Cairo. 

SPECIAL KEPOBT MADE TO BOABD. 

I do not kBow of one free public library in Tuscola county. I under- 
stand there are several township libraries, but bo far as I have been able 
to learn not one is used. 

Most of the schoolB use the library money for general school purposes. 
However, with the conjperation of the teachers we are bringing about a 
reform in this regard. Quite a number are now using it for library ptir- 
poses, and circulars which you send out ought to reach all our school 
directors. Hence I am sending you a list of the directors. 

A Carnegie library was voted upon in the township of Indianfields. 
Carnegie gave $10,000 and the township voted a one mill tax to support 
the library. 

We have a good many school libraries. They are not on a legal basis, 
however. The teachers bought the hooks by means of entertainments and 
the districts did not vote them. 



REPORTS OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 



VAN BUREN COUNTY, 

E. A. Aeeltlne, Commisaioner, Paw Paw. 

Number of township libraries in count; — 

Number of district libraries 108 

WASHTENAW COUNTY, 

C. B. Foster, Commtaeioner, Ann Arttor. 

Number of township libraries In county 4 

Number of district libraries 11 

Number of subscription libraries 2 



E. W. Yost, Commissioner, Detroit. 

Number of township libraries 1 

Number of district libraries 105 



SPECIAL REPORT UADE TO BOARD. 



According to the directors' census and financial report, which is on file 
in this ofSce, the library conditions in the following towns are as follows : 



HMstramok. . . 



No library moae; used. 



o library money tued. 



44 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COM MISS ION EEtS. 



LivoQla. 

Nti^ldo 

NorthTlUo .. 
FlymmltL... 

KeUfoid 

Romulus. . . . . 

Bumpier . . ■ . 
Vmu Buren . . 



No UbniiT moaej tu 



I uied tor llbtftrr- 
<o UbrsfT money dh 



The Solvay Process Company of Delray gave to the Delray schools, 
which are in Bpringvells township, five hundred dollars worth of books. 
F. B, Sibley, who is a banker in Detroit but has a lai^ farm in district 
Ko. 3 of Monguagon township, donated five hundred dollars to the dis- 
trict for library purposes and the beautifying of the school grounds; 
about half was used for books. I think I do not overestimate if I say 
District No. 3, Monguagon, lias the most beautiful district school building 
in the State of Michigan; a fine architectural design, built of stone and 
brick with slate roof, steam heated, furnished throughout with single 
seats and has four rooms. There are a number of other schools where 



FEDEIUTION OP WOMEN'S CLUBS AND LIBRARY EXTENSION. 46 

small donatioDB have been given and a number of the teachers have pur- 
chased books for their achoolB. 

WEXFORD COUNTY. 

W, H. Faunce, Commissioner, CRdfllac. 

Number of township llbmrtes In county 11 

Number of district libraries 22 

Number of aubaciiptlon libraries 1 



FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS AND LIBRARY EXTENSION. 

To the Federated Clubs of Michigan: 

The State Federation of Women's Clnba will mark the tenth year of 
its history by entering upon a new and very rich field for social service, 
and one which the founders of onr Federation have much desired to 
occupy. 

This work is none other than that of co-operating with the State Board 
of Library Commiasionera. in the establishment of libraries and in extend- 
ing library privileges where now this strong edncational factor is wanting. 

At onr late annual meeting in Grand Rapids in closing her address 
before the convention, Mrs. Spencer offered the following resolution : 

"Resolved, That the Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs co- 
operate with the State Board of Library CommissionerB for the purpose 
of o^anizing libraries and extending the library interests of the State. 

"Remlved, That the new administration place this work in the bands 
of the Committee on Education or appoint a sub-committee who shall liave 
charge of the work, and who shall act with the Board of Library Commis- 
sioners, detailed plane of action to be formulated by the Board and the 
committee." 

In accordance with these resolutions, which were heartily adopted by 
tlie convention this work has now been placed in the hands of the stand- 
ing committee on education, and a sub-committee appointed, composed of 
twelve club women, one from each congressional district of the State as a 
library committee. 

Through the courtesy of the Board of Library Commissioners and under 
their supervision, each member of tbe federation library committee shall 
carry out the details of tbe work in her own district. Her communication 
with the secretary appointed from every club belonging to the federation 
will enable her to secure accurate knowledge of the needs of ber district 
and prepare the way for aggressive library work. 

It is the purpose of the Commissioners, through tbe aid of the women's 
clubs to place Michigan in the front rank of states in the service and the 
use of libraries. 

Now, permit me to urge upon the entire membership of our federation, 
that as tbey themselves use and value books and libraries as means of 
education and culture, so they will from the first enter heartily into this 
new branch of State work. I>et us give to it our best service. We know 
well how widespread among the several State federations, is the interest 
in libraries; and how great is the energy expended in organizing library 



46 REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

movements in order that their educational beDefits may be made to cover 
the widest possible area. 

This opportunity for the federation of Michigao to co-operate with the 
State CommissioB will enable ns to work in a much larger way and more 
effectively than the State federation could hope to do by itself; and the 
whole influence of the movement will be to secure a strong educational 
factor, not alone for "the general advancement of woman," but (or the 
general culture of all communities to which library privileges ahonld be 
supplied. 

Josephine M. Godld, 

President M. 8. F. W. C. 

Owosso, February 1, 1904. 

The work planned for the library committee of the Btate federation of 
clubs is as follows ; 

The member of the library committee representing the federation shall 
confer with the member of the Board of Library Commissioners, whose 
district she represents, on all questions pertaining to the establishment 
of and aid to libraries in the district. 

She shall ask that a library committee be appointed in each federated 
club in her district, one member of which shall be named as library sec- 
retary of the' club, all correspondence relating to library work in the 
locality represented by the club to be carried on by this club secretary. 
This committee shall familiarize itself with conditions in the community 
whether the libraries be township, district or free public, and through its 
secretary shall make a regular report to the member of the federation 
committee. 

The members of the federation library committee shall familiarize them- 
selves with the aid to libraries, which is offered by the State Library and 
the Board of Library Comuiissiouers, and shall Ornish this information 
to the club secretaries. Full information will be furnished by the State 
Librarian, and all circulars and blanks will be sent by that officer when 
requested, tcrthe members of the federation committee or directly to the 
club library secretaries whose names and addresses shall be furnished by 
the federation committee . 

All information and statistics gathered by the members of the federa- 
tion committee will be printed in the annual report made by the Board of 
Library Commissioners to the Governor of the State. 

A large and attractive field of labor is opened to the club women of the 
Btate by this plan. 

The State, through the traveling libraries and registration plan, is offer- 
ing the largest and most generous help in the establishment of libraries. 
If the club women will take hold of the work with the unanimity of pur- 
pose, which has characterized their efforts in the past, there will be no 
doubts as to the ultimate result. 

The above plan is subject to tbe approval of the federation committee 
who will decide for themselves all questions relating to the details of the 

T»'Ork. L.„.,z.i..;>L.OOt^lC 



FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS AND LIBRARY EXTENSION, i^ 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OP WOMEN'S CLUBS. 

-, 1904. 

pluoe and date. 



Name ot club. 



Where located. 



Name of pre^deoi.. 



The following club members have been appointed on the library oommlttee. 



Please fill all lines and r 



Member o( FederaKon Committee 
lor Congresslooal Dlalrtot. 



P. O. Address. 

The above blank is sent by the federation committee to the local dabs. 
After having been properly Bigned so that the names of the local com- 
mittee appear, they are returned to the member ot the federation com- 
mittee. 

MICHIGAN STATE PBDEEATtON OP WOMEN'S CLUBS, 

Report of Librarj/ Committee of 

Name of Club. 



Name ot county 

City, township or Wllase where library Is located 

Name of library 

Free public or school library (free public includes township and district libraries) 

..^..-tCoo'^k 

Number of volumes .S 



4S REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Name of librarian , 

Who selects and purchases tbe books? 

What proportion la flctlon? , 

Describe building in wbtcb library Is kept 

Is it provided with shelving and convenlencee? 

Describe the general appearance of the books 

la the library situated In a manufacturing or farming center? 

1b It a suitable depository for a loan from the State? 

Is the money provided by law for the purchase of books used for that pilrpoee, < 

Is It used for general school purposes? 

(Bee beloio.) 



The above reporta are sent out by the federation committee to the local 
library committee, it beiog for their use in collecting statistics of libraries 
in their locality. These blanks are to be returoed to the member of the 
federation committee, and will finally appear in the report of the Library 



SPECIAL REPORT OF H. R. PATTENGILL. 

H. N. Loud, President, 

State Board of Library Commissionerg: 

Sra — In accord with the vote of the Library Commission I have taken 
time in some of the localities where my regular work bas been to ascertain 
the status of affairs concerning public libraries. Necessarily the work has 
been of a somewhat cursory and disjointed kind, but it has certainly been 
most encouraging to find the sentiment for libraries so universally excel- 
lent, and the awakening so widespread. 

At Coral, in Montcalm county, one of the State traveling libraries was 
exhibited during the evening and the following day sessions of a teach- 
ers' institute held there in October. An explanation of tbe plan was made 
and the pamphlets of information distributed. This particular library 
contained excellent books of late vintage like Newell Dwigbt Hillis's 
"Quest of Happiness," Booker T. Washington's "Character Building" and 
some of the best late fiction, travel, etc. That library was seized by the 
Coral people, and during these long snowbound evenings its cheery and 
inspiring companionship has been doing its gracious work among tbe 
young and old. Many teachers and patrons made inquiries concerning 
the traveling library plan, and doubtless a number of such libraries will 
be found in that part of the State. 

In a trip to the Copper Country I found an excellent state of afifairs 
touching library matters, Calumet has a handsome building, a fine library 
and an enthusiastic, competent and helpful librarian, a combination of 
strong factors for library extension and usefulness. l„ hhi. ;>VliOOQlC 



SPECIAL REPORT OF H. R. PATTENGILL. 49 



Mrs. Grierson, the librarian, and Supt. H. E. Kratz ofthe city schools 
work in harmODj. By means of this co-operation the usefulness of the 
library is greatly extended and a good reading habit formed among the 
young. Owing to the heterogeneous character of the population, the Cain- 
met library contains books in many foreign languages. 

Mrs. Orierson has taken special pains to interest and guide the young 
readers, and a report from that library will show that the number of books 
drawn and the number of patrons are remarkably targe for the population 
of the district and the size of the library. Arrangements are perfecting 
to place class libraries in every room in the schools. 

A division of the library is maintained at Lake Linden, where Superin- 
tendent White and Mrs. White, the principal of the high school, hare 
aided materially in building up a reading sentiment. One of the State 
traveling libraries there is a very popular ally. 

In Painesdale, a mining location a few miles from' Houghton, a fine 
club and library building has been erected through the generosity of Mr. 
Paine, Hon. L. L. Hubbard, former State Geologist of Michigan, and 
general manager of the Copper Range Co., with headquarters at Paiues- 
dale, is an enthusiastic lover of books, and that ample library facilities 
will be provided for that community goes without saying. Superintendent 
Fred Jeffers, of Atlantic Mine' school, in whose district Painesdale is 
Bitnated, has to a greater degree than in any other school of its size suc- 
ceeded in building up a- reading habit among the youth of his school. The 
school library is well selected and in constant use. 

The beautiful high school room at Houghton has its books placed in 
handsome and convenient cases about the school room. No public school 
library building has as yet been provided at Houghton. The ladies have 
a library association there and a fine nucleus for a public library. Some 
wealthy and public spirited person could well immortalize his name by 
providing a library building for that thriving city. 

Sogers, Millerabarg. and Onaway in Presque Isle cotinty are making* 
some progress in establishing school libraries, and the sentiment of the 
citizens most interested in schools is very pronounced for the extension of 
libraries. The library money will be looked after and carefully expended 
for books and supplemented by liberal appropriations. 

In many trips about the State, amid the rural districts and small vil- 
lages I find the people are anxious to learn more about the State traveling 
libraries, and in every place where such libraries have been found in school 
or grange the sentiment is pronounced and enthusiastic in favor of the 
plan. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Hesry R. Pattbngilu 



Di^nz.d by Google 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



THE VALUE OP GENERAL READING AS SUPPLEMENTARY TO 
A TEXT BOOK EDUCATION. 

BT JAMES B. ?£»*£&. 

Knowledge is acquired from but two sources — the experiences of the in- 
dividual and the comnjunicated experieuces of others, the latter usually 
beginning with the text books of school aud college, and, excepting only 
those which are used for working tools, text books are with rare exceptions 
an uninteresting compilation of elementary rules seldom referred to after 
their first use has ceased. When by their use principles, reasons and meth- 
ods have been acquired and a desire aj'oused for greater learning, their mis- 
sion has been accomplished. But in this day of much reading and many 
books, attractive in their freedom from technicalities and alluring in the 
manner in which all subjects are presented, it is difficult to imagine an in- 
dividual whose education has ceased with the shelving,of the text book. 
Such cases may be found, but they are abnormal and usually the result of 
circumstances rather than deliberate choice. 

It is an era of specilization. in which the work of every profession and 
following is subdivided. The professional man, the business man, the 
mechanic, and even the laborer, no longer attempts to cover the entire 
field of his chosen vocation, but each seeks to attain efficiency in his 
special life work and, being proficient in that, rarely aspires to or attains 
eminence in the whole general field. In the rush and haste of modem 
methods, the demand for the accomplishment of so much in so little time, 
the exacting requirements that the best shall be given,. and the necessity 
for constant close study and observation in each special branch, time is 
used and energy exhausted to snch a degree that if it were not for informa- 
tion almost unconsciously absorbed in casual reading, most men would 
be practically ignorant of everything not included in their own lines of 
special work and interest. 

We are living in a world in which nothing remains dormant — progress, 
growth, development are the natural order of things, and it is a dwarfed 
and stunted existence which is content in not trying to have the beat there 
is, and in not trying to obtain the best that life affords. The narrow ex- 
periences of any one life fail to furnish all that is required in achieving 
such results and the wisdom acquired by others, except in the most limited 
degree, comes only from good books. Their influence is broadening and 
helpful and without them one's ability to share in the world's work would 
be greatly lessened and curtailed. No blessing of the twentieth century 
is greater than the facilities of the present day for obtaining them. 

Character and intelligence should be the standards of measurement be- 
tween the citizens of one community and those of another. Those 
possessed of the widest and most generally accurate information, with 
high ideals and noble views of life, are those who fix the standards for 
their fellowmen and who render the best service to the communities in 
which they live. Properly directed power is naefulness, and if knowledge, 
which is power, is acquired from books, and if books can be had for tiie 
asking, then, indeed, no one can plead ignorance and every one must be 



D,„„.db, Google 



UDRAKV OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OP MICHIGAN. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



FLEPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 61 

held acouDtable for not being as wise and as useful in his day and genera- 
tioa as his opportunities will permit. 

Text books are the guide posts on the highways of learning; general 
reading, the fields on either side. In those fields bioom the flowers, ripen 
the fruits and harvests, and lie the treasures which may be gathered and 
used by all who seek them. Given the elementary learning acquired from 
text books, the fields are opened so that he who will ma^' wander therein 
and find such pleasures and rewards as his inclinations dictate and abili- 
ties permit. 

The founders of the great commonwealths and those who gnide their 
destinies have ever realized that the greatest safeguards to the rights of 
humanity, and the sorest means of more firmly establishing and more 
Becnrely perpetuating onr institutions, lie in the intelligence of our citi- 
teas. The first evidence of this was the public school and in the progress 
of time came free text books. Now comes the tender of good books on all 
subjects, practically without money and without price. Suitable to all 
classes and grades of intelligence. And the facilities now given to every 
community, no matter how poor, nor how remote, nor how scattered, make 
ignorance inexcusable. The problem confronting those who have in chai^ 
the distribution of these books is not how to obtain the books, for they 
have them ; not how to send them to places where they are wanted, for that 
can be arranged ; it is how to let the people know what they can have, 
and how to get them to ask in order that they may receive. 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 

THE UNIVEKSITY LIBRABV. 

In 1838 the Board of Regents entrusted to Dr. Asa Gray, who was 
about to visit Europe, a sum of money with which to buy books for the 
University. With this sum he obtained 3,700 volumes which reached Ann 
Arbor in 1840, This was the beginning of the University Library. 

One of Dr. Tappan's first acts on becoming president was to interest the 
citizens of Ann Arbor in this department of the University, with the result 
1^00 volumes were contributed. From this time to 1870 the library grew 
slowly. Not much money could be spared for its increase, and while it 
was the recipient of gifts, some of them very valuable, there were none 
that could be described as large. In 1870 Mr. Philo Parsons of Detroit 
bought and presented to the University the library of Professor Carl 
Heinrich Row of Heidelberg University, who had recently died. This 
collection contained 4,325 volumes and 5,000 pamphlets. In 1877 an ap- 
propriation was made by the Legislature for the library especially, which 
greatly increased its growth and efficiency. 

The present library building, for which the Legislature made an appro- 
priation in 1881, was occupied in December. 1883. The library contained 
at that time 40,000 volumes. Since then few years have passed in which 
the library has not been the recipient of gifts of considerable extent. Of 
this character are the McMillan Shakespeare Library, containing now 
over 5,000 volumes, the Hagerman Historical Collection, the German- 
American Goethe Library, the Morris Philosophical Library, the Alpheaa 



62 REPORT OF BOARD OF UBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Felch Historical Library, the Walter Library of Eomance Literature, the 
Hench Library of German Philology and the Stearns Musical Collection. 
Individuals who have made at different timea especially valuable gifts 
are Mr. C. M. Burton, Mr. D. M. Ferry, Mr. J. E. ScrippB, of Detroit, and 
Mr. 0. M. Barnes of Lansing. 

The general library has two permanent endowment funds of which only 
the income can be used. These are the Pord-Messcr fund of $20,000, and 
the Coyl fund of |10,000. 

The law collection is located in the law building. It has shared in the 
gifts that have fallen to the library in general. Early in its history, in 
1866, it received the law library of Honorable Richard Fletcher of the 
supreme court of Massachusetts. More recently it has received from the 
late Mr. G. H. Buhl of Detroit a collection known as the Buhl Law 
Library, and a bequest of |10,000 to be applied where most needed in the 
development of the library. 

The total of volumes in the general and special libraries was, June 30, 
1903, 174,740 volumes, distributed as follows: 

General library 139,002 

Law library 20,170 

Medical library 12,621 

Homoeopathic library 1,764 

Dental library 1.183 



174,740 

BATTLE CREEK PUBLIC LIBEAKY. 

The lot is 16x20 rods and is valued at |20,000. The building is 101 feet 
long by 67 feet wide. Nine rooms, five on library floor and four on second, 
besides a basement with room for public documents in it. The reference 
room is 40x24 feet, and the children's rpom 24 feet square. Stack room 
is 24x48 feet. ^V'e are not to have open shelves, unless a change is made 
before we are ready to occupy the building. The library is under the con- 
trol of the school board, three of whose members constitute the library 
committee. We have the interest of $10,000 for buying books, which is a 
permanent fund and can be used for no other purpose. The exiienees of 
running the library are paid from the school money. We allow persons 
outside the city limits to use the books upon the payment of two dollars 
per year, but students in the schools can use the library as others, by 
having a card signed by some resident. We give teachers the privilege of 
taking any number of books for reference work on a teacher's card, and 
do not limit the time they can be kept. 

IscA Ambebg, 
Librarian. 

BENTON HABBOa. 

About seven years ago I had seriously intended to build a kindei^arten 
college, but a neighbor on the school board said — "The people will take 
care of that, you had better build a library." I changed my plan and 
willed about $25,000.00 for that purpose, not being able to give the money 
while I live, but Mr. Carnegie's generosity tempted us and we asked him 
for the money. Before this, however, I had given a room in our down 
town comer building for books, and Mayor Brant appointed ^' 
library board, who accepted said room. Last summer the openingbf 



39 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



as 



II 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



PHELPS FREE LIBRARY. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 63 

the aew building gave us a fine borne. For $1.00, township people can 
use buokB, etc., for one year. 

Book stacks, three ; three main rooms in front of book stacks ; youths' 
reading room 15x30 on the left; adults same size on the right; flatiron 
shaped room between them for the public delivery room ; three rooms in 
first floor besides the board room, librarian's, two cloak rooms, etc. In the 
basement that is a ball flatiron shaped in front of resen'ed stacks to hold 
abtfbt 200 or 250 people; three book rooms from curved wall north, one 
in basement, one on main floor and one in gallery directly above the 
others. Shelves are open to the public. 

January 16. 1899, Mayor Edward Brant appointed the following board, 
nearly all serving until August, 1903, viz:— -Geo. F. Sooner, Bev. E. A, 
Hoffman, Rev. Geo. Sablio, Rev. W. Cady, I. W. Riford. A. V. Cady, Capt. 
Pound, Dr. Vatey, W. D. Downey. 

On Jannary 19, 1899, the board organized, elected Geo. F. Sonner presi- 
dent and A. P. Cady, secretary, who have served in the same capacity 
ever since. In September, 1900, the library was opened to the public in 
room eleven, Jones & Sooner block, where it remained until the opening 
of the Carnegie building August 23, 1903. I gave about 100 books and 
appointed a solicitor to ask donations. About 400 volumes were given. 
We began with these and about 125 volumes, government and civil war 
reports. By giving the room and books I started the work, which already 
has a beautiful home, thanks to Carnegie, and about 4,000 volumes, and 
the people are happj', reading on an average over 2,500 books every month. 
The three ministers on the board were very active in helping it along. 
Perhaps eighty per cent of the books read are fiction, more than half used 
by young people, but we have the best as you know by list sent you most 
of which you so kindly recommended. If there is anything more I can do 
for you I will be glad to help all I can. I should say the city gave the 
board about |1.500,00 annually for support, but now *2.000.00, ten per 
cent of $20,000.00 Mr. Carnegie gave us, 

Geo. F. Sonxek, 
President. 

BIG RAPIDS PHEr.PS FREE LIBRARY. 

The library was opened last April (1903) with about 1.600 volumes. 
We now have about 2.100 volumes. The library is open Saturdays only. 
We have a good sized reading room which is open at the same time. The 
size of the lot is 150x150. price probably $1,000. We use three rooms only, 
though there are twelve rooms in the house. We have no reference room 
nor children's, room as yet. The shelves of the library are not open to the 
public, only the librarian and her assistants being permitted behind the 
railing, though the public is allowed in the room where the books are 
placed ; the shelves being around the outside of the room. The privileges of 
the library do not extend to those outside the city limits. Our library, ac- 
cording to the conditions of Mrs. Phelps' wilt must be maintained by the 
city. She gave certain funds for books, two-thirds of which could be 
expended at the first for books and the other one-third placed upon inter- 
est, the income to be used annually for the purchase of Iwoks and can be 
used for no other purpose. Our regular income will permit us to buy only 
about 35 volumes annually, hut we hope for donations which will increase 
the number of volumes quite rapidly. 

W. A. BRio'fas, 
Secretary Library Committee. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



TICESBURO — FANNY M. BAIB LIBRARY. 

The Fanny M. Bair library at Vickeburg, Miehigau, which was dedi- 
cated November 21, 1902, was given to the Ladies' Library Association by 
Mrs. Fanny M, Bair. The pretty building, eitnated on a lot 4x5 rods, is of 
red pressed brick, with white stone facings. It is practically three stories 
high with an octagonal tower forty feet high. It occupies 50x40 feet on 
the ground, and is divided into the following rooms. Assembly, 40x25 
feet; library, 12x16; vestibule, 14x14; committee, 10x13; kitchen. 10x12; 
lavatory, 7x6. The rooms are finished in oak and steel ceilings cover them. 
The light is furnished by electricity. The kitchen has cupboards, sink 
and other appurtenances for preparing and serving meals. A grate with 
an attractive mantel in the assembly room and a large furnace in the 
basement furnishes the heat. New sectional bookcases fill the library 
room, the shelves of which are open only to the seventy-five members. In 
this room is also a handsome mahogany bookcase about fifty years old, 
presented also by the donor of the building. The township library has 
recently rented the committee room for its use. Vicksburg is not only 
proud of this beautiful building, but proud of so public-spirited a bene- 
factor as Mrs. Bair. 

Kate B, Youxg, 
Clerhof the L. L. A. 

BSCAN"ABA CAR.NEQIB PUBLIC LIBRARY, 

A description and a history. In the year 1!)02 the city of Excanaba was 
very fortunate in owning a beautiful corner lot centrally located, measur- 
ing 100x160 feet and valued at |3,000. Still more fortunate when in June 
of the same year. Mr. Andrew Carn^ie made one of his generous off'ers 
of a gift to the city of a library building to cost 120,000, This offer with 
the usual stipulations and requirements from the city was accepted, and 
the beautiful lot so long unoccupied was chosen as the site upon which 
to erect the Carnegie library. In August work ou the building was com- 
menced, and the handsome edifice was completed in April, 1903. 

The building, a very pretty one in the classic style of architecture made 
of red sandstone faces the west, aud has a front exposure of 75 feet 4 
inches, a side elevation of 64 feet 4 inches, the height of the building is 
25 feet, height of dome 34 feet. The front vestibule measures 6x9 feet, 
through which you enter the delivery room located under the dome, the 
size of which is 18x24 feet. On either side of the delivery room is a large 
reading room, each measuring 26 feet 3 inches by 32 feet 10 inches. The 
room on the south side is the children's room, the one on the opposite 
side is the main reading room and reference department combined. 

The stack room to the rear of the delivery room and just back of the 
loan desk is a large one and measures 19x36 feet. This room is equipped 
with the art metal stacks and has at present book capacity for 10.000 
volumes with the possibility of adding another tier of stacks holding the 
same number. The librarian's room at the side of the stack and to the 
north of the building is a pleasant and convenient one the size of which is 
13x19 feet 8 inches. There are doors from this opening into the stack 
aud delivery rooms, also one opening into the side vestibule. X ■OO'^^IC 

The walls of all the rooms are prettily and suitably decorated; tSe waiak 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OP LIBRARY PROGRESS. 55 

and ceilinge were decorated by the associated artists of Milwaukee. The 
woodwork in the library is in oak, the furnishings are also in the poliahed 
oak. The basement, at present unused, extends under the entire building, 
and is divided into roonis corresponding in size to those on the main 
floor. It is possible that one of the large rooms in the basement may soon 
be fitted up by the railroad men for a reading and lecture room, with the 
mechanica) books on the shelves, and the technical and scientific periodi- 
cal literature on the tables ; the furnishing of this room will add to the 
greater utility of the library. 

On furnishing the library it was found that the $30,000 was not suf- 
ficient, and at the request of the building committee, the city received 
another donation of |1,200 which amount was used in the further furnish- 
ing of the library. 

On the first day of May, 1903, there was not a book in the library nor 
was there an old collection of books of any kind to move into new quar- 
ters. The whole work of organizing and equipping the library began in 
May when the present librarian took charge. The first work to he done 
was furnishing the reading rooms with all the best current periodicals, 
magazines, and newspapers, etc. 

Beginning the first of June the library was open every afternoon from 
two until six o'clock, so that the public might have the benefit of the 
reading rooms while the books were being selected, ordered and made 
ready for the shelves. ,\8 the people, especially the children, were clamor- 
ing for Ijooks, as soon as there were two or three hundred volumes on the 
shelves, the board decided that without any public notice the books might 
circulate as they were called for. Acting upon this decision, the 7th day 
of July, 1003, the books circulated for the first time in the city of 
Escanaba from its own public library, and the records for the first day of 
circulation show that only 19 volumes were loaned from the library that 
day. yince then the number has very greatly increased, as the following 
statistics of circulation of books loaned in the months of July. August, 
September. October, and November show. 

Julf. August. Sept. Oct. Not. 

Children 718 1,043 999 1.692 1,896 

Adults 614 1.127 1,332 1,815 1,933 

Total 1,332 2,170 2,331 3,507 3,829 

The circulation of fiction both among the adult and juvenile readers is 
here, as in most libraries, very much in the lead, but the number of books 
taken out in other classes is unusually large. The open shelf system is in 
vogue in this library, and seems to be popular with the patrons. The 
Dewey decimal classification and the card catalogue are also used. Li- 
brary privileges.are extended to those living outside the city limits when 
asked for. Transients are allowed to take books from the library on the 
deposit of one dollar, which is returned to them when the card is returned 
to the library. There is a duplicate rental collection of hooks of the more 
recent and popular fiction, which rent for one cent a day. This is very 
popular among the readers who are desirous of reading the latest hooks. 

The library lot adjoins that of the city high school, so that it makes 
reference work with the students very convenient. There are a number 
of study clubs in the city and the reference department though small aa 
yet. has already been of great advantage to them. The work in this depart- 



56 REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

ment is steadilj growiDg, aa in all other departments and there is no 
donbt that the influence of the library for good is already beginning to tel! 
in the community. 

At present there are 1.750 books in the library, and 504 pnblic docn- 
ments, making a total of 2,354 volumeB in the library. There are 1,457 
readers, with the number constantly increasing, this is a very good per- 
centage of the population. The interest felt by the people is continually 
growing. The future growth and usefulness of the library, the founda- 
tions of which are only just laid is very hopeful, and with a board of 
trustees who are enthusiastic and ambitious to make this library the best 
in the Northern Peninsula the future of the Carnegie public library is 
assured. 

Mab B. Hewitt, 
lAhrarian. 

i PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



The Charlotte public library was established by an ordinance passed by 
the common council, under the State law, on the 29th of November, 1894 ; 
and at the same time, the mayor with the approval of the common council, 
appointed a library board of nine members. 

On the Cth of May, 1895. the council directed that a half mill tax be 
levied on the assessed valuation of all tazable city property for the benefit 
of the library. 

With this sum, amounting to about fl,09»,00, the ground floor of a 
small store in one of the principal business blocks was rented, necessary 
furniture and flxtures secured, a librarian and janitor employed, and a 
library of 9l0 volumes purchased in addition to a loan of 599 volumes from 
the public school library. lu return for this loan, teachers of the public 
schools have the privilege of drawing an unlimited number of books, for 
the use of their pupils, all of which however, must be returned at the close 
of the school year. 

The library was opened to the public on the 18th of January, 1896. 

In 1899 the Charlotte Library Association (which was the pioneer 
library organization of the city I. turned over its books to the city, as a 
loan. Of these 1.678 volumes are now in circulation. The school library 
loan has been inei-eaeed to 8f>2 volumes and with the purchases, which the 
library board has annually made, nearly 0,000 volumes are now on the 
shelves of the public library. These are all classified according to the 
De^ey decimal system, and a printed catalogue has been published. The 
reading room is supplied with 18 periodicals. 

Until recently, the library has been something of a wanderer; not ex- 
actly a dweller in tents, but in various rented buildings. 

In January. 1902. the board appointed a committee to ascertain what 
steps should be taken to obtain a gift from Mr. Carnegie for a library 
building. 

After a brief corre9i)ondence. 3Ir. Carnegie generously consented to 
make a gift of $1 0.000. The gift was afterwards .increased to f 12,000. 

The common council purchased a lot on the corner of Main street and 
Harris avenue, within a block or two of the center of the city, having a 
GO-foot frontage and a depth of 130 feet; price »1.000. 

The library building was begun in the fall of 11102 and was first opened 
to the public on the evening of the 23rd of November. 1903. at which time 
a reception was held, with addresses by the mayor, members of the librarf |C 
board, superintendent of schools, and others. "^ 



CHARLOTTE ITBI-IC UBBARY. 

(Ollt of Andrew Cnrnegle.) 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 67 

Tbe architect of the new building was E. W. Arnold of Battle Creek; 
the contractor, E. E. Linton of the aanie place. 

The dimensionB of the front part are 32x52 feet. The stack room at the 
back, is 24x31 feet. 

The building coasiets of a basement, firat and second stories. The 
foundation walls are' of field stone; above that of dark brown pressed 
brick with red tile roof. The porch entrance is paved with tile and wains- 
coted with marble. From the vestibule, also paved with tile, a stairway 
leads up through the tower to the second story, and another to the front 
basement, the vestibule being separated by glass partitions £ind door from 
the delivery room, which occupies the center of the building. At the left 
of the delivery room is the general reading room, 17x30 feet ; at the right, 
the reference rooms for the librarian's office and the cataloguer. The gen- 
eral reading and reference rooms are practically one with the delivery 
room, being separated by as little wall space as possible, thus giving a 
more spacious effect, and, to the librarian, a general oversight from her 
seat at the delivery connter. 

The stack room is directly back of the delivery room, from which it is 
separated by steel vault doors, and a fire wall extending from the base- 
ment to the roof, thus giving protection from fires which might originate 
in the front part of the building. 

Tbe stacks were furnished by the library bureau, and accommodate 
about 8.000 volumes. Another tier can be added when necessary. With 
its double rows of windows and cream tinted wails, it is one of the best 
lighted rooms in the building. From it a stairway leads to the back 
basement, which also has an outside eulrauce. and is used for unpacking 
and storage purposes. 

There is but one room in the second story, this be.ing used chiefly for 
meetings of the library board. No children's room has yet been provided, 
bnt a large room, 17x30 feet in the front basement can be fitted up for that 
purpose when it is thought best. 

The whole building is heated with hot water, the furnace being located 
in the front basement. 

It is supjdied with both gas and electric tights, and has city water and 
sewer connections. 

The basements are floored with concrete. The delivery and reading 
rooms are finished in sycamore, the ceilings having beams of the same. 

The furnishings consist of a handsomely finished counter in sycamore, 
fitted with drawers and shelves, placed directly in front of the entrance to 
the stack room, and lighted from above by a skylight ; four large circular 
reading tables (each, lighted by a chandelier) and substantial leather 
seated chairs. 

The library has not yet adopted the open shelf system. The privilege of 
drawing books is not extended beyond the city limits, but members of 
clubs, and others from the surrounding neighborhoods often make use of 
tbe hooka for reference work at the library. 

It is hoped that a large purchase of new books will be made in the near 
future and that, with its new building, and improved facilities the library 
may greatly increase its usefulness and give better service to the public 
than ever before. 

S.vRAH N. Williams, 
C"3ii- lAbrarian. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



FLINT PUBLIC LIBBABY. 

We expect to open our library next spring. We have never allowed per- 
BODB outBJde the city limits to draw books. The library committee and the 
remainder of the scbool board, as far as I know, are opposed to open 
shelves ( librariaD in favor of them ) , The present library building and lot 
were exchanged for our new lot without any difference in price. Size of 
our new lot is 82V2Xl32i^ feet. Building is 70 feet each way. There will 
be six rooms for library work. Size of reference room 25x^5 feet. Chil- 
dren'B room a little smaller. Some changes may be made in the plans. 

Lena E. Caikwbll, 
Librarian. 

HOWBLL CARNEGIE LIBBARV. 

The initiative steps for the Carnegie library were taken by the 
Howell Woman's Club. I^etters were written and petitions sent, 
and after a time Mr. Carnegie donated f 10,000 with the usual conditions. 
The terms were accepted and the site donated by McPherson Brothers., 
A library commission was duly selected, the contract let and the build- 
ing begun. It was to have been flniBhed the first of January, 1904, but it 
is not flniBhed yet. 

The style and architecture is rather of the Corinthian order, four Cor- 
inthian columns support the front entrance. The building and the park 
which surrounds it will be a great ornament to the village, as it is situ- 
ated on the main street and only a little over a block from the business 
portion- of the town. 

The ladies' library will turn over their books as soon as the building 
is finished. 

A. Tt. Barnes. 

HUDSON. 

We have purchased our lot for library building at a cost of |2,000.00. 
It is seven rods front by nine and one-half deep. At the present time we 
are getting the plans for our building for which we have flO,000.00 to 
expend, 

BvRON J. Foster, 
Secretary Library Board. 

IONIA — HALL-FOWLEB MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 

The Hall-Fowler Memorial Library Of Ionia was opened to the public 
on the evening of the ninth of October. 1903. The building was the 
gift of Mrs. Marion Hall Fowler. The house was built by Mrs. 
Fowler's father, Mr. Fred Hall, at the close of the civil war. It is built of 
Ionia sandstone and is in a state of excellent preservation. The acre and 
a half of ground surrounding the building will be used for a park. The 
whole property is worth about twenty-flve thousand dollarB. The lot, 
14x16, is worth from ten to fifteen thousand dollars. 

Size of building — Main part, 45xoS feet; wing being used as home of 
janitor, 24x32 feet. 

Reference room — 14x15 feet. 

Children's room — 15x19 feet. dih- d LiOOQlC 

Number of rooms — S. " ' "' o 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



HALL-FOWLER MEMOttlAI 
Ionia. Mich. 



Dignz.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



9 i 

I! 

11 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OP LIBRARY PROGRESS. 69 

Kon-resideata may draw books from the library at a cost of five cents 
per book per week (payable io advance) subject to the same rules, regula- 
tions and fines as govern residents. 

Nina Kate Preston, 
Librarian. 
IRON Mountain — carneoib public librari. 

The present library was a gift of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, In February, 
1900, he gave the board of education of the city f 17,500 for the erection of 
a library building. The stipulation was that one-tenth of this amount 
should be raised annually for the support of the library, that the board 
should furnish the site, and that the library should be open to the public. 
These conditions were complied with, the plans drawn and the contract 
let the summer of 1901, and the building completed and first occupied 
April 15, 1902. 

The library building is located on East Ludington street, one block 
from the main street. It is one-half block from the postofflce and city 
hall and two blocks from the high school. Geographically it is very near 
the center of the town. These considerations induced the board of edu- 
cation to locate It here although the lot is not as wide as was desired. 
The lot, a corner one, has 70 feet frontage to the south and a depth of 120 
feet. It cost J2,500. 

The ^ape of the lot determined in a general way the plan of the build- 
ing. The first prize design for small libraries appearing in March, 1898 
in the Brochure series of Architectural Illustrations was adopted with 
some modifications. On account of the narrowness of the lot one .wing 
was omitted. 

The building is one story high with a high basement. The distributing 
room, 18 feet by 18 feet, is just back of the entry, 12 by 7 feet. To the left 
of the distributing room is the reading and reference room, 
28 feet by 24 feet. The checking desk extends across the 
back end of the distributing room and extends into the corner 
of the reading and reference room. This gives the librarian com- 
mand of the latter room. The other end of the checking desk is made into 
a librarian's work desk. Between the librarian's desk and the checking 
desk is an entry to the stacks. The stack room, 30 feet by 18 feet, is im- 
mediately back of the checking desk. This room is only S feet high so that 
alt volumes can be reached. Immediately above is another stack room, 
with two little study rooms cut off the farther end. The two rooms will 
hold 25,000 volumes. Back of the reading room and 0[>"iing off the stack 
room are two rooms one for the board of education (the library board). 
14 feet by 16 feet, and one for the superintendent of schools, 16 feet by 16 
feet. Entrance to these rooms is also to be had from the street. 

Entrance to the basement is from the front. At the front 
of the stairs is a large corridor. To the left under the reference room is 
the children's reading room, 18 feet by 24 feet and a newspaper room, 24 
feet by 12 feet. Back of the corridor is the supply room and printing 
room (the school does its own printing, including library bulletins) . Back 
of the newspaper room is the heating plant and coal room. A toilet ifl 
located to the left of the entrance to the checking room, and another just 
below this off the basement corridor. 

The building, planned somewhat after the Grecian style of architecture, 
is built of Bedford stone, and carefully finished. On the main floor the 



60 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSION EEIS. 

furniehingB are entirely of natural oak. The entryway. the reference, and 
the dietrihuting rooms have been made eepecially attractive by neat de- 
sigDB in stucco work on the ceilings. The entry is tinted in a dark olive 
shade, the distributing room a Pompeiian red and the reference room a 
light olive green with gilded ceiling. The building is heated with hot 
water and lighted by electricity. 

The control of the library is in the board of education. The superin- 
tendent of Bchoole bas general oversight of the library, while the real 
executive and vital force is the librarian. The board makes the appropria- 
tion part of the school budget. The first year f3,500 was raised for main- 
tenance and books, while the present year $2,760 was appropriated. 
County and city penal flues increase this amount about $300 each year. 

The library contains about 5,300 volumes, all catalogued by the Dewey 
system. Printed and card catalt^ues are both maintained. The shelves 
are open to the public. Checking out books is limited to those living in 
the city. The circulation last year exceeded 20,000 volumes. About forty 
magazines are taken, and bound volumes kept on file. Eight daily and 
weekly newspapers are taken,' and files kept of Chicago, Detroit and local 
papers. 

Miss Margaret McVety has been librarian since December 1, 1001. 

16HPEMING CARNEGIB PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

(Plans prepared by John D. Chubb, Architect, Chicago, Illinois.) 

The building site, 78x90 feet, is located on the southwest corner of 
Main and Barnum streets, with streets on north and east side of site. 
The site, which was purchased by tbe city of Ishpeming cost $4,331.25. 

The size of the building is 77x77 feet which necessitated the placing of 
same as nearly on the street lines as possible; therefore, to give the 
building the appearance of receding from tbe street, the main front en- 
trance is placed about 18 feet back from street walks, being recessed by 
means of an open portico, the outer half being in the form of a prostyle, 
the inner half receding into the building. 

The main entrance opens into a spacious vestibule with Terrazzo marble 
floor from which a broad staircase leads down to basement portion of 
library. Tbe large glass panel doors in vestibule will permit of attendant 
having full view of everybody entering front doors. 

The basement contains newspaper and periodical reading rooms, game 
rooms and toilets, besides an assembly room seating 250, and all neces- 
sary store rooms, work rooms, boiler and fuel rooms and janitor's quar- 
ters. The boiler, fuel, storage and janitor's rooms are arranged along 
north side of basement, which has the least light. The newspaper reading 
room, 18x34 feet, and game room, 14x17 feet, being on the east side, 
thereby receive tbe advantage of light derived from Main street grade. 

A rolling partition between assembly room and newspaper room per- 
mits of enlargement of iissembty room upon special occasions, and by the 
use of sliding doors between newspaper and game rooms, the game room 
can still be used in connection with the library proper. 

Cupboards in game room permit of filing away old newspapers and keep- 
ing games. The men's toilets are located in basement under main vestibule. 

The workroom is arranged on west side of building so as to receive the 
benefit of grade for light, with lift for books; also staircase leading up to 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OP LIBRARY PROGRESS. 61 

main stack room and cupboards for stamping outflts, etc., togetlier with a 
small Inncheon room for employees. Also a private toilet room. 

The assembly room ie arrac^d under stack room. 

The main library floor is arranged with the idea of affording the best 
means of light and convenience to every portion, passing from the main 
vestibule into a spacious octagonal delivery room 18 feet wide, the two 
principal reading rooms upon either side, with the delivery coqnter and 
stack room back of same, immediately facinfr theentrance. 

The general reading room ia 26x46 feet; the children's reading room, 
26x46 feet. There is no reference room, as doors from general reading 
room to stack room permits of adnlts using portions of stack room for 
said purpose. 

The delivery room has spaces arranged for card catalogue tables. The 
delivery counter is large and extends along children's reading room, so 
that they can talk to attendant from reading room. The counter is located 
so that attendant has full view of all reading rooms and stack rooms 
from counter. The ceiling of delivery room has large art glass, circular 
sash with sky-light over. 

The libraridn's oflSce is so arranged as to have complete control over 
children's portion of library. The- ofQce contains fireproof vault, cup- 
boards, etc., and is within easy accessof delivery counter and stair leading 
down to work room; also faas book lift placed convenient to counter and 
librarian's office. 

Turnstiles can be placed on left side of counter to permit of future ac- 
cess for adults to stack room, as stack room at present will not be open 
to the public. 

The stack room is arranged on a one-quarter circle plan. It further pro- 
vides for a rear yard to premises that would not be possible on a square 
stack room, and allows for finishing of exterior of stack room with ordi- 
nary cheaper material, without its being visible from either street. 

A dusting chute is provided in stack room leading down to basement for 
dusting books. The stack room is strictly fireproof and arranged for two 
tiers of stacks to accommodate 30,000 volumes. 

The method of construction and quality of finish are the beat possible 
kind. The entire basement to top of water table is of brown, rock-faced 
sandstone; above the water table the building is faced with gray Norman 
pressed brick and red sandstone trimminga. 

The building finished complete will not exceed Mr. Carnegie's appropria- 
tion, viz., twenty-five thousand dollars. The entire first floor is concrete 
fireproof construction and tile partitions at ends of reading rooms, using 
birch finish stained mahogany throughout reading rooms and delivery 
room and main entrance. Oak borders and cork matting on floors. Bal- 
ance of trim is pine, oil finished. First-class open nickel plated plumbing ; 
combination gas and electric light; steam heat; hard plaster and metal 
lath. The roof is a Sat tar and gravel roof. 

* LANSING PDBLIC SCHOOL LIDRARIf. 

In 1861 an amendment was made to the original charter of the city of 
Lansing, creating a board of education with power to establish a school 
library and appoint an unsalaried librarian. Until 1883, the tax for its 
support was not over $100 per year, LiOOQlC 

In 1882 the Ladies' Library Association of the city donated their beblu 



62 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

and Bold their fornitare to the school library. This swelled the Dumber of 
volumes to about 3,000. 

SooD after this the young men's society gave its fund of nearly $1,600, on 
condition that the public raise an equal amount in five annual payments. 
At this time the library was kept open but three afternoons per week. It ' 
remained in one or two rooms of the high school building until the sum- 
mer of 1897. 

At this time the increasing use of the library made its removal to the 
northeast comer of the first floor of the city hall seem advisable. The 
rapid growth in the library patronage soon made larger quarters im- 
perative. 

During the year 1899-1900, the use of the three southwest corner rooms 
on the same floor of the city hall were granted the library by the city. At 
this time an assistant was hired and the library kept open all dav. 

The usefulness of the library with its growing needs attracted the at- 
tention of some of our citizens to the idea of a Carnegie library building. 

On the ninth of January, 1902, Mr. Carnegie wrote that he would be 
glad to furnish |35,000 for a building on his usual terms. After much 
agitation by interested friends and much discussion in the council, the 
Carnegie library proposition was subftjitted on February 22nd to the vote 
of the taxpayers of the city and carried nearly four to one. 

The question of the site was discussed in the council for some time, 
until it was finally discovered that according to the city charter, the board 
of education alone had jurisdiction over the library. 

On January 12th,1903, President O'Connor appointed a Carnegie library 
building committee of three members from the board of education, under 
whose direction architects were chosen, plans selected, the building com- 
menced, and on the 7th day of November, 1903, the corner stone was laid 
with appropriate ceremonies. 

The new Carnegie library building. 100x74 feet, is being erected on the 
south side of the high school grounds, surrounded by a lot 150 feet east 
and west by 100 feet north and south. It is to be of red pressed brick 
with trimmings of Amherst grey stone. Mr. E, A. Bowd of this city, in 
consultation with Mr. Harvey of Port Huron, is the architect. 

There are to be two stories besides the basement, containing various 
work rooms, boiler rooms, a class room, public toilet rooms and space for 
a stock of 20,000 volumes capacity. The main entrance is reached by a 
flight of stone steps 28 feet wide. The vestibule opens into the main hall, 
17x29 feet. This leads directly into a delivery room 20x30 feet. At the 
left of the delivery room, is the general reading room, 30x32 feet, and back 
of this a reference room, 16x21 feet. At the rear of the delivery room Is 
the stack, IS feet high. At the right hand rear end of the library are the 
librarian's and cataloging rooms and in front of these opposite the general 
readjng room is the children's room, 30x32 feet. The ceilings are 12 feet 
high. There is an entrance on the east side, for the benefit of the high 
school pupils. A staircase at the front of the building leads to tlje second 
story which contains on the left side an auditorium with a capacity of 
seating 160 people, a corridor with space for art exhibits, on the left side 
a club room, with study, cloak and toilet rooms adjoining. 

The building is to be finished in red oak. It is expected that it will be 

D,3nz.<J,>L.OO'^lC 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 68 

completed before tbe end of the present vear, although the severity of the 
present season has caused great delay in the progress of the work. 

Gertbudb Humphbbt, 
Librarian. 

MARQUETTE — THE PETER WHITE PUBLIC LIBKAHY. 

The first effort to establish a free public library in tbe city of Marquette 
was made in 1872, by the Hon. Peter White who donated ten thousand 
dollars, five thousand of which was nsed upon the park cemetery and the 
remainder in founding the Peter White library. 

In 1879 the First National Bank deeded (as purchased by Peter White) 
to the city, the building now known as the old city hall. The second floor 
was fitted np for the use of the library and the few remaining volnmes of 
the district school library were kept on one side of the room and the 
organized Peter White library on the other. The city recorder acted as 
librarian, and with the occasional aid of an assistant, attended to the 
wants of the public on Saturday afternoons. 

These accommodations sufficed for a time but as the city grew it was 
apparent that the room over the recorder's ofSce was neithed a suitable 
nor convenient place for the library, and that to be of value to the city the 
library should be kept open every week day. When the First National 
Bank was rebuilt, Mr. White set apart a portion of the building for the 
library, furnishing and decorating a room at a personal expense of |1,800, 
offered the use of it free of rent if the city would pay for the services of 
a librarian, and keep the library open six days in the week. This the 
council acceded to and both libraries were removed in 1886. 

The district school library under the control of Dr. Geo. J. Northrop 
as school inspector, .was increased to 3.000 volumes. The Peter White 
library contained an equal number of the very best books in literature 
and art, includintc many valuable works of reference. The patronage kept 
increasing and an extra room was thrown open for the accommodation of 
the public and used as a delivery room. 

In 1891 the entire Peter White library was donated to the city by its 
owner and both libraries incorporated by act of the Legislature under its 
present name, The Peter White Public Library. The properties of both 
libraries, the district school library amounting to 13,833, and the original 
Peter White Library amounting to $7,742 were transferred by their re- 
spective holders to the new board. 

When in 1892 it became necessary to seek larger quarters, Mr. White 
donated the Thurber block property, a building which had cost him f35,- 
000. It has been the home of the librarj' for the past twelve years. 

Since the organization of the Peter White Public Library in 1891, there 
have been issued 4,400 library cards. The library has now 14,000 volumes 
and 4.200 pamphlets. Its home circulation last year was 20,198 volumes. 

Under existing rules the public is not admitted to the book room, but a 
change to "open shelves" will be inaugurated in the new building. The 
Dewey system of classification was adopted in 1891, and has proved very 
satisfactory. A dictionary card catalogue was commenced which has 
since been kept up to date, and now contains 50,000 entries. A type- 
written finding list has also been prepared for the convenience of patrons. 

D.jnz.i.-,>L.OOglC 



Gi REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

The library is free for all perBons ovep ten years of age residiDg within 
the city. It is governed by a board of five trustees, appointed by the 
mayor. The city treasurer is the treasurer of the library fund, which is 
secured by a one mill tax on all taxable property of the city. 

Many valuable contributions have been received in the way of books, 
pictures, portraits, flies of magazines, photos of Marquette as it was in 
earlier days, etc. 

A life size marble bust of the Hon, Peter White was presented to the 
library May 24, 1898, as a gift from the' citizens of Marcjuette, in testi- 
mony of their appreciation of the many things Mr. White has done to 
make Marquette the "Queen City of the Upper Peninsula." 

]rfr. Homer Kidder gave the library its second piece of sculpture — a 
bust of Marquette's famous Indian, chief Ko-baw-gam. 

May 18. 1899, was Marquette's fiftieth birthday. For some reason no 
steps were taken to celebrate its semi-centennial. Mr. \\'hite concluded to 
celebrate in his own way and marked the event by donating a check for 
five thousand dollars, towards improving the library building. On August 
3rd of the following year, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Longyear tendered to the 
library board a deed of a handsome lot located at the corner of Front and 
Bidge streets an the summit of Ftont street hill. A very valubale prop- 
erty and ideally located for the erection of a library building. 

Mrs. Peter White supplemented this gift on the same day by a check for 
five thousand dollars towards a new edifice. 

"The following March, Mrs. Longyear increased her original gift for a 
site by two other lots, giving the library trustees a plat 150x190 feet. 
The gift came unsolicited and was a great and welcome surprise. 

The State Tjegislature was asked for a measure giving the trustees of 
the library power to sell or mortgage the present library building for the 
purpose of raising funds to be used in the erection of'a new building, and 
so the good work went on. 

On June 2, 1902, Hon. Nathan M. Kaufman donated the sum of $5,000. 
This was followed within a week by another donation from Hon. Peter 
White of f 5,000. 

The trustees have given the project of erecting a handsome building 
no little consideration, Messrs. Patton and Miller of Chicago, were chosen 
to plan the new library, which is being erected on the site donated, and 
will be ready for occupancy early this summer. 

The Peter White Public Library is a Bedford stone building, two 
stories and basement in height, 100 feet long by 60 feet in depth. The 
total cost including furnishings will be approximately |45,000. 

On the main floor is located the library proper. In the center of the 
front is the main entrance. Passing through a marble vestibule, you enter 
a delivery room, 28 feet by 15 feet 9 inches. To the right is the children's 
reading room, 33 feet 4 inches by 25 feet 6 inches. To the left of the de- 
livery room is the general reading room of the same size. At each side 
of the vestibule, leading from the delivery room, are two stairways, going 
to the second floor and basement. Beyond the delivery room, lies the 
stack room, 50 feet 8 inches by 26 feet. The stacks are arranged in radi- 
ating form, with provision for from 18,000 to 20,000 volumes on each 
level. The stack room ceiling is arranged so that another tier of stacks 
may be put in at some future time. To the right of the stack room and 
opening off of same and also children's reading room, is the librarian's 
and cataloguing room, 15 feet 8 inches by 12 feet 6 inches. To the left 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OP LIBEIARY PROGRESS. 66 

of Stack room and opening off of samCj and also off of general reading 
room is a reference room, 21 feet 10 inches by 12 feet 6 inches. 

On the second floor is an art room, 28 feet by 16 feet 7 inches, a lecture 
room, 3S feet i inches by 25 feet 6 inches, a museum, same size, study, 
21 feet 10 inches by 12 feet 6 inches, and trustees' room, 15 feet 8 inches 
by 12 feet 6 inches. 

In the basement are the toilet rooms, boiler and fuel room, janitor's, 
newspaper reading room, workroom and staff room, and a large room, 
directly under the stack room and of the same size, for the storage of 
soch books as are not frequently consulted. 

MBNOUINBB — SPIES PUBLIC UBEABY. 

Size of lot, 100x200 feet. 

Price Of lot, (4,000. 

DimensioDS of building, 72x74 feet. 

Basement — Lecture room, 28x60 feet 

Stack room, 23x32 feet. 

Class room, 23x32 feet. 

First floor—General reading room, 32x27 feet. 

Alcove, 13x20 feet 

Beterence room, 13x20 feet 

Children's reading room, 23x32 feet. 

Delivery room, 23x25 feet 

Stack room, 23x32 feet. 

Catalogue room, 12x13 feet. 

Librarian's room, 12x13 feet. 

Trustee's room, 12x13 feet. 

Library privileges do not extend outside city. 

IJbrary shelves open to public. 

MT. CLBHBNS PUBLIC UBRABX. 

The public library of Mt. Clemens is still a school district library, and 
up to the year 1902 was without a library organization and was governed 
by members of the school board as were the schools. On the 8th of July, 
1902, a special ordinance was passed by the city of Mt. Clemens creating 
a library commission for the purpose of receiving and disbursing the 
library funds, of whom Mr. George A. Skinner is president, Mr. 8. B. 
BuBsell, secretary, and Mr. R. C. Ullrich, treasurer. The two other mem- 
bers are Mr. Paul Ullrich and Mr. L. T. Cady. This library has already 
leased for fifty years its library building and all property connected 
therewith and management thereof to school district No. 1, of the town- 
ship of Macomb, which includes the City of Mt. Clemens. 

The city paid {5,500 for a site, which is beautifully situated just oppo- 
site tbe high school. It is really ideally situated for a library. Inasmuch 
as the building receives light from three streets. Tbe lot is 80 feet by 
150 feet. The shelves will be open to the public. There are seven rooms: 
General reading room, reference room, childrens room, stack room, lobby, 
librarian's room and cloak room. The basement is to be fitted up for 
public documents, and for a shop for mending books. 

Maboabet C. Uplbobb, 
Liltrarian. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



PAINKSDALB — PAINK MBMOBIAL LIBRARX. 

The Sarah Sargent Paioe Memorial Library building, erected in Painee- 
dale, the "location" of the Champion copper mine, by William A Paine, 
of BoBton, to the memory of his mother, was dedicated on the 14th of 
November, 1903. 

The bnilding, which was designed by A, C. Schweiler of Milwaukee, is 
of red Lake Superior sandstone, and is 85 feet in length, with a maximum 
width of 62 feet. It occupies a very central position, opposite the school 
house on company land that was cleared of the virgin forest to receive it. 
No distinct limits has yet been given to the lot, but it will be large and 
embrace a grove of giant hemlocks, which will serve as a park and play 
ground in summer. The site commands a distant and very beautiful 
view of Keweenaw Bay, 

On the first door of the library building are the main hall, 25x26 feet, 
the delivery room, 26x16 feet, and the stack room, 26x18 fleet. The read- 
ing room to the right of the main entrance, 37 feet 6 inches by 28 feet 
i inches, and to the left the juvenile room, 26x26 feet, and the smiling 
room, 26x18 feet. The second story is given up to an auditorium, 67x37 
feet, a stage and two dressing rooms, while in the basement are public 
baths, a supper room and other unfinished rooms. 

The interior finish of the library is dark oak, the ceilings are beamed. 
The whole building in design and furnishings is satisfying to the most 
exacting and is sure to imbue the community with ideas of refinement 
and taste. 

On the southwest wall of the reading room, opposite the entrance to it, 
hangs a life sized portrait of the good woman, to whose cherished memory 
the building was erected. Hers is a face so full of character, of alert 
intelligence and kindliness that it seems to shed a personal and very 
living infiuence upon the building and upon all who come there. 

At the time of the dedication of the building the number of books con- 
stituting the library was 457. These represented private donations. 
Since November other gifts of books have been added, making the total 
number to date 752. The shelves are open to the public every day except 
Sunday, from 3 to 6, and 7 to S. Each borrower is entitled to two cards, 
for fiction and non-fiction (we expect soon to add a periodical card). 
Our charging system was borrowed from the Calumet & Hecla library. 
Residents of Painesdale, Trimountain and Baltic (three contiguous loca- 
tions) including children in the fourth grade or above, are entitled to the 
full privileges of the library, it being Mr. Paine's wish that all employees 
or residents at the mines that constitute the Copper Range Cousolidated 
Co., of which he is president, should share equally the advantages of the 
library. 

The library is maintained by an appropriation from the Champion 
Copper Company, and by the rentals from the auditorium in the building. 
As the appropriation is necessarily small, the mine not being as yet on 
a dividend paying basis, the money for new books has to be raised by en- 
tertainments. This will make our growth seem slow, but we trust, none 
the less sure. 

Our reading room is supplied with four daily newspapers, one of which 
is Finqish, six weeklies and seventeen monthlies. Our juvenilefropm oon^ 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



r 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 67 

tains the children's magazines and papers and picture books for the very 
little folks. 

Our staff consists of one librarian (not trained) and one janitor. The 
administratioQ is in the hands of a local board of managers, whose actions 
are subject to the approval of' the board of trustees appointed by Mr. 
Paine, and includes besides himself, L. L. Hubbard, general manager of 
the Champion Copper Co., and F. W. Denton, general manager of the 
Trimountain-Baltic mines. 

We want to enlarge our sphere of usefulness, especially in ways that 
can be done by voluntary effort, and we shall be glad of help and sug- 
gestions from those who have trodden the same path before us. 

Charlotte Hubbabo Goodell, 
Chairman Board of Managers. 

PORT HURON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The Port Huron public library is an outgrowth of the old school library. 
In 1895 a board of library commissioners was appointed. The board con- 
sisted of three member^ at first but was soon increased to five. They 
procured quarters for a library, an old church building being somewhat 
remodelled for the purpose, and the school library was made into a public 
library. At the time of the change the library numbered a little over 
2,000 volumes, and it has grown to over 11,000 at the present time. 

The need of a new library building was strongly felt, and a grant of 
$40,000 was obtained from Andrew Carnegie. An additional grant of 
$5,000 was obtained later to allow for some improvement in the plans. 
The library buildiuK ie now in process of construction, and we expect to 
move into it next May. The site was a small park and was donated by the 
city. It measures 175 by 250 feet. The building is 70 by 105 feet. There 
are 22 rooms, the reference room being 22 by 16 feet and the children's 
room 30 by 40 feet. 

Our shelves are open to the public with the exception of fiction, and 
that restriction will be removed in our new building. It existed here only 
on account of our cramped quarters. The privilege of using books does 
not extend beyond the city limits. We have a very good collection of 
German books, which h'aa been donated for the most part by Mr. Charles 
Baer, a citizen of Port Huron. We have a good reference collection and a 
very good history collection. We have a lai^ number of pictures result- 
ing from the proceeds of a lecture course given several years ago. As this 
is a depository library we get all the government publications, and we 
also get the State publications of Michigan. 

The library is in charge of a librarian aud one assistant and is governed 
by the board of library commissioners. 

Alta Btanbbubt, 

lAbrariatt. 

ST. JOSEPH public LIBRABT. 

The library is only in the process of construction and we will be unable 
to enter it until next June, 

It ie a gift of Mr. Carnegie and cost $12^00. The lot cost $2,350. The 
building is some BO feet square, the rear being circular. On the main 
floor there is a delivery room, stack room, reading room, children's read- 



88 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

ing room and librarian'a room; below there is ft small anflitnrinm, direct- 
or's room, bindery, and the fnel rooms. The hnildinR is a small one and 
the rooms are small; the delivery room will not be much larger than 15 
feet square. The children's room and the reading room will be about 
the same size, 18x27, with merely a counter between them and the delivery 
and stack rooms. 

It has not yet been decided whether the use of the library will be ex- 
tended to persons living beyond the city limits, but T have no doubt that 
these people will have that privilege when the time comes, The shelves of 
the library will be open to the public. It is proposed that the auditorium 
will be used by the librarian in lecturing to the children of the public 
schools hoping thereby to cultivate a taste for good literature. 

Lawrsmcb C. Ptfh, 
President. 

TECUMSBH FRBX PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Education and literature have always bad many admirers and sup- 
porters in Tecumseh. Its public schools have ever had liberal support- 
In 1883 public spirited ladies and gentlemen organiKed the Ladies' Library 
Association and for twelve years under many discouragements main- 
tained the same, collecting nearly 2.000 boohs and enfflclent furniture to 
comfortably conduct a circulating library. In 1895 the ladies association 
proposed to the district that it wonld give its books and furniture to the 
school district if the latter would promise to maintain a free public library 
and reading room in the village as a part of the district's educational 
system. At the annual school meeting of that year the district on those 
terms assumed control of Tecamseh's public library. 

In 1902 the board of education wrote a letter to Mr. Andrew Carnegie 
of New York, setting forth the fact of having a library that was well 
patronized and asking him to consider Tecumseh as a city desiring his 
ronniflcence in the form of a library building. After some delay and cor- 
respondence he promised to give f8,000 on his usual terms in regard to 
pledge for maintenance. The district at once obligated itself, and im- 
mediately began preparations by purchasing as desirable a Iot*as could 
be found in the village. The location of the library building in many 
towns has provoked controversy and bitterness, bnt in Tecumseh only 
good feeling and satisfaction followed the selection of a site. Mr. Olaire 
Allen of Jackson was selected architect and Mr. Joseph H. Smith of 
Tecumseh, was made superintendent of construction. Before the designs 
for the building were completed it was found that such a building' as the 
board desired could not he erected for the $8,000 that Mr. Carnegie had 
promised, and again the board appealed to him, and again he was willing 
to help on the same terms as before, terms which the district was bat too 
glad to accept- so that now flO.OOO is available for the construction of 
the building. The building is to be of red pressed brick with light stone 
trimmings and tile roof- one and a half stories high, on an ample comer 
lot Bii by eleven rods in size in the best residence district. To say that 
the people of Tecumseh are greatly pleased is telling less than the whole 
truth. 

The following figures may be of interest and will give a more definite 
idea of what the stmctnre Is to be. The main floor will be divided into 
six rooms as follows: 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



S 

£ t 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY PROGRESS. 68 

Stack room, 16x26 feet. 

DeUvery room, 12x20 feet 

Librariao's room, 9x12 feet. 

Reference room, 12x13 feet. 

Children's room, 16x20 feet. 

Heading room, 16x20 feet. 

In the basement there will be five rooms of the following dimenBiona: 

Lecture room, 23x33 feet. 

Parlor, 12x13 feet. 

Hall, 13x17 feet. 

Furnace room, 15x17 feet. 

Coal room, 12x12 feet. 

Ontaide dimensions of building, 40x57 feet. 

The school dietrict includes more than six square miles, and within its 
boundaries all resideots are entitled to the free use of the library and 
reading room. People living outside the limits of the district are per- 
mitted the use of tbe same by the payment of moderate annual tax. Tbe 
shelves of the library are not at the present open to the public, but the 
matter of "open shelves" is under advisement. The lecture room and 
parlor in the basement are designed for the use of ladies' clubs and other 
meetings of a purely literary character. At present the library has 4,000 
bound books and tbe stack room is planned on a basis of 10,000 volumes. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



ox 1. 1 
7\lS 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



GEWEBALMBl" 
UNIV. OH MiCH. 
AUG S II 905 



STATE BOARD 



ilBRARy COMMISSIONERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOB THE YEAR ENDING DKCEMUER 5\, \'^0' 



LAN'SINC. MICHIGAN 
.^pVWKOOP HaLLENU1£CK CRAWFORD CO., STATE PHiNTERS 



,.db, Google 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1904. 



LANSING, MICHIGAN' 
WYNKOOP HALLENBECK CRAWFORD CO., STATE FKINTERS 

1905 



s ijle 



D,„„.db, Google 



An Sable, Michigan, March 3, 1005. 
To Hon. Aakon T. Bliss, 

Goverttor of Michigan: 
8iB— I have the hooor to submit the report of the State Board of 
Library CommissioDers for the year 1904, 

Very respet-t fully, 

Henry Nelson Loub, 

President. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.d'b, Google 



REPORT OP THE SECRETARY OP THE BOARD OP LIBRARY 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Two nieerings of the Board of Library CommiBsioiierB were beld during 
the year 1904, February 24th and September 2nd. 

Since the passage of (he law providing for the registration of libraries 
with the State Board of Librifi-y Commissionere the following named 
libraries have availed themselves of that privilege: 

Alden, Custer Twp^ Dist. No. 6. 

AldenCuster Twp., Dist. No. 6. 

Armada Public Library. 

Au Sable Public Library. 

Bath Township Library. 

Bay Port, Fairhaven Twp,, Dist. No. 2. 

Belding Public Library. 

Belleville Free Public Library. 

Benton Harbor, Hagar Township Library. 

Berlin, Tallmadge Twp., Dist. No. 8. 

Bradyville Public Library. 

Coloma Public School Library. 

Coral Public School Library. 

Crosweli High School Library. 

Davis School Library. 

Decken-ille High School Library. 

Detroit, Wayne County Teachers' Library. 

Dundee High School Library. 

Dundee Township Library. , 

Durand Y, M. C. A. Library. 

East Jordan School Library. 

East Tawas Free Public Library. 

Eaton Rapids, Winfield Public Library. 

Edwardsburg, .Jefferson Township Library. 

Forest Hill, Pine River Township Library. 

Fowlenille Public School Tjhrary. 

Frankfort I'ublic School Library. 

Gowen. Stontcalm Twp.. Dist. No. 1. 

Gmnd Ledge. Oneida Center Library. 

Hancock Y. M. C. A. Library. 

Harbor Springs Y". M. V. A. Library. 

Hartford Ladies' Library Association. 

Hcrsey School Library. . GoOqIc 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISStONBRS. 

Ionia Hall-Fowler Memorial Library. 
Ionia, Ronald Twp., Dist. No. 6. 
Lakeview Public Library. 
Lawrence Townsbip Library. 
Livonia Township Library- 
Martin Twp., Dist. No. 5. 
Mayville ttigh School Library. 
Merrill, Joneerille Twp., Dist. No. 4. 
Muir High School Library. 
Mulliken t^cliool Library. 
Muui»iDg Public Library. 
Naabville Public School Library. 
New Boston School Library. 
New Huffalo I'nblic School Library. 
North Star Library. * 

Pickford Public Library. 
Pierson SobooJ Library. * 

Pigeon, Wisner Dist. No, 4. 
Potterville Free Public Library. 
Reese Rchool Library. 
Riley Township Library. 
St. Joseph, Hollywood Library. 
Shelbyville, Martin Township Library. 
Speaker Township Library. 
Star City School Library. 
Sterling. Ledyard Free Library. 
Stevenson Public School Library. 
Tawas City Library. 
Teruinseh School Library. 
Wakefield Township School Library. 
Walker Township, Dist. No. 6. 
M'est Branch Township Library. 

LTiider the registration plan there have been loaned by the Board 100 
books to each of the following libraries: 

Armada. Hancock. 

Bath. Harbor Springs. 

Belding. Ionia Hall-Fowler Library. 

Benton Harbor. I^awrence. 

Berlin. Martin Township. 

Brady ville. Mayville, 

Coral. Mulliken. 

Davis. Nashville. 

Detroit. New Boston, 

Dundee. New Buffalo. 

Duraiid. Oneida. 

East Jordan. Pirkford. 

East Tawas. Shelbyville. 

Edwardaburg. Star City. 

Forest Hill. Sterling. 

Fowlerville. Wakefield. (^i^,^n\t^ 

Frankfort. Winfleld. ^'^''""^ "> '^''-"Jg"^ 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COHMISSIONEOtS. 



it 









LI. 



2|il 



1 1 ii m 
* iiiii jjiii 






JlsJI 



illl 






i ss ;l» s :S5i I ;ss| 



g :r; -n 3S igs 



S :S SS8S3 28*8 



SSSE5 ggSSJ siaSI S^SS! I|S2 



jyji |iyj| :U|1 f 

4li':i liifi lii:* 11* =i fjl: 

iJ^Sl 1i|"is *WS1 si^iS OJ^ 

■eE3£s£ (2££zs SJJxv. x£s#S e=^«! 



v Google 



S REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

The growth of library sentiment in this State, and the increased deBire 
on the part of emaller towns and villages to establish libraries is exceed- 
ingly gratifying to the Board. This sentiment shows itself in different 
ways, especially in the Remand on the State Library fop loan of books 
and in the many letters received by the Secretary of the Board asking 
for advice and aid in tbe establishment of new libraries, and for sugges- 
tions as to the purchase of books. The active support of the county 
commissioners of schools and state federations of women's clubs has 
resulted in increased activity along library lines, and still greater results 
are looked for in the near future. Reports from the county commis- 
sioners, and also from the library committee of the State Federation of 
Women's Clnba will be found in this report, giving in detail the statistics 
of fhe condition of free public libraries in this State so far as it has 
been possible to collect them. Especial attention is called to the statistics 
Bbowing tbe use which has been made of the library moneys apportioned 
to the districts and townships for the purchase of books. The diversion 
of these funds from librarj- to general school purposes has worked 
a great wrong to tbe school children of the State, and a careful exam- 
ination of these tables by the count;v commissioners and by all interested 
in the extension of libraries is respectfully requested by the Board. 

NOTES FROM THE STATE. 

The following libraries have been given by Mr. Carnegie since the last 
report: Adrian, Albion. Ann Arbor. Cadillac. Dowagiac. Flint, Howell, 
Hudson. Jackson, Ludin^ou. Manistee,. Mt. Clemens, Negaunee, Niles, 
Port Huron, Poseyville, Sault Ste, Marie, Tecumseh, Three Rivers, 
Traverse City. ' 

The following cities have received bequests from residents of Michigan: 

Battle Creek — Willard bequest. 

Fenton — A, J, Phillips bequested office and fSOO. 

Grand Haven — Webster Bacbellor bequested |10,000. 

Kalamazoo College— Bequest of 800 books by Mr. Todd. 

Kalamazoo Labor Unions will establish a free public library. 

Korthville — Mary E. Lapham library. 

Vassar — Given by Mrs. F. A, Bullard. 



Tbe city may lose the library bequest made by A'mos M. Daker, as 
r^evi Daker has begun suit to set aside tbe will of his brother, Amos M, 
Daker, who left his property to the city to found a public library. The 
estate consists mainly of a $12,000 farm in Dover, and the brother and 
only heir contends that Adrian cannot hold property outside its corporate 
limits. 

ALLEGAN. 

The public librarj- has received the following valuable gifts ; 

Oliver & Co., bookcase. 

Baker & Co., combination bookcase with secretary. 

David Cornwall, eight pictures of American authors, framed. 

S. D. Pond, clock. 

W. H. Biila, 114 volumes official history of the War of the B^^^^|(? 



REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY C0MMIS3I0NBRS. 



From small beginning the Alma College Library has grown to promi- 
nence. It now haa 20,000 volumeB to which the pablic as well as the 
students h^ve access. 

The growth of the library haa been astonishing. The first books to be 
contributed, which formed a nucleus to the library, were a set of Ency- 
clopedia Britannica, given by Bev. D. M. Cooper of Detroit, and 880 
volumes on religion, education and literature, given by Rev. James G. 
Inglis of Bay City. From that time there has been a steady stream of 
money, books and pamphlets until it has grown to a magnificent library, 
ranking with those of the older and larger institutions of the State. 

The following are some of the important libraries included. The 
Potlasky law library of 782 volumes, the Lucy Plum-Mitchell library of 
history and political economy, the Arthur Hill library of Lincolniana, 
and the Sarah H. Lancashire library. 

The library has always t)een the favorite place for public benefactions. 
It haa been through the munificence of such generous friends as A. W. 
Wright, who has contributed more to the making of the library than any 
other person, that sucli a library has been possible. So far this year 
there has been received from A. M. Marshall of Duluth, Minnesota, $50 
for new books; for binding periodicals from A. W. Wright, |50, and for 
current periodicals for the ensuing year from John W, S. Pierson of 
Stanton, $150. One of the finest gifts that ever has been received came 
from Charles Stinchfield of Detroit. It is the "Boydell Gallery of Shake* 
peare." 

ANN AHBOR. 

Mr. Carnegie has added $10,000 to his gift 1o this city, thus making hi» 
gift $30,000. 

ARMADA. 

The public library at Armada is a fair specimen of what can be accom- 
plished in a small town. In April, 1001. the voters at town meeting 
agreed to levy a quarter mill tax tor lilirary purposes, and four months 
later the library was o(>eued with 81 liooks besides 100 volumes loaned 
by the Slate. In two years the number increased to 336 and now reaches 
nearly 1.000, A reading room is maintained where current periodicals 
are filed. The library is open two days in a week. 

BEACON HI1.L, HOUGHTON COUNTY. 

The people of Beacon Hill are to have the advantage of a library in 
their own town, n privilesje accorded but few towns of the size. One 
of the traveling libraries loaned by the State has arrived for the new 
library. The first set of books consists of 50 which will be kept at the 
library for a time, and will then be exchanged for another set. 

The library is in tlie Beacon -Hill-Freda school house and H. E. 
Ericflon, the principal of the school is the librarian. The library will 
he open for the distribution of books on every Tuesday and Thursday 
and the benefits of the library are 6pen to all residents of the three 
locations of Edgemere, Beacon Hill and Freda. 

Although the library starts as a branch of the Michigan traveling 



10 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONBRS. 

libraries, it is not the iateution of the promoters to remain as a part 
of that organization. The Tainesdale library has an interest in it 
and it is the iutention to have all the books for the local library pro- 
vided from Painesdnle in time. In fact the library here is a branch 
of the Paioesdale Memorial library and will be fully establiehed as 
such ns soon as possible. 

BENTON HARBOR, 

Andrew- Carnegie, the donor of the Benton Harbor library building, 
has sent the library a copy of Hugo Grotius' immortal work, "The 
Rights of War and Peace, or the Jmvt of Nature and of Xations." The 
library board passed a resolution thanking Mr. Carnegie for the gift. 

\i. Hoyt of Eau Claite. owner of a large and valuable collection 
of Indian and other i-elics, has offered the same to the Carnegie library 
of this city. A committee consisting of Pi-esident Sonner and Dr. H. 
Y. Totten. appointed by the library bojird. visited Eau Claire and ex- 
amined the collection. Dr. Totten says it is the finest private collec- 
tion in the T;nited States. It is the purpose of the board to establish a 
museum of curios, and the gift of Mr. Hoyt will be a most excellent 
beginning. 

BIRMINGHAM. 

A movement is on foot here to secure a public library a peti- 
tion to that effect being circulated by Miss. M. Baldwin, one of the 
directors of the Ladies' Library association of this village. The asso- 
ciation will donate a site and some 2,5U0 volumes in case a new public 
library is built here. Andrew (Carnegie will be asked to help in the 
work. The tax payers are to see that it is properly maintained after its 
erection. i 

FLI.IT. 

The heirs of the estate of Alexander I>. McCoU have presented 68 
volumes to the i>ublic library. These include books of travel, history, 
poetry, theologj-, biography, the People's Cyclopaedia in two volumes, 
and a few standard novels. Among these is a flue edition of Dickens' 
works. 

GRAND HAVEN. 

City Clerk Glerum was notified by the probate court of Chicago that 
the will of the late Webster Uachellor. which has been filed there, be- 
queaths ?10,yOO to Grand Haven for library purposes. 



A large number of very valuable books, etc.. have been received as 
gifts at the Ryerson library, among them being an old and very valuable 
map of Kent countv presented bv !<imon Kaat. The map was printed in 

Hon. .John Patton. Pi-esident of the library commission has signified 
his intention to establish a traveling library for the aged. The library 
he established as a memorial for his little son, Philip Sidney, bas 

D,3nz.,J.vL.OOglC 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 11 

rnrried brightness and cheer into the lives of many children the past 
reiir, aud the mit«sion of the library for the aged will be the same 
for tho^e who have passed beyond the age of activity. 



Among the recent notable donations to the college library, upon 
the dolieitatiou of Trustee Ambler, is that of Mr. William W. Cook of 
New York City, who pi-eferred ihat the college authorities make se- 
lections best suited to their needs, and verv gcnerouslv sent his check 
for *10(). 

HO\YELL. 

The Andrew Carnegie Library building in Howell has been quite at 
a standstill since its abandonment by the builder, A. G. Kriehule. The 
library comiaission have placed the condition of affairs before Mr. Car- 
negie, and have secured another donation from him, of $5,000 to aid in 
the completion of the building. 

KAL.\MAZOO. 

A library for the labor unions of Kalamazoo is to be established by 
the Trades and Labor Council. The library will consist of books, mag- 
azines and pafiers in which questions of industrial organization and prog- 
ress, and matters pertaining to social and economic reform are dis- 
cussed. 

Through the generosity of the Hon. A. M. Todd of this city the 
reference library of Kalamazoo College has received a valuable addi- 
tion of 800 volumes of literature, history aud other books of reference. 

LUDIKGl'ON. 

Plans for the new Carnegie library have been accepted, and the build- 
iug will be commenced at once. 



The Northern Normal School has received through the generosity of 
Messrs. Peter White. N. M. Kaufman and E. N. Breitung the Moses 
Coit Tyler library of 4,000 volumes. 



The construction work on the public library given by Mr. Spies is 
now progressing with a rush and the indications are that the dedica- 
tion will take place in the early spring. 



The Manual Training School for the Blind at Saginaw will include 
a circulating libniry for the use of all blind i)efBons in the Stated 

The University department of engineering has a mechanical library 
in its own building. i OOQIC 



12 REPOBT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

W. C. McMillan hae contributed $100 to tlie University, to be used 
for the benefit of tbe McMillan Shakespeare librar;. 

MiLFonn. 

A meeting preliminary to the organization of a library has been 
held in Milford, and it is hoped that a tax for the support of the li- 
brary will be voted at the spring election. 



MT. CLEMENS. 



The new Carnegie library which bas been in the course of construc- 
tion for the past year and a half is now completed, and the books 
have been moved from the old building. The facilities for use of the 
books and the library furnishings are of tbe best. 



October 15, 1904, the llackley library celebrated its 14tb anniver- 
sary, the library being the gift of Mr, Chas, H. Hackley who bas pre- 
sented the library with tlie following valuable books: The History of 
North America. 20 volumes. ¥1.50(1: the Steven's Facsimilies of Manu- 
script in European archives, $2,500; Voltaire's complete works, 42 vol- 
umes; "Hinkley" bible, 14 volumes. 

NILES. 

The Kiles Public Library was dedicated Xov. 19, 1904. 

ONTONAGON. 

A woman's library association has been organized in this town and 
an effort is being made to secure as many names as possible. 

POHT HURON. 

The public librar.v given by Andrew Carnegie to the city rf Port 
Huron, was dedicated Mav 20, 1904. 



The business men's association of St, Johns has under consideration 
a public library. 

ST, JOSKPH. 

The new library given by Andrew Carnegie was opened to the public 
on the 11th of November, 1901. Miss Fife, the librarian, is a graduate 
of the library department of the Illinois University. 

S.^ULT STE MARIE. 

The Carnegie library will be fonnaHy opened early in January. 
Through the generosity of Judge Jos. 11. Steere, R. D. Perry, Geo. 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CHJBS. 13 

Kemp and former CongreBsmun Henry W. Seymour, the library will 
open fully equipped with the most approved furniture. 

^ SOUTH PAHK. 

The auDouncement that a traveling library would be establiahed io 
this section has met with general approval by nearly every resident. 
E. E. Vahey, who will act as temporary librarian, stated that the 
endorsement of ^5 taz)>nyera was required before the library could 
be established. Mr. Vahey has made no personal canvass to secure 
this number, but is hopeful of having a complete list shortly. 

TECUM SBH. 

The new Carnegie library will be dedicated Friday, Feb. 10,1905. 

THBEB BIVERS. 

The Three Rivers Free Public library has recently moved into their 
beautiful new building, for which Mr. Carnegie gave |12,600. The 
Hon. W. J. Willets donated the lot upon which it stands, valued at 
$2,500. This library of about 10,000 volumes, baa received special 
commendation at the hands of some of the officials of the State asso- 
ciation as being unusually complete and well conducted for a city 
of this size. Senator E. B. Linsle.v of the sixth district ia president, 
and has been at the head of the enterprise since its organization, some 
20 years ago. 

PONTIAC. 

Mr. Carnegie has offered |i:U,000 to Pontiac for a library building 
subject to the usual conditions. 



STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUiJS LIBRARY COMMIT- 
TEE. 



In order that there might be a clearer understanding of the work 
to be done by the Litirai-y ('omiiiittee of the State Federation of Women's 
Clubs and the Board of Library Commissioners, the secretary of the 
board was instructed to invito the members of that committee to meet 
with the Itoard at Bay City, October 11th, this being the date of the an- 
nual meeting of the State Federation of Women's Clubs. Pursuant to 
thes^ instructions rooms were opened by the secretary at the Frazer 
House, who placed there on exhibition one of the regular traveling 
libraries, which are circulating in the State, and also one of the special 
libraries, showing the books which are sent out to women's clubs and 
other organizations for study purposes. There was also exhibited a 
number of the Brann pliotographs of ancient and modem artjkhich 



14 'REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

are beiog loaoed by the t^tate. With one exception the entire library 
committee was present and plans for library extension were thorou^ly 
discuBsed. The result of this meeting has been most satisfactory, as the 
matters connected with the work wei'e thoroughly explained and plans 
for the year deflnitely outlined. It is contemplated bV the board to call 
another joint meeting, which will be held in Kalama7x>o at the time 
of the annual meeting of the State Federation. 

A detailed account of the Bay City meeting is given below. Follow- 
ing this meeting reports were made by the members of the Federation 
Committee, these have been included in this report. 



BBPORT OP THE JOINT MEETING OF THE BOARD OP I-IBRABY COMMISSIONERS 
AND THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE OF THE STATE FEDERATION 

OF women's CLVBS. 

The secretary of the Board of Library Commissioners addressed the 
committee, giving a brief history of the work done by the Board, and 
then discussed the work which it was hoped could be accomplished 
through the mutual efforts of the Federation and the Board. Mr. Loud 
explained the apportionment of the State Library moneys and read 
statistics, giving the counties and the moneys received by each and the 
number of books, purchased, showing that the larger part of the money 
had been used for general school purposes. Mr. Loud stated that many 
districts made no reports as to the number of children in their districts. 
Out of 1,200 districts 641 failed to report and consequently did not 
receive the money to which they were entitled. A general discussion then 
followed and the traveling library and registration systems were ex- 
plained, blanks distributed and pictures examined. A question box was 
asked for the next morning. 

The meeting then adjourned until 9 o'clock a. m. October 12th, 

October 12, 9 o'clock a. m. 

At this meeting Mrs. Spencer explained in detail how the townships 
and districts could obtain the flue money for library purposes. 

Reports were read by the members of the Federation committee. 

After the reports were read and discussed the question box was opened 
and the secretary read the questions and answered them. In answering 
these questions a large number of miuor details connected with the work 
was made plain. 



Dig,, z.d by Google . 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OP WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



REPORT OF CHAIKMAX. 



BEPORT OF MRS BI.LA 8. CUSTARD, CHAIRMAN OP FEDBRATION COMlllTTEE. 

Id the resolutiona passed at the ninth annnal meeting at Grand Rapida 
we pledged to "co-operate with the State Board of Library Commissioners 
for the purpose of organizing libraries and extending the library interests 
of the State." 

The new administration placed the work in charge of a committee. This 
committee, known as the "Federation Library Committee," asked for the 
appointment of persons in each club to carry on the work in that locality. 
The appointments were made and the needs ascertained last year. 

The laws of our State, found under Public Acts from 1835 to 1903, 
provide for the establishing and maintenance of libraries, A city, vil- 
lage, township or school district may have a library if the people so will. 
The State Board of Commissioners and State Librarian are ready to 
assist. The State aids with the Traveling Library System, Registration 
System and Special Club Libraries. I#t us as club members and co- 
workers translate these laws and aids into victorious action by carrying 
the stored up product of master thinkers to the awakening minds, even 
if. like the Japanese, we carry a library on our (club) shoulders to the 
doors of the people. 

This call to become knowledge bearers is not a fad, the result of a 
passing fancy, but the desire to meet a great need, the spreading of 
knowledge in the needy portions of our State that Jhe intellectual value 
of its citizens be increased. 

There are many townships in our State without libraries, counties 
where there is not a good district school library these schools ought to 
have library aid, for a school without a library is like a language with- 
out a literature. 

Therefore let us resolve to place a traveling library, assist in forming 
a free public library or aid a registered library wherever an opportunity 
presents itself. 

Illinois club women are asking their I.iegi8lature for laws favoring 
library extension. We have the laws, and ours is the work of helping 
to make these laws operative and to solidify this great educational work, 
which is one of the institutions of our State government. Teach the 
people to use what the law provides. Look over the list of Michigan 
traveling libraries, note the helpful books for schools, farmers' clubs, 
neighborhoods, individuals, and then determine to do personal work for 
library extension by placing higher thought within the reach of all. 

Library extension furnishes work for every ciuli in the Federation. 
Let us not be indifferent to the work that appeals to the higher nature. 
Take the list, go into a district school, talk about the beauties and truths 
found in those books, and vou will have vour reward. 

ELLA F. CUSTARD. 
Chairman Librarj^ Compiittee. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



KEPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE OF THE STATE FEDERA- 
TION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



FIR8T DISTKICT. 

Mrs. H. E. Emmous, Detroit, resigned. No report. 

SECOND DIBTIBICT. 

MiB8 Mary S. Miller, Adrian. Report. 

Library cominittee« have been appointed by thirteen clubs out of the 
twenty-one in luy district, the 2nd Congressional. 

Number of libraries fnlly reported on blanks sent out 11 

Total number of volumes in above libraries 287,023 

Amouat of fiction varies from less than 1-12 to % entire number of 
volumes. 

Condition of books, fair to good. 

Libraries housed in buildings of their own 5 

Libraries located in school or college buildings 4 

Libraries housed in rented buildings 2 

Libraries located in college towns 5 

Libraries located in manufacturing centers 4 

Libraries located in farming centers 2 

Libraries suitable for loans from the State Library 6 

In all these libraries money appropriated for purchase of books is 
used exclusively for the same. 
CInbs using traveling libraries and picture collections 2 

Have found one town, Morenci, without a public library, nor sentiment 
in favor of one, although the people are an unusually well educated and 
cultivated class. 

Have received a letter from Manchester telling of two small libra- 
ries there, the school library consisting of 40(» volumes, niostly books of 
history, reference and biography, and the township library containing 
CSO volumes, a good collection but not conveniently arranged, nor 
in systematic order. 

I find the clnbs in smaller places, are, as a rule, more interested in 
library work and respond more promptly than in the cities, the latter 
seeming to feel that there is no work for them to do when there is a good 
library already established in their own town. 

Local library committees were appointed by the following clubs in the 
Second district: 

Jackson County: 

Amaranth Club — Mrs. Mary Cahill, Chairman; Mrs, Nellie Foley, Mrs. 
Emma Connely. 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OP WOMEN'S CLUBS. 17' 

Jackson Tourist Club — Mrs. John Jones, Chairman. 
Lenawee County: 

Adrian Woman'B Club — Miss Esther M. Stuart, CUairuian; Mies Dora. 
K. Bennett. 

Hudson Twentieth Century Club — Mrs. Mary Pierce, Chairmaa; Mrs. 
Mystic Bireb, Mrs. Viola C. Fellows. 

Hudson Woman's Literary Club — Mrs. Helen Mae Lowe, Chairman; 
Miss Valtina Bump, Miss Carrie A. Barber. 

Morenci Chautauqua Reading Circle — Mrs. Ella A. Quinn, Chairman; 
Mrs. Luella Smith, Mrs. C. C. Wakefield. 

Tecumseh, Tbe Monday Club— Mrs. J. D. Shull, Chairman; Mrs. J. F. 
Hicke, Mrs. F. D. Hillntan. 

Tecumseh Research Circle — Mrs. G. J, Huey, Chairman. 

Washtenaw County: 

Ann Arbor, Women's League, U. of M. — Anna Broomhall. 
ManchestA-, Saturday Glut— Mrs, Evan Eesery, Chairman; Mrs. Sarah 
Jayues, Miss Marie Kirchofer. 

Ypsilnnti Study Club — Mrs. Lucelia C Brabb. Chairman. 

Wayne County: 

Wyandotte, The Tuesday Study Club— Miss Eva Hurst, Chairman. 

The following rei)lic8 were received from clubs in response to special 
questions prepared by Miss Miller: 

Adrian Woman's Club, Adrian. Michigan. 

1. What are the library facilities for carrying on club work in 
your locality? Cood. 

2. Is there a library in the vicinity? An excellent one. 

3. Is there a public sentiment which would favor the establishment 
of a library? 

4. Is a regular or H)ie<'ial traveling library deeili-ed by your club? 
We have one at present. 

5. Could traveling or registered libraries be used to advantage in 
TOur township or district libraries? 

6. Name localities wliere libraries are most needed. Can not. 

AthCna Club, Jackson, .Mich. 

1. W'hat are the. library facilities for carrying on club work in your 
locality? A good public library. 
No reply to further questions. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



18 REPORT bF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMtSStONBRS. 

Twentieth Century Club, Hudson, Mich. 

1. What are the library facilities for carrying on club work in your 
locality? None at present; our Carnegie library will soon be completed. 
'1. Is there a library in the vicinity? School library, 

3, Is there a public sentiment, which would favor the establishment 
of a library? No. 

4, Is a regular or special traveling library desired by your clab? 
No. 

5, Could traveling or registered libraries be used to advantage in 
your township or district libraries? Do not know. 

<i. Name localities where libraries are most needed. I am not able 
to say. 

Chautauqua Reading Circle, Morenci, Mich. 

1. What are the library facilities for carrying on club work in your 
locality? None bat private libraries. 

2. Is there a library iu the vicinity? School and Sunday school. 

3. Is there a public sentiment which would favor the establish- 
ment of a library? Very feeble. 

•i. Is a regular or special traveling library desired by your club? 
T think not. 

5. Could traveling or registered libraries be u:ed to advantage in 
your township or district libraries? 1 think not. 

<>. Name localities where libraries are most needed. Having lived 
where the free public library is pointed to with pride, it is a matter 
of astonishment to note the spirit of indifference in these esseotial 
matters. The work of building up a library sentiment is a gigantic 
one, and in this section will require time. This is more surprising 
as the people are an exceptionally intelligent and well educated class. 

Tecumseh Monday Cluh, Tecumseh, Mich. 

1. What are the library facilities for carrying on club work in your 
locality? Very good. 

2. Is there a library in the vicinity Yes. 

3. Is there a public sentiment which would favor the establishment 
of a library? We do not need another. 

4. Is a regular or special traveling library desired by your club? 
No. 

5. Could traveling or registered libraries be used to advantage in 
your township or district libraries? No. 

6. Name localities where libraries are most needed. No reply. 

Ypailanti Literary Club, YpaiUinti, Mich. 

1. What are the library facilities for carrying on club work in your 
locality? Ladies library, Normal School and Library, Union School li- 
brary. ' 



i.vL.ooglc 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 19 

2. Is there a library in the vicinity? Tlie above public libmriea. 

3. Is there a public Beiitiment which would favor the eHtabliehment 
of a library? Public interest absorbed in the above. 

4. Is a regular or spietial traveling library desired by your club? I 
think not. 

5. <'ould traveling or registeifd libraries be used to advantage in 
your township or district libniries? Possibly in the country districts. 

C. Xame localities where libraries are most needed. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMHISSIONBRB. 

Report* of loeal 



CoUBl, uid tomtiOD. 


Sum of Jibrir>'. 


^.e- 


No. of 


UliD KbuU bwki. 


Jajk^Co.: 




Fr«i™W* 


17,(00 

,Affi 

30.000 

5;«oo 

1,200 

olsoi 


LihnrimuidybnryConi.,-. 


L«i>w«Co.: 










Supl.<>(8cbool>fidSi!hcnl Bawd 
School boKd. Sum. uidLibVo... 






iwiiiji.".:::; 
SjSt;,;: 

S""'-;:;;: 

Krffi:::;: 






WuhWMW Cd.^ 


Public School Di^N».l. . 

Lib. of I'nivmitv 

SutcNwnial C^leec... 

Mg'i&v: 




Commilln (nim StaW Board. . . 


SI::;:::::::::-; 

"iSi.;.::: ■:■:■■■ 


BfS^^'; "*'"';. 













Tlie replies rei'eivcd from Miea Miller's special questions show that the 
cliihs respondiD); do not as jet fully appreciate the work which the.v 
ran do for library extension in their localities. 

The Jackson Athena Olub made no reply whatever to the questions 
after the second one, thus leiiving the Federation committee uninformed 
as to what can be done in their locality. Mr. Sattler, county commis- 
sioner, rei)orts 65 district libraries in Jackson county, most of them 
ranging from Ave to 50 hooks. These libraries could be greatly helped 
by the aid whi<'h the State is giving to small libraries, and would be 
a fruitful field for work by the Athena Club. 

The Adrian Womans' ('lub made no reply to question No. 5 re- 
i-egarding tlip use of traveling or r(^istered libraries, the report, how- 
ever, made by the county counnissioner of schools in Ijcnawee county 
in 1!M)3 shows only four township libraries and twenty-three district 
libraries. These figures prove that there is an important work to be 
done in building up new libraries and streugthening weak ones in 
the districts of the county. 

The Twentieth Century Club at Hudson could give no information in 
reply to question No. 5 regaiijing township and district libraries. The re- 
iwrt of the school commissioner shows seven district libraries in 
Hudson township, four of which could he materially aided by a loan 
from ttie State. 

The Tecumseh >[ondny Club states that traveling or registered li- 
braries could not be used to advantage in their district. Tecumseh 
township shows in the report to the library commissioner only five 
district libraries, one of which reports only four volumes while four 
of them report under 100 volnmes. These libraries could receive most 
valuable aid from the State. 

The Ypsilanti IJternry Club states in reply to question No. 5 that 
traveling or registered libraries could be used possibly in the country 

D,3nz.,J.vL.OOglC 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OP WOMEN'S CLUBS. '21 



.£ 


Daaibc build- 




Condi- 
(ion of 

boob. 


Ktiulcd in finnini 


d™i- 




Name of librnriu. ' 


1 


&S^«:- 


I;: 


Good... 

Good... 
Good.. 

Fine .'.",! 

Good... 
Good... 

B- 

Good.. 


"—■ 


S.-:::: 


Libruy... 


CJ.WJdo. 


I 


E=!:;.;:;-;- 








Y».„ 
Yd... 






Hi|h8c)n»l. .. 
Librvybiuldini 

ST'*'' 










a^^W^-- 


















Lv^ B. Upnm. 






"'■ 

Y«.... 

y™.... 


Ubniy... 

Library... 
Lib™J... 


«s 


Sf.""- 













districts. Tliere is. however, nothing in the report to show that the 
club has made any effort to establish depositories for these localities, 
nor are the localities named where libraries are most needed. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Gertrude B. Triudle, Charlotte. Report, 

The work in this district is still incomplete. The several local commit- 
tees have not ,vet covered the Rround assigned them. From the reports 
received it is very evident that many districts have no library facilities at 
all. An effort haa been made to have a library in every school honse. but 
as a rule the books are very few and seldom of the proper class. 
One book seller assured a committee that went to purchase books that 
"Mrs. Holmes and others of the cheap editions were the ones they took." 
It would be a good plan to place a list of suitable books with every local 
library committee and school board. 

As a rule much of the library money is diverted from its proper chan- 
nel. A notice calling attention to the law regarding the library moneys 
has been printed in the local jiapers. 

In Charlotte a petition was presented to the board of the Carnegie 
Library, asking that the people of the immediate vicinity might have 
the use of the library, and also that other changes lie made that add to 
its nsefuiness. 

In several places the traveling library has reached many persons. One 
clnb keeps a case in a little country stoi-e where it is largely read by the 
farmers which congregate, and a noticeable improvement is felt in the 
tone of the neighborhood. One difficulty in locating these libraries is 
found in the caution which prevents the securing of people to sign the 
bond, but when once a library ia located the people show an eagerness 
for reading that is gratifying. cisnziid^yLiOOQlC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Local library committees were appointed by the following clubs in the 
Third district: 

Eaton County: 

Charlotte Carmel Culture Club — Mrs. Dora Knapp, Chairman; Mrs. 
Carrie Kent, Mrs. Ida Cole- 
Charlotte Century Club — Gertrude B. Prindle, Chairman; Louise 
Smith, Ida Maxson. 

Charlotte Hansfrau Club — Mrs. Nora Mitchell, Chairman; Mrs. Allie 
Mitchell, Mrs. Mary Davis. 

Charlotte Home Beading Circle — Mrs. Cedenia Snell, Chairman; Mrs. 
Kate Snydet, Mrs. CH. Barnum. 

Charlotte Woman's Club— Mrs, Sara J. Weaver, Chairman; Alice 
Brown, Mrs. Marie Bonfoey. 

Eaton Rapids Ladies' History Club — Mrs, C. D. Slocum, Chairman; 
Jeannette Hosier, Gertrude Hobart. 

Grand Ledge A, B. C. — Mrs. A. Barnes, Chairman, Allie Wood. Inez 
Babcock. 

Kalamasoo County: 

Schoolcraft Ladies' Library Association — Anna L. Fellows, Chairman; 
Mrs. Clara Y. Cobb, A. Ada Brown. 





ReporU 








Ominty ard limilioL. 


Name of librur- 


rXoSti' 


volunia. 


Who »lKK bada. 


K*^" 




ss:"'~'»~- 






1.322 


















PlymouCh CimiblinE. , , . 



















' 








1 Is i. « 














































xr 
















ihdifc. 


bnobl. 


















"■ 






Stnlr. 








































































Drag «.«.... 













Mr 


'■'™- 





D,„„.db, Google 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 23 

FOURTH DI3TBICT. 

Mrs. Ella S. Custard, McDdon. Report. 

Local library committees were appointed by the following clubs in the 
Fourth district: 

Allegan County: 

Otsego Ladies' Literary Club — Mrs. Hettie Wilder, Chairman. 

Barry County: 

Hastings Women's Club — Mrs. Marion B. Goodyear, Chairman; Mrs. 
Annie Powers, Mrs. Sadie R. Cook. 

Berrien County: 

Benton Harbor Daughters of Ossoli — Grace Bobbins Stratton, Chair- 
man ; Mrs. Theodocia Falkingham, Mrs. Jlernice Nortb-Taber. 

BentoD Harbor Ossoli — Mrs. Carrie L. Sessions, Chairman; Mrs. R. 
M. Jones, Mrs. J. M, Allmendinger. 

St. Joseph County: 

Mendon Women's Club— Mrs. Ella S. Custard, Chairman; Mrs. J. 8. 
Evert, Mrs. 0. R. Baird. 

Sturgis Woman's Club — Mrs. R. R. Roof, Chairman; Mrs. C. Jacobs, 
Mrs. C. McKeslie. 

BturgiB porosis Club — Mrs. E. B, Gray, Chairman; Mrs. Sheridan 
Osbon, Mrs. Rose Van Btiren. 

Three Rivers Woman's Cluli — Mrs. J, li. Dickinson. Chairman; Mra. F. 
H. Coon, Sue L Silliman. 

, Van Buren County: 

Hartford Woman's Club — Mrs. Elvira S. Chamberlin, Chairman; Mrs. 
Maud Engle, Mrs. Edith Blashfleld. 

Paw Paw, The Coterie — ^Mi-s. Cecelia Stevenson, Chairman; Mrs. Am- 
mita Spicer. 

South Haven Scott Clul»— Mrs. J. G. Rhodes,. Chairman; Mrs. G. J. 
Wicksoll, Miss M. L. Brown. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY CX)MMISSI0NE:RS. 

Reportt of U>eal 



County ud loulioB. 


NuH of lihtuy. 


sua- 


No. of 

volunn. 


Wbo KkcU book.. 


"fcj-:: 




F™ public 

ESS£ 

as,""-;:::: 

Fnc public 

Fw public 


1,200 

•■s 

1.250 




Bencn Cn.; 












V.-S..*; 


I^^"^^' 
















Ladia- Libruy A» 




'S^S,?'^ 






Ftm to IMBb't'. 














• 



FIFTH DISTRICT, 

Mrs. l'hoel)e P. Fuller, Tonia. Report, 

Seventeen women's clubs have been invited to ansist in library extension 
work in the Fifth Congressional District. Sixteen responded by appoint- 
ing committeeB whose duty it is to ascertain library conditions in their 
respective localities, and where no library exists to use their influence in 
establishing a permanent free public library. 

Many of the country schools have small libraries, consisting mainly 
of supplementary reading and reference books. Tlieae libraries seem to 
take the place of township and district libraries. In a number of town- 
ships the traveling library, which will soon be placed, will without doubt 
be the means of founding a permanent library, as where one has been 
introduced it meets with immediate favor, and the people are not willing 
to again do without books. 

The work of extending library privileges in rural districts will be very 
slow, as it is difficult to secure the assistance of or information from 
township officers. However, the plan of work is well arranged and we 
hope for more definite, results during the coming year. 

Ijocal library comiiiittecs were appoiuled by the following clubs in the 
Fifth district: 

Ionia County: 

Bolding Woman's Club — Mrs. Mary S. Barnes, Chairman; Avis H. 
Coville. Mrs. Mary E. H. Coville. 

Ionia Woman's Literary Club^— Mrs. Sarah Tower, Chairman; Mrs. 
John Hamilton, Ella Hutchins. 

Lake Odessa Woman's Club — Mrs. T. W. Avis, Chairman; Mrs. Dia- 
mond. 

Portland Ladies' Literary Club — Mrs. George E. Doane, Chairman; 
Mrs. F. C. Hathaway, Mrs. Porter. cignziid^yCiOOQlC 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION DP WOMEN'S CLUBS, 
dub commitUei. 



A^. 






SS-^oi 


8iW.«d inj.nni« 


dcp™. 

SUte. 




.^.^. 


) 

1 


LulH L'b'ybld 

ftTKk >HJ itOH 

8d™l buiMiBg. 

Brick block 

Schoal build'l... 


V«-. 

Ym. . 
Yb,, 

Y« . 

?S:;:: 

Y«..,. 


Owrf-.. 

oood!:: 

Good... 

Sj.-.; 

Good... 


Both 


Y«..,. 

y2;:.: 

Y«.::' 

Y«.... 


Lihruy- 


Mn. HJDDW Hum. 
LouiKH.Biikr.J.CCbfe. 




K:::::::::::.:: 


Un. MweIc Hirtin. 
HupsinMidnit of tbcKhoul. 


1 






1 


Frail (umiii( 

ilif 


Oiu. Gnnw. 













ffeni County: 

Grand Rapids Acorn Club — Mrs. O. C, Sessions, Chairman; Edith Vnii 
Wichlin, Dora Dillenback. 

Grand Rapids East Side Ladies' Literary Club — Mrs. Nellie E, Mills, 
Chairman; Mrs. R. C, Bay, Mrs. L. Bovee. 

Grand Rapids Equity Club — Mrs. Anna L. t^teenman, Chairman. 

Grand Rapids Igdrasil Club — Mrs. Eugenia Fleming, Chairman. 

Grand Rapids Ladies' Literary Club — Mrs. L. P. Rowland, Chairman. 

Grand Rapids West Side Ladies' Literary Club — Mrs, Charles Holden, 
Cbairmau ; Antoinette Lathrop, Mrs. F. A. Baldwin. 

Grand Rapids Woman's Club — Mrs. Emily B. Ketcham, Chairman. 

Grand Rapids Woman's Civic League — Mrs. H, Margaret Downs. 
Chairman. 



Mrs. Augusta D. Barnes, Howell. Report. 

The library work of the 6th Congressional District, while it does 
not present any utartling figures, is progiessing finely. There are 14 
federa^d clubs in this district. During tho year 47 letters have been 
sent out and two sets of blanks to be filled out. A fairly good share of 
these have received attention. A few JocaJitios seemed to lack a pro]M?r 
library spirit. Most of the dubs have apiwinted a library committee, 
and through them a knowledge of the library conditions can be obtained. 
Four of the State traveling libraries will soon be placed in this dis- 
trict. The Carnegie library at Howell has been put in shape for the win- 
ter, and work will probably be resumed in the spring. The outlook 
all along the line is certainly very encouraging. 

Local library committeps were appointed by the following clubs in 
the 6th District: , -. , 

4 Dignz.d.vCOOgle 



26 RKPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Ingham County: 

Lanaiog Fortnightly Literary Club — Mrs, S. Jeanette Lawrence, 
Chairman; Mrs. I/xiise Freedman. 

Lansing Unity Club — Winifred Jewett, Cbairman. 

Lansing West Side Club— Mrs. W. O. Titus, Chairman; Mrs. R. E. 
Doolittle, Mrs. J. P. II. Armstrong. 

Lansing Woman's Club — Mrs. Elnora L. Porter, Chairman; Mrs. 
r^ewis Fuller. 

Onondaga Knowledge Seekers— Mrs. T. M. Cranson, Chairman; Mrs. 
Geo. French, Mrs. Grove Baldwin. 

Williamston Woman's Club — Mrs. C. W. Beardsley, Chairman; Mrs. 
lone Shumway, Mrs, S. D, Dennis. 

Livingston County: 

Howell Woman's Club — Mrs. F. J. Lee, Chairman; Mrs. D. D. Horger. 

Oakland County: 

Pontiac W'oman's Literary Club — Mrs. Hiram Bacon, Chairman, Mrs. 
John P. Everett, Ida Durkee. 



Onmly wid Iwalim. 


N.n,e d library. 


^«fi^ 


No. o( 


wbo Mt«tH booiu. 


lag™ Co.: 


Ho-dl Hish School 




1.000 
4.916 










Linngnone Co.: 






0>kUDd Cd.: 




'' 











SBVBNTH DISTKICT. 

Mrs. Elsie H. Piatt. Report. 

Circulars and written appeals have been sent to club women in my 
district whose addresses were attainable, also to many small towns to 
M, E. clergymen. Many of these were unnoticed. On account of this 
fact from the few letters i-eceived it is evident that there is not a strong 
literary sentiment in this ]iavt of the State. Only one library, at South 
Park, has been acquired as the result of my efforts. At the end of this 
club year I will have the statistics of the libraries in my district if 



i.vL.ooglc 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



27 



I have to go in person at my own expense to ascertain the conditions 
in the different places. 1 tried to get printed notices about library 
money but the local papers ignored my su^estions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELSIE H. PLATT. 
Dec. 19, '04. 

BIGHTU DlSl'RICT. 

Miss Kate R. Carlisle, Saginaw. Report. 

Library committees have been formed in the ten federated clubs of 
the Sth 'district. They have been sent all the printed matter, and in- 
terest created in the work. The work has been planned so that this 
month libraries are to be placed in the smaller towns and rural dis- 
tricts. 

Ijoeal library committees were appointed by the following clubs in 
the Sth district: 

Clinton County: 

St. Johns Ladies' Literary Club — Mrs, F. Hyatt, Chairman; Caddie 
Sliaver, Mrs. Hugh Morris. 



m 


DwTibf biiad- 


Iiit 
thdva. 


boSlu. 


Silui'toJ in-fwDiinK 
01 Bi»oii(julurmg 


1" 


He 

«hool 


Nome ol librari>T>. 




S^WbiiiUHiit'.: 
HighKbooI 


V«.,.. 


r«»d... 

Good- 
Good.. 




vT.'.'.'.'. 
y™.... 


LiliriiT .. 
Lihrary... 






'""""' 





















Saginaw County: 

Saginaw Art Club — Mrs. E. S. Campbell, Chairman; Marion Briggs, 
Lilliata Turner. 

Saginaw Reading Club — May Turner, Chairman; Mrs. Lillian Kemet, 
Anna Benjamin. 

Saginaw Research Club — Mrs. P. W. Glass, Chairman; Mrs. J. C. 
Paries, Mrs. R. A. Raymond. 

Saginaw Woman's Club — Mrs. J. O. Haller, Chairman. 

Shiaicassee County: 

Owosso Current Topic Clul»— Mrs. M. ]>. Roth. Chairman, Mrs. E. O. 
Pewey, Mrs. C, 1). Stewart. LiOOQlC 



28 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Owo8»o Womau'B Cliib-JMrB. H. Kirk White, Cbairman; Frances 
-Jones, Marie Brewer. 

, Tmcola County: 

Caro Twentieth Century Club — I^na K. Eayrs, Cbairman ; Bebecca 
nougherty, Myrtle Jamee. 

Caro AVixson Club — Mrs, Margaret Asford, Chairman; Mrs. Dan La- 
zelle. 



Rtportt of local 



County (Bd loutioii. 


N™* q[ libmo-. 


^iff 


i.^. 




"SIS:, 




School 


l.OM 

i.cdo 










X'.-.^' 


SSSSr":;:. 


Fi«pi.Ui« 

jVMpubiit.'.'.V, 
FrccpuUlc 

Dirtricl 




















S^\„n Sb,( Club.,.. 
L*^Lii™rA» 














Y.M.C..* 




TuKoUa.: 









XINTH DISTRICT. 



Mrs 



0, A. Barstow, Onekai 



ReiKirt. 



I received my commiBsion as member of this committee in May of this 
year and. with not a very clear understanding of the work, at once set out 
to inquire of the various clulw in my district the condition of affaire in 
Ibeir home towns or vicinities. 

To the five notices sent each club, ten chibs in all, only four responded, 
namely: Manistee I^akcside Clnb, Fremont Club, Hart Club and Pene- 
lojiean <'lub of Cadillac. The correspondents of each of these four chilwt 
stated that they had good library facilities, and their members had access 
lo libraries both in and ontside of the clnb. 

Xot hearing from the other six cUibs, I inferred that as vacation time 
bad come their clnb work had been snspended and a response would coine 
when the clubs again resumed work in the autumn. 

Since becoming belter acquainted with the library extension work 1 
lotik at it as a charitable one, and want to impress and urge on the clubs 
not to be selfish and only attend to their having good libraries, but see 
that the outlying districts are thus snpiilied. and if in sonic remote dis- 
trict no nucleus has been established for a library, to see that a traveling 
library be sent them. Only two weeks ago such a library was placed at 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OP WOMEN'S CLUBS. 29 

Oueknma and today one-half the books have been lent, and some patrons 
have read tbree books. In looking orer the lists of books I thought if 
there might be more books of fiction possibly they would take better in 
this community, but I find books of travel, science and biogfrai^y are 
most sought after. 

The meeting of this committee recently held at Bay City was produc- 
tive of much good to me, in that I was before attempting to labor in the 
dark. Now my work is more plain. I enjoy it. Theo too, coming in 
contact with the other members, and comparing notes, I was guided in 
my work. 

dub 





Dnerlbc build- 


bit 
e«c. 


Conili. 

book.. 


RiDuted in f4miin| 


-'lit 

dtpon- 

kMn 
fTDn 


IHiriKK. 


N«H of libnoiu. 


Siull. 


School buUdinl. 
Brick building.. 

Bri»khl«t .... 
Epii'lfl'ld Hourt 

Pchi»l)Hiijdiii«.^ 
Y. M. C. A., , 


V«. 
Y«,. 

Vn.. 

Y«„., 


Good!!! 

i 

Grud... 

Oood.. 
Ouod.. 
Oood.. 

Cmd,, 


Both 

KlnurwhiHiic 

lj.i.u|.clunng 


Y«., . 


library . 


HolonHorTinn, 


1 

1' 


1:; 


SiS::; 


HufKt n. Ann 
III*. E. R. Cjuupbdl. 


1% 

1 








Both , 

Both ' 

Both 


Y«, ., 

V.,.., 


Lihttry... 
Librw.. 


L. E- Gould. 
Prof. R. Wlptf. 



TENTH DISTBICT. 

Mrs. M. E. Daglish, Bay City. Report. 

This district is divided into fifteen counties. It embraces a large extent 
of territory, u portion of which is sparsely settled. I have written to the 
4-ommissioQer of schools in every county in regard to the object and the 
work of the members of this library oonimittee; have received many letters 
promising hearty cooperation. They express a wish that free circulating 
libraries be organized in their localities. 

The State Federation of Women's Clubs had during the past year in 
this district, six federated clnbs. 

The Woman's Club of Bay City, a library couimitfee appoiuted by 
the President, are interested in this work. Bay City has a large free 
cin-nlating library; it loans books to the s^-hools in the wards, placing 
a small library in each building, frequently changing the books, thus sus- 
taining an interewt in the minds of the readers. West Bay <"ity has a 
large circulating libi-ary. Sir. Henry 8age presented the building and 
largely assists in its mainteuance. The Woman's Improvement CIhIj 
has a library committee, and is interested in the work. The commissioner 

D,3nz.,J.vL.OOglC 



30 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



of scbooU for Bay county has prepared a full report in regard to the 
libraries in the schools of every district in the county. 

East Tawas, Iosco county, has a free public library, the Ladies Liter- 
ary Club helping in the work. Au Sable, "Soroais" having maay una- 
voidable reverses, is not in active work, and no library committee. 

At Coleman, Midland county, the "Antheneum" is a federated club. 
The president wrote that the club brought this matter of establishing 
a free library to the attention of the school board, but as they did not 
take any action the matter was dropped. 

At Petoskey, Emmet county, the Art Study Club appointed its library 
committee for the club, and is actively interested. There are several 
clubs in Petoskey and they ask for all the help they are entitled to 
receive. 

This is a grand far reaching work : the state librarian is ready and 
witling to assist in every possible way by sending printed information 
or by advice. I hope that great gains will be made and prove that it 
was wise to accept the co-operation of the S. F. W. C. 

Reportt of heal 



CminVM 


lncatioD. 


Name ef libruy. 


^.is- 


No. of 


VIha tdccU boob. 












"Ca, 




'-"•'"■ 


2S,000 
275 




Xfti.« 


EsatTBuuhibUcL'b'y.. 









D,„„.db, Google 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMBNIS CLUBS. 



ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Mrs. O. P. Carver, Traverse City. Report. 

I Bent blanks to nine different clubfi as follows: Mt. Pleasant 
Woman's Club, Big Rapids Woman's Club, Big Bapids Twentieth Cen- 
tury Club, Fremont Literary Club, Stanton Saturday Club, St. Louis 
Monday Club. Ladies L. L. A., Traverse City, Greenville Twentieth Cen- 
tury Club, Traverse City Woman's Club. Received returns from the 
following: Mt. Pleasant Woman's Club, The Monday Club of St. Louis 
(who had appointed no committee), Saturday Club of Stanton, Ladies 
Library Association, Tawas City, and the Twentieth Century Club, Green- 
ville. Have written two different times to the balance, but as yet have 
received no answer. 

Local library committees were appointed by the following clubs in 
the eleventh district: 

dub 



m. 


Dwnbf buDd- 




Condi- 


SiUulfd in funninR 


.u'lubi 
lou 


ItRKrnI 


NuMOf 


libTKim. 






Yc... 
Y«. . . . 


Good... 
Good... 


MuillIlCtllRIK 


Y«,,.. 


Libtarr. . 


A. J. CoAi. 






a.b»>, 














D,„„.db, Google 



32 REPORT. OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMHI83IONBRS. 

Chand Traverse County. 

Traverse City Ladies' Library ABSoriation — ('lara Bates, Chairman; 
Minnie B. Wait, Mrs. Fred D. Curtis. 
Traverse City Woman's Cluli — No committee. 

Gratiot County. 

8t, Loais MoDday Clab — No committee. 

Isabella County. 

Mt, Pleasant Woman's Clab — Mrs. Martlia Budd, Chairman; Mrs. 
ICva Doughty, Mi«. Florence Jamison. 

Montcalrti County. 

Greenville Twentieth C<enturv Club — Mrs. Wm. H. Browne, Chairman; 
Mrs. C. M. Miller, Mrs. C. W. Johnson. 

Ktantoo Saturday Club — Mrs. Marguerite Dow, Chairman; Mrs. P. 
I>evine, Mrs. N. J. Kirk, 

Report* of loail 



CotiBly »Bd Iduiion. 


Naxir .A llbrnrx. 


Fm puMic 


™lu™. 


Who «l»t« He \«di*. 


Cnnd TVirtneCD.: 


m^- 




MO 
0,313 

2.m 

176 




r.rMit TVp 














IJljnirj- Iwixl 













TWELFTH DISTHICT. 

MiBs Minnie O. Trempe. Sifult Ste. Marie. Report. 

Upon accepting the secretaryship of the twelfth district I wrote as 
requested to the federated clubs of this district, addressing in each case 
Ihe corresponding; eeci-etary as found in the federation calendar, ask- 
ing each club to appoint a library secretary. No responses coming I 
wrote to the presidents of these clubs, sending out the circular letter 
received from Mrs. Rjiencer. This resulled in the following appoint- 
luents: 

Home Study Club, Hancock — Mrs. Ki<'hola. 

Study Club, Woman's Club. Menominee— Mrs. Mnnger. 

Ladies' Library Association, Schoolcraft — Miss Fellows. 

Woman's Club, Calumet — Mrs. Hosking. -. 

Woman's Reading Club. Sault Ste. Marie— Mrs. McEwan. ■GoO'^le 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



Circular letters, "State Aid to Libraries" and the blank library forms 
were then seat out with the following results: Mrs. Monger sent three 
library- reports from Cedarville, Menominee and Stephenson, farming 
and manufacturing centers, with a total number of 5,276 volumes, orer 
half being Action. 

Six reports came from Mrs. Nichols, reporting two libraries at Sough- 
ton (the Woman's Library Association and the Library of the Michigan 
Collie of Mines), two at Hancock (the Pnblic School Library and the 
Portage Lake Public Library), the Sarah Sargent Library at Painesdale, 
and the Quinoy Township Library at Qnincy Mine; an aggregation of 
over 25,000 books, the Library of the Michigan College of Mines claim- 
ing over 18,000 of these, and numbering no fiction upon its shelves. These 
six libraries are in a mining district and are doing what they can to 
increase their advantages. 

From Miss Fellows at Schoolcraft came three reports, the Ladies* 
Library Association with 1,322 books, the School Library with SOO books, 
and the Plymouth Circulating Library with -74 books, the latter chang- 
ing its books every six months. Schoolcraft is in a farming district. 
These reports were sent with one exception to Mr. Pattengill. 

Calumet decide^ not to take up the work as the city boasts a fine 
library. 

















Propw. 


Dwribc build. 


lilt 

XlvM. 


Om£- 
bwb. 


SiUulB) b bimiiif 
ttntar. 


dqxsi. 
SUM. 


at" 

punrat 


Nirnt of tibnriu. 




FruHbuildJDf.. 










Ubnry... 


















a.:: 


MMuficmrinB 


a.;; 

v.... 




1 


^B^- 


HclnStoiit.A1I«Hul. 






Birth 











The secretary at Sault Ste. Marie sent out 15 letters in the spring 
to the country teachers, and one response came. Through tlw courtesy 
of the commercial department of the Soo High School the secretary, 
Mrs. McEwan, has a number of typewritten letters to send out to a list 
of teachers furnished by the school commissioner. 

The city of Sault Ste. Marie dedicated a fine Carnegie library in No- 
vember and will make use of 1500.00 of penal fine money in the pur- 
chase of uew books. 

In September the library secretaries of Hancock, Schoolcraft, Menomi- 
nee and Sault Ste. Marie were asked to locate traveling libraries. The 
only requests so far have come for traveling libraries at Dafter and 
Neebish, and for a registered library at Detour, all in Chippewa county. 

The Woman's Club of Maniatique was asked to join in the work. The 
editor of the "Rockland Reporter" kindly published an article bringing 
before the public the use of penal fines for purchasing books for libraries. 



34 



RI3F0RT OF BOARD OF LIBRART COHMISSIONBinS. 



In carrying on the correepondence 44' letters and eeveral postals have 
been sent out, and 28 letters received. 

I wiah to acknowledge much assistance from Mrs. i^ocer, who has 
beeu most prompt in responding to every call I have made upon her, 
and most kind and courteous. 

I fe#i most grateful (or the Rri'^iiege I have enjoyed in my capacity 
as one of the library committee, and realize too fully the shortcomings 
of the secretary of the twelfth district. 

Tjocal library committees were appointed by the following clubs in 
the twelfth district: 

Chippewa County. 

Sault Ste. Marie Woman's Beading Clnb — Mrs. Flora McEwan, Chair- 
man; Mrs. Mary Metzger, Mrs. Clara Cady. 

Menominee Count!/. 

Menominee Woman's Club — Mrs. G. B. Munger, Chairman ; Mrs. A. 
S. Sawyer, Mrs. F. 6. Xorcross, Mrs. H. A. Venuema, Jessie R. Phillips. 





Seportt of local cltifr ammitUtt. 






County ud locition. 


KuM D( librui*' 


'^.^' 


rolusM. 


Who HinU the boob. 


firtiOD. 


^St"-- 


Public School 

Porlagc Tjike Pub. tib^, . 

Womai?ll!brar>-'A^.V,': 

.'^trahSargrutPaipcHem. 


School 

is.!- 


2.M) 

urn 


Su^^^^bool. ...,. 
















Fh* 

Fr« public 

Tnr 

Fm public 

FrtcpubUt 










A 






"ssrA™hi,.. 




Lib'r'n A D'd .of ichoDl Inipl'a 
Rd.olTnutRilLlb.Coni.. 
BoKd of cducMion 





















Couityandloratlon. 


Df«Tibr l>uikl 


■Sr 


booki. 


St..W in f.™. 


tuitnbif 
d^pci. 


An Gn» 

ofelTot 
purpoK. 


Name or llbrariui. 


^IfS^k'"-^ 


DldliBgboUK. . 


Sw- 


Good... 

*G»d";,: 

Good... 


IE;;;:;;: 

Uini^S 




Libr«y... 


























Lib^V.; 




"Sl?^- 
















Poiloffic* 


"■ 





School..., 


™"°'°~-VTc 









REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 



c™w. 




■sj 


°l 


1 


!i 


|.l 


1 


1 

1^ 








5 


J 

: 

j 

s 

M 
80 








m 

? 


23 


g:£-.?aB2: 














1 

4 


...... 


2 

1 


:::;:: 






































■i 






It 


-n 














3 










• 


I 
















T 








I 

















90 

7 






! 


8 


3 


1 




I»g«" ' 


















i 






1 


1 




US 












11 

i 










ec 


130 


iTi.'Sr-T'- 




4 


1 


1 


1 








2 


i 










10 
































■ 


















i 


w 
■ is 

s 

07 

1 


















48 

S 

HO 








Gw. F. Roibunb. 






■■■V 

4 


■ r 






Z 








S7 






; 








I™':: 

















J 


a 






2 









I b, Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Puilic, School and SooUly Librarie* in Michi^n, 



Coiaty iDd louticm. 


NuH of libttry. 


I 

•5 

1 


Clu. 


1 


i 

i 

6 

1 


1 

1 


1 


^'l^?-^ 




IS6I 


. 




h™. 


















HopldM SUtKB 










K::; 




























K'^SJS'd:.:::::: 




isse 

1S7S 


Fiwpubte.- 


■ci;ij;ii,i' 








S-fil'KS.'-;::: 








To.nJhip... 

f™ 


Circulilhii.. 

Bolli 

Ornilitbg.. 


S. H-. 

s.'b... 






%^--' 




TuMioB.... 


d™w. 


Antrim Co.; 




























im 
























1903 

is 

IMO 

ISS 

1900 

I90O 












UanedoEa TDKDihlp 

Artnu Twp 












StMlowMhii. 

Artn»Co.: 






TH.Afi0H. 






Sdiool 
















Tuitioi.... 




a^a..-;:::;:::: 




















, 


















Own... 
Own... 

Bcbool.. 










arr: 


'Ci^^tiiiV. 


!Sgjs 






















Jrsr- 


a^--; 








1W4 

1900 

1882 












BtnwCo.: 


fiuHft Toniship 










S:: 








e"Sr ""'"':: 




K:;";: 


""■"■■- 


Tmtion.... 








BarrjCo.: 
























































. 





















































































































































































































































S. H.— SohooL House. 'Ubrarj 



i.,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
Piiblie, School and Society Lihrariet in Mickigan.-rCommvxD. 



1 


8 


1 


1| 


u 

IJ 

jl 


1 


1 


Ninu and iddrtH of lihruiao. 


1 


i 












99 




Uinc BtTthwick. Pcirlt 


No. 
Ya. 
Y». 

No 

Y». 

?■■■■ 

Y«. 

Y«„- 

S:::: 

yS:::: 
So 

&;:■:; 
£;;; 

Y«.... 
So.' 




















25 00 




iOO 


300 


J. M. BsWuin. UopkbiB StUkt, 

3.B1-1 H.-Wi!«,i.H™kin.!«ii..R.D.3 
H Umom,!, No. ftithmond. 
























33S 

3.m 

i 

2S7 


183 

100 
100 





"is'm 

190 00 

so 00 


m 
7,000 

791 


820 
l.OCO 


















Mn. A. Fi. Lnrn, B^lisir^ 






ffi 


200 




























ltd 

1 
f 

1 

ll» 

9S 

'S 

log 

90 

1 

13 

tM 

78 








2S 

140 
4« 


■'iio 




























IS 00 














,..'", 


■■■,■ 


20 00 






SO 




Alvin f>iiibiini. MiiJe Ridie 






11 






R.n.F iJwti™., 
rJnrttk 




PrinwV. 


.".". 


'200 


27S 






■"'7* 

'n 


:::::: 


'2600 

29 00 

■« .io 














r^TjEj 1 






'iw' 
■ "ioo' 


200 










^,H- 














23 
21 





Ti 


Arlhur nnnl. 
Mnl.io S,ni<h. 
CliM. Stiim. 

ct. AiS^rrt, 

F. R Mor^houK. 
Wm. P. Kdlcy. 
Rnilah Stnr. 
(■h«. KaHff. 






























26 




"is 06 

12 00 


























































i 


::::;: 


400 
SSrt 

en 






















Ethri Wkii... 
S.'A.'4-mZn. 













REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COHHISSIONBRS. 



Pvblit, School and Soeielg LU>ranet in MiehigoH.-'CotmtnJZD. 



Csirnty IMJ locUion. 


Nu» of libcuy. 


i 

i 


a». 


•i 


i 

i 

J 


J 


1 

1 


B«ry .Ci>.-C«. 


n«. .... 
































































































































































































































































































































H^np 







































































































































































































































































































































nj{-so.» 


































































































































































































































































































, 














.i!l 



RBPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONBES OF SCHOOLS. 







PuUtc 


ScWJand 


Sortefy 


LtftrariM in Michigan. — CourmuBD 






ft 

1 

|i 


ii. 


il 


la 

"'I 
4^ 


ii 

V 


1 


1 

1 


NsiH ud addRM of lOnriiD. 


.3 

1 

it 


111 




i 

IS 

1 

8 

aD 


1 




14 e» 






D.'c. W«n«. 

5::SS,.. 

Bi 

Geoige HErth. 
BUiirteBidlmiXD. 

Vtnie Loomn. 

D. E. Murray. 
A. Hminp™: 

A. M. Idmiir>ds. 
RilU .Irfhd. ' 
H. R. Mudc 

BSr- ■ 

Csrl MorwnthJn. 

A. (lil*on, 
C, Shofflw. 
Wdi. HJvni. 

Ed.ird'Fr«t, ;,, LiO 


ogit 


























10 




IS 00 


















1 
































10* 
12 30 






































SJS 


















































4S00 
























s 












































i 

i 

82 

u 

s 

47 

1 

84 

1 
1 

100 
SO 

I! 

90 
S5 


31 




a*»7 






















4SSi 










41 




















:;:::; 


10 15 
8 25 












;:,".■:,.■ 


















1 


::;:'.; 


EOO 








































^ 





100 

700 






































.2 




600 




































200 
































21 
37 




« 


























• 




400 
















































































20 




« 

























REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan, — Comtimukd. 



Comity jud locstion. 


NUM of librarr- 


*3 

1 


Oh. 


i 


1 
1 


1 ■ 


1 

1 


^uSSi?- 


















































































Dili. So. 3 




























































' ■ 




















































































































































































































Y«,k«s^m5;;::;:: 
















































£«:;::;::::::: 














































"■^S-ri 






Township... 




Hou«. 






















sat. 

St*; 

School 

SS"';:: 

FrwDiM... 


cSiuirg:, 

(%tuUting,. 


S H 




















ra::: 

.aiyH. 


Tuiilion.... 








■s 






BiyCity Public 


Tut'n.finr. 














CjmJMinj., 
Cimitatiw.. 

SI!!!:: 












Htnl... 


IS: 

T»,.4fi>,o.. 








ism 

is 
































SftI 










153 












SAool 












Siiiv: 


a. H.., 


















15- 1- ?■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 


imi' 


Rdiool 

Srliod 


Botli 

Cimilaling.. 


S::: 


Dosutfi- 

f."!r- 



































i=,L.ooglc 



EBPORT OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 
Pvblic, School and Society LibToriet in Michigan. — CoMTIMirED. 



1 
It 


1 


1i 


|i 


ii 

i! 


J 

1 


1 


Nunc ud xldMi of Ubniiap. 


2 

1 


1 




SO 

1 

! 
1 

i 

ID 
U 

254 


le 


; ■.::■.: 


I 50 

1% 

3C0 


. 




E.Bub^. 

m! W. Stntta! 
FnokShm. 


Y«,... 

?:::;: 

Y«.... 

pSi'iy. 

No. 

1;;: 






















3 










































«s 


























500 

200 































\ 





IS 

7S 
ISO 
























































8 




300 




























E. D. Hiins. 
Fiy Q. Hiinl. 

Mre. S. J. OvHmt. Auburn 






10 




600 


















s 




*7S 


















J7 

i 

135 




Is 

34 07 













































30 27 
4000 


























i,a» 

,i 

2ea 

1 

'S 
















uisa 




76,363 





Gwfg* KiUkw. W»t Buy Cily 

Gtettic ttBlIm, Wot Bav Cily. 
Grv. Walker, VNt BaiCiLi.R.F.D. 




PriBt«l.. 


.J' 





^. 
















1»8 




Gmx H. I^niiln. Auburn 

XHtie Sirrtn. W.Biy Cily. R. D. So.2 




















war 








33 


Alice L. Htrman. Auburn 

■a»r)-E:cii^in:«»x:jdi™i.siV.: 

Anni C««ir>nWgX.John»i> St. 


















































38 


38 






W 




iZ 






Ri«« Wiin-right, Bay City 


















63 












n.r„. 


W'tttii' 


....'. 


100 




2S 


Otto J.ii>nu)'.K«lB.ydty 




Book.. 




2ij 





SiBnuiTt .4. Li-nni. Biy Ciiy 



























,L.ooglc 



BSPORT or BOARD OF LIBRART COBIHISStONSRfl. 

Publie, School and Society LibrarUt in ilichiffon, — CoimMUCD, 



aiuU ud iMWion. 


Stmt ol Litnty. 


I 

i 


Oh. 




1 

i 

1 


i 
1 


1 

i 


"VLA 




an 


School 

Schom.. .. 

SS— ■ 

Fm public. 

?.S,i.:; 

TowBihip... 

'aiiioi;;::; 

Fn. public. 














Ciroiliitiiil.. 












K 

IBM 


FinAA'i', 






8iW= 




Beniie Co.^ 


Both 

CimilUini.. 
CimiliUnf.. 

CircuIUint . 




Dm. 
















18Te 

SI 

139a 

IBSS 
1S» 


Tiuilon'..! 

TiUliOB,... 

Tualion..,. 






SsKbS**'-'- 


Dmy. 


SaSf:; 






























Own.;: 




Hitta 


£^t..:,::::: 


Tu.Aliiw- 










BariaCa.: 




l«H 


School 


Both 


O-™..- 


















































ISSB 


School 


M^«.. 






















ISftS 


i-H 






EnMrtiin'l.. 




















0-1.: ■; 

O-n... 


Tai. « BC. 






i)irt.Ko.4''.:.'°;..;::; 




SB:::;;: 


Cimilstinc ' 






T" ■■■(«,■■■ 














TiMlioD... . 


















1890 






■'owr:;: 


TalitioD.,.. 

,;■„■;„■ 




School 


CircuUting., 








im 
























ni.1. N>s 


^. 


SfhoBl 


Both 


S-B' 


























Sflio^ 


Birth 




















SSS.'^ 




-, 


a::;:: 

School 

Scl»ol. 


Rrlmict... 

Circul»tiB« 


0-1.,, 


T X- 




jCffoUv.:::::::::: 
























Mt. PlMMDl ScliogI 



















a.H.. 










IS 






HBt™.-... 






IWiBnw School 

Avfty SrhmJ ,. 














Cin^ti»(, 




















SAmI 

Srbool 

Srbool 

Sa:;::;- 

School 


Rdnwoe.. 

Be: 


S.H.. 






Bruich Co.: 




IMO 








KiS;J:::::;::::::: 

Dili. No. 1 


O-i.,. 
Own., 

1:8:: 


■ 








































D..iriz 




JUlL 



RBPORT OP COrNTT C0MMIS8I0NBRS OP SCHOOLS. 
PtMie, School and Society LihTarU* »n Michigan .— ^JoKTlW VXD . 



1 


ii 


3' 


1 


il 




1 

1 


NiEM Hid idditM irf Uhruiin. 


.3 

1 


HI 

i 




. 1 

ZT,644 










An..-, 




Ya.... 

1 

Yn. 

s 

Y».... 
Ya..- 

No. 

s... 
1 

£ 

Ym.... 

S;;:: 

Yo..., 




































l.MO 

64 
SI 
100 


*3 


MOO 


«.2S! 


I4.7M' 






















^.H. WiW 






3 


11 




















117 

1 


7S 

1! 


40 














"■"'2 






















30 
















Un. F. A. Duocw. 






77 


2 




200 


30 


6 






J(Hie B. Rindill,, P«in Van 

A. T. 8t«(M. Bcntoa Wubot 






g? 


..... 


3?S 
















2S 
lU 

111 

1 
1 

ISO 
fiO 

'g 

715 


» 












SiKS-kS:,":";-';:: 






20 


S 


2S00 

■:::;;:: 










(6' 


■■■is 




















■ 'iw' 




Idj V«, Vrankm. Baton Hwbpr., 


So. 












MlU>ckpH..,Buch»»<.R.D.I. 






3 




20 00 










u 


30 








"wiio 














» 




Came Slab, Sintiuville 














» 








""2 
22 

10 


",' 


000 
10 00 




WMSTiSs,™ 






50 




^"T 


Cud.... 






irs&tf'ESfe:.::::;: 


Hoob 




J. 


10 00 

an 


»■ 


.!» 




Y«. 
Y<*. 

Ko 

V».,. 

}| 












1 

m 
m 


LGbde. Bnlon Hirbor. R. D. 1.. 


S^ 




8R 
30 








3 














200 
































g 
























L..,.L...A. 





REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRAET COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and SoeUti/ Libraries in Michigan. — Continued. 



Omnly and locatios. 


Smt it libruy. 


■i 

1 


OUL 


1 

S3 
|3 


f 

1 
S 

1 


1 


1 

1 


BtMCh 0>.-Ca. 






School 

Bcfaool 

Sa;::::: 

Si.;; 
sr^; 

School 

School 

School 

School 

School 

School 


a::;:- 

Doth 

noih 

Roih,"!.',:; 
52:;::::: 

|;;;;:;; 

Both;:::::: 

Doth 

£■■-■■■- 














TowtB. 


RmiTu, 














aAi-.v.;r- 


ItJM 
















ISM 




























§.,":■;: 

Own... 

B.H':: 

11;;; 

?:„":: 

P. ... 

1 ■ ■ 




















r 








SS'b.S'^.^-- 




D™t. 






DiM. Ko. S 






























5.iar{.I?::::-: 


Di»t. No. 2 

eS:;t:::;::;:;: 


isaa 


















School 


Bort. 


?^f; 













SS^"-'-- 


School 

Schod 

School 

as;;;;;; 

Sdioo) 


i;^;^;; 

Both 

Doth 

a;;;;;;; 

Both 












kI!-'----- 


1B03- 
















nnniTu. 






Ditt. So. a 














ati-DV: 






















inc* 






Kit, So. 5 












Circulating 


On... 


Tu.tion.... 
T«.lln,, 

T^Sti^,::: 








IKVB 








School 








"f ■' 


Mhmi Public pEhool.... 





















i3!;,S7K':::::: 




1868 


School 


CiKul.lil.(. 


sIh... 










School 


Rrftrcnn.. 


S.H... 






















School 

School 


CinSXi'.' 


0.n.,, 
Own... 


rSS:.::. 






















Fh Sehonl 




M;::;;; 


Both 


n,.. 








rhiihnJm Srtiool 


l«OI 

1889 










Tinolioi.... . 








jrf"-- 


Both 














Dirt N 11 


ISSO 
ISSO 


































Own... 


Tmlioii,,., 










Toiniship.., 
Pub.Kh^ 
























1 







i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONmiS OF SCHOOLS. 
Public, School and Society Ubrariet in Michigan. — Continued. 



■1 

TE. 


8_. 


H 
II 


■9 


1^ 
II 


1 


% 


NuH uut Bddn« Dt libntriu. 


i 


111 




'l85 
85 

eso 
"mo 

S3 

S! 

w 

7D 

I 

ss 

1Z7 
207 

a 

2«S 


1 












Y».... 
Y»..., 

No 

1 
Is: 

Y«. 






3 


^l^S 


350 


800 
















70 


F'l^Jip?B!l[?"fti 









1 


» 












Gal. 




3 












































































n^^^ii. IMi^i^ CMwdH. 






2 




























































































30 








J 

i 








Ym. 










































































2 
































































C^ 




S 












a ■ 

??■■■ 

Y«;::: 

Y«.... 
\o 

g::;.: 

Yes... 




-T 


I'd 














7 










"cV 




• 


3 


IS 00 

46 70 
3«0 






■ 177 


SIS 




n , 










14 




"Lh^h™::::: 














'1 
g 

1 


1 


...... 


1i 






Il-SB^-- 


















«»V 










































































107 




110 00 






KlSS«iiiE; 








50 






■1 




















Mlh !HcL«ti.E.CH Albion 


















M 












VmiO™.CUinu.R.D.25 


Y»..., 



















*ReceiT«d no Ubnry namy. 



i.,L.ooglc 



REiPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRART COMMISSIONERS. 
PvbUc, School and Society Ltbnriea in Michigan. — Co i r i ' iwum . 



Cwinty iod IwaUon. 


Nunc ol libcw. 


f 

t 

s 

& 


dim. 


i 
1 


f 

1 


1 
J 


1 

1 


*=^^^ 






ri;:;v. 

Scliool 

ISl::::;; 


S=::- 

RcfcmiM... 




Tantion,... 
TuatioD... 






















Din. No. S 




















Tuntioil 






£^LJt;^T"; 


im 


Tixalku... 


















School 

as*;;: 

FncpuUic. 

^"1 


Rd.!r««-.. 

SS;;; 


Own... 

&■; 

0«i,., 

S;S::: 








^l^o.'f?^''--:'' 
























iSSi;;;:; 






















m, 


F«udnb 
















owS;;; 


1 






Diiit.N(i.S 




School::;".;: 


Rtfscnn... 










mi 


El*rUi« 








School 

School 

fS3;:;;:; 

School 

IS--' 

School;;;:;: 

schwii;::;;: 
i;a::::;: 

Tonohip... 

ISS:::::: 

School 

iWiool 


kE::: 

Rclcmici.,, 
Rcrtrrncc. 

Rrfermcc,-, 

Rri™«;:: 


Own::; 

O-n... 
Own... 

£■.::: 
S-.::: 

0.1,.,. 

0.1.:: 
Own::: 








lg:|:h:::;:::;::: 

DSiKoJ::::::::::::;: 

DbI.So.B 

S|!;:;:;:;::::;;: 















UuoatowaUt 


















NwbBgtowubip 

SgrS::::: 






T 




?^£- 










: 






DiM.So.3 




&§s;::;; 














KaJiii,;.::::::: 















S-^til 





School 

Srhool 

School 

.School 

School 

li 
IS::;:; 

!*chcol 

as 


Rif^™;;; 

RcfcrcnM... 
Refcnsc*;:; 

as-':: 


Bl: 

0«n... 

OllTI.., 

Own... 
Oun,.. 

£■■■■ 

g;:: 
o«;;: 

HOOBC. 

JS;;: 














Dist!xu!i,7.'.'.!.*.'!!.'.'!; 

DiBl.Xo,4 

Di.l.So.S 

g:|l::::;::;::;::: 
g:||:::::::::::::: 

































J-iS-iTe'.:;.; 






















Wsypf tn.nrfiip 

Wavne lonship 

Wsyneto^nAip 






Tnsation.... 






ISM 
W03 


Rnn 


























" 




Itttl 



























S. H. -School House 



RBPOitT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONBRB OP SCHOOLS. 
Public, School tmd Socitiy LUmriet in Midutari.-'Coimfma. 



1 




ll 


1 


ii 


i 

k 

P 


f 

11 


Nine uid iddrw of lihuiu. 


3 

1. 


m 
ii 




SO 
140 

!! 

m 
sua 

I. no 












Wffi. PiH(rb.ii»h. CuHpoU. 

^^L^TJ,X'^ 

8:rw"Si.'r?ri::;i;;;::: 


Ko 

No 

?^:::; 

.Vi> 

So 

S;::: 
So::::: 

Ym.... 

|;;;; 

No!!!;! 
So 

-Vo,... 

1:;; 

xo!!!! 

Xo.... 

S:;:; 

No.... 
Xo.... 

Xo.,.. 

£- 
S:- 


S:& 






































H- 






























u 
11 


....*. 


40 00 












i,«e4 


12 


Mao^le Clovff 


Bol-'- 




300 

SO 

50 

48 
U 

so 

1 












Henry And™, Ed.»td.h;,^ 

Fnnt 9. Pwkini 


No (no. 




90 




72 36 










































Ed^Kl^Nila. . .V. V.V.V- : 




















I2i 




»00 






ii~i. 








Cl.u.B««ii.E<h>wdibui| 






7S 

































CI««BWdlt 












25 


















































« 
























EdKurd BI»neliiiH, Silo 


































2 




300 






K-KSSr!;;;-"-:;;;:::::: 




















































W. B. Btaant. Corey 

Funk £. Akcrly. WaMn 


























200 


200 




1 














10 





SOD 












103 






aSs-:;;:;;;;;::;;; 










40 CO 

















































25 00 






L«ia ^iimaq>. ua«>ii»: :::::::: 

J,S.CtiMijn.iif,D<«™iriic 

H.'s-D^v.^if":;::::;;:::: 
?;A-J=i-5KS.»::;.;.:;:: 

lrJ^S:;£rcC.i.d:::::::: 

Hmrr KuMfc, ri...agiM 












! ,30 

















40 
3i 




MOO 






































































































1 


.-, 




'■■»" 


r. 










:::;:::: 'S 















D,j,,!,d=,V^.OOglC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Soeitly Librariet in Michigan. — Continuxd. 



Cuaaty uul butioD. 


Nuu of lihriry. 


f 

"3 

1 


cw 


i 

,1 


i 

1 

1 


- 

1 


1 


Clwt»nu Cd.— Cm. 




Hi 


s,,^ 


Mmnct- 














.! 
























S n ■ 










SSS"*- 






















tUck]»w3cho;>) 


s 


Pr«piibMi: 


it(f<nEOt.. 
Both 


S.H... 

O-d... 
Own... 












Munretanudiip 






















School 

School 

School 












iS 

1686 


Both 

IMtRIIK... 


Omi... 

Si; 

B.H... 






























WolmintPuUieSctod, 






CwwfordCo.: 


Tuition... 




IHckmun Co.: 










im 


^Sff- 


Bolh 


8::::: 


*™^— 


D«W. 








E^S^^— 


SE^^!:^: 




















flolh 






Ellon Co.: 














VM 






























1S»4 




OrcuUlbc 


0-n,.. 












BeUrme loniihip 

BratOD towsahip 




1903 

s 

ISM 


School 


^JubliM., 


Own... 
Own.., 

S::: 


TuMnn 




















SM 


CiicidUim.. 


PKnitlw 












School 

a-i 


Bolh 


an;;: 






































1890 

•im 


School 

School 


Cirtululing,, 








ApvlMon School 

BSSS'';::;;:; 




















































^rlT^n'r 


































^SlSUSlIE:::.-.": 

Eito, Ripid. iwp 




im 






SH.- 


Ub.i«>f,(y. 






School 

School 

sebooi!;;;:! 


Bolh 

Rtfmnct... 
Bolh 






8.H... 
S.H... 










1 

895 


















Cimililing.. 
Cir.XJSg.; 


SS::; 

Own... 








Dill. No.* 


B.." 

















. t^™ >uid lubKtiptiOD. tHoni 



1^ by ichooL UTaution u 



i.vL.ooglc 



REPORT OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
P»Mi^ School and Sodetg L&rant* in Miehigan. — Contindzd. 



8 




ii 

•1 


1 


II 


1 

1 


1 

ii 


NamF iDd uldm a[ lihnhan. 


S 

1 

If 


ii 




119 


32 




3Z3 00 








Ho 

Y«. 

a- 

y'm."'. 

t;:i 

Yo.... 
No 

ii--- 

Yn;:;; 
Y«:::: 

Y«. 
Yn... 

y«„. 

1 

N..... 

s.- 
















30 

1 





is 












122 


Jo" 






























W ttn 








fiO 

£ 

2S0 

'■a 

70 

s 

73 






20O 


200 














91 




so IT 






















63 


io 








iloej 


s 

■ 38 


SS 


























toot' 


WD 


800 


























»^ 


































-4 




















23 

























3S0 


70 




L«i B. Cirvcr. Bdlnue. R. D. 2 


S"'- 


















30 


* 


eoo 

14 00 

4(n 

■mot 


B3 


10 














IS 

r? 

SB 
40 

SO 

1 

UO 

1 


■■■«6 

12 


::"• 








Fkiyd MiUhdl, Eiton Ripidi 


bJ.. 










i 




100 

sao 


IffiSSSS" 


No6n«. 




20 








4 




300 
































3 






















* 




























EthcfMUl™™. E.n,n H-y.* 

Hiidl..UlBi,Gr.iidT*d|!» 






S 


3 


,11 


^ 


uo 


Roolci. 


wii^ 














Golfirfs Rriwo. V»riiiont«ille 






110 








' 





i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMHISSIONBRa 



Public, School attd Society L*6ranw in Michigan. — Contikdxd. 



QHinly nod loutiiw. 


Ni.DK ol Ijtaaij. 


I 

"3 
1 


Clui. 


i 

1* 


1 

1 
1 


1 


J 


SAtoB Co.— Cm. 




ism 






Own.. 


















HniUkm Srhoiil 


1800 

ma 






o«ji::: 








IS;;;;- 


Ss 






























Sonbtd Ux^^ip 




isoe 

1000 

s 

1902 






























SuDflcId tonihip 








g-H... 








Srhool 












Own-.. 


?■„—'- 






{SI^IVm^™.-.::, 














g-S::: 
















°^:^:^-- 




























Grind Tnivrmt Co.: 


















CityLibmiy, 


1896' 

5 


T™!*" 


CirculUhig.. 


T.H... 












F» public^ 






rVmTui 




OTni»n«Citv 

l-n«nU>i.i«W 

CraliaL Co.: 




Rnt... 

i;: 

On... 

&:: 

Omi... 
Oim... 
Cn,.. 


,'■-::: 




ir^^ 


CimJMJBg., 


















CimiUtiH.. 








Diit..No.4 


1902 
1SB3 
















Diil.Xo.3 

KiiJik:::;::::::; 


&*: 


CirculUmg:: 


Ub. Bwncy. 




Hs:e*;;::; 










^t:l 


ii 

1883 










M:::::- 












































On,.,. 








DM.No.fl 






fftd- 








ST^^^ 








1902 
11(96 

ism 




















SS1:!!;:1:;::;::;;:-:- 






1;: 

O.B.,. 

0»n .'.',' 


















Diet. So. 8 

ni«t.Ko.S ',. 


isw' 


















Taulion.... 








m, 


B,u™, 










Kchool 

School 










s 


Ci™l.thig,. 






















■T«„.i,i,.;; 

















D,j,,„d,Coogle 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
PvbUc, School and Si>ciety Librarw in Michigan. — Continued. 



1 


1 


il 

1' 


1 


il 

p 


1 

is 


1 

1 


N>D» >iid >ddr« of librarian. 


3 

s 


HI 




1 
1 

1S7 
90 

1» 




• 




so 




TpuchfT. CJiuloltp, R. D. Xo. 2 


Vfi.,., 

Si:: 

No. 

y«.,,. 
















28 






80 
31 


SO 


















27 
■ 3S 










S-SSSS:"'"'*- 








a.::: 
1 

v«„. 
v.... 

Y.». 

£ 

«:::■ 

1; 

Y«:::: 
Xo 

V.-. 

v".:::; 




























Blunchr SpTMur. ViriiMHitvaie 




Writi™.. 
















3S 
30 




■iS 


iB 


■ '"si" 






?STf 


Autlin HiindaU. CharlnlU 






c'^ksSh^. Iran—Kj. 






SI 

UN 

1» 
W 

1 

m 

«o 

s 

1 

IB 
70 

,.,Si 

102 

,a 
i 


s 




.,. 


Z3 








aw 










* 






Ml*. L-liBE. Mctnlnli. Ur»n 

HflrnPlnul 

Suik Hngrr. Fife Luit 

r.oid'inlfeci^r'""'...:. !.*.:.:;::: :: 

MiTlIm Lrlta. BiniiisKr 




PrinlBl. 



Wri'twi.. 


om 

IS 






16 00 

il 


Hook», 
Boob. 




JuTi. Hofiin. Cm™ aiy 


fisi 


Wri.«,., 


s 

10 
13 

■'lo 


....*. 


ii 

rtZS 


60 


so 


Book*. 

s-t:- 




2S 










Wir,.>hnvtr,St:Loui,R.i>.i.'..;;;. 

I1.MoKrMip.Pt.1«i«, R.D.I 

GnjTKf St.i(iL Ithoci. 

F.r-sif„d. I'<„.„(;,n. . 


B.u.k.. 




K 


'\ 
























f 

s 

II' 


■■■■3 


IS 

270 
MOO 

ihoo 

300 

inos 


l» 






SO 


20 




F.M. P«t.ltli«». R.P.4 






7.1 













K' 



■ Doolu ImI no lonihip uoik). 



i:,COOglC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSI ONERS. 
PubUt, School and Society LibrarUt in Mi<Aigan. — Continuid. 



County «d loMtJon. 


NuH of Ubnry. 


I 

•a 

1 


CU-. 


1 


1 

! 

B 

1 


j 
1 


1 
1 


QnlBt Cn -Cat 






School 


Circuhlb... 


Own-.. 

Own... 










IBSS 


















Di«.No.8 

&.Si:;:;:: :■:■■■ 












School 


Rrfmoc*-, 






























Own... 

aH... 

Own... 
S.H... 
!>■... 

Own... 


TuWion.... 








im 


SAooi 

School 

School 


Both 

Circukting. 














mi 
















IHM 






















Din. No. s 


School 


Both 












g^w^p:::::: 






Both 


Own... 
On... 
Own... 


U h 




HifhSchod 

Dirt. No. 1 


1873 

8» 

S 
lis 








Schirf 








• 




































,.,„. 










Schod 

Sciool 


CirculiliiK.. 
Cimiiiiijig. 








Dut.No.7 

Public. Ubr«y C. t H. 


8.H,,. 






WuS^'"\ ... 


1 
























isai 
im 

IM4 


School' ■,;;;■- 


Sii.,., 

Both 




Penal Sna.. 


Dr-cj-.. 




ill 




0..,^. 


T„„?,. 


1^.. 








B«t... 




















Ral... 


T, „!'. 






Towuhip... 


Ya 




Huroo Co.: 


WidKcortb SthocJ 








CaS"""^'^:;. 






































tt 






































^•^.^t 












public Lihnrr 


IMl 




RcnlV,: 






















T 


I8W 




























ScKool 

SondBnuhTimiihip.... 










«"■■ 










School 




,..,;: 


























DiM.Sn.4 






t, ■ ■ 




















1 and finn. I C. A H. Hlninn Co. ond U 
itainmniu andfiim. tlTnitilion and 



i.vCoogle 



HBPORT OF CODNTT COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 



PtibUc, School and SociMy Librarw in Michigan. — Qostbxuko. 



1. 


§ 

1 


11 


Is 


if 


1 

h 
P 


1 
J! 

1* 


Nu« •Dd iddrai of litnrUn. 


1 


ill 




I 

71 
70 

152 

'■•S 
J! 

1 

a 
n 

1 

33a 

Mi 
115 

'i'mo 

l|W5 


■1 












1: 
I- 

Y«.. . 
Y«.. 

1 

?S:;:: 

?"■ 

£::■: 

v»::: 

Yrt. 










G«. H.D«d.A]iM.R.D.S 


































T 




8M 


78" 




















^ 














2M 
20 


» 

































IB 




400 




















SfiO 


in 














Writini.. 


23 


....^ 


30 DO 


S 


■■■l« 


John A. R«k.f.ilow, .Urn*. H. D. ( 


yS.'" 












m 






T 




400 




iWAW^I«^..UM^, R.'l).i 

A. H. HcDmuM, Adik]'. R. D. 1 


































20 
101,949 

11 


n 






Cwd ... 


'ItJ 


HI 




tf 

138 47 


Uffl. E. !!. GrinKii. CiJuinet .... 


Boqb. 










1,232 


..... 


























John A. Dnrik. Hni^lon 






























8W 

to 


273 




267 00 


4.HiO 




Dadd t-ahtr. H.n«*k 


goolu. 














Al« P. Pnmdie, WKfawwtli 

Inn Hoy HfDufldd, F«t Hope. R.n. 3 

ISs?- 






































H 














































ioo 


«l 


















1.M0 
















AlickE.Ayolle.GriBd.loKCiIy.K.11. 
















« 
































jrt 


» 












N-. 
































Wm. Gritfl, Sfh*it»iii«. R. D. 1 

JohnB-Hm. 

Hrrmn.hu«ol, 

HiM H8lr>-. Bad A», R. a I 

W.J.lK* 


S. 






^ 


« 




20 OO 




























*5 





























i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY C0UMISSI0NBR8. 
Public, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Continued. 



c.-,„.,«..u.. 


NanfoflUniy. 


! 

1 


». 


1 

s 

Jl 


s 

1 

1 

S 

1 


1 


1 


Humn&.,-C«, 


































igiCl::;::::::::::: 














Winwtowwb^ 




























1903 

5 

ISM 

iwa 

i 

1»M 




















S:;; 
b^:;: 

Own.. 
(H-n... 

£::: 














■ 








Rcbool 

Schod 


CirculilJug. 
CirculitinJ. 






DmI.No.S 


t 




















Ui«.No.I 






i 




















flnjinScbdDl 


ftrhool 


Circiibtini. 


















Cicculitinf. 






Uuinf unci DelM 


PtcusntGravF. i)iit'. No 


IS 

1898 


?7,- 


















L. ■ lowiiih- 








owd;:: 


Lib. fund 












Iib.l^... 








1901 
1903 

imn 

1897 


School 
























Un.f 




School;::::; 


ci;.;daiic;g: 


*oira;:: 

K.H... 

On::; 

Own,.. 


iist^^' 




















IW2 

1902 

1903 
1904 




















!S,",?r..~-'-, 










*w 


cir.d.ib;..: 


















1890 






























K 

1902 

1903 

S 




















ol!^::: 

Ow=,,, 
Own... 

oVr,::: 










































F1o« 




















lioth' 






























IfWfl 

WIZ 

s 








ub.r«>dt 






ST.^:.;:::;;: 


SS:::: 

School 

School 

,U«ci,i™. 
F™ public. 

School 

Sfhool 

School 


CirniUiin'ii.: 


o'wn:,: 
Own::: 






















lonUCo.: 










s 


Tu.ll.n.,., 
















Pewsnu Hiih Rchuul 


1S90 






Bmi... 


T««™....- 











"(1c 



RSPORT OF COUNTT COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
Public, School and Society Ltbranei in Michigan. — Continued. 



1 

ii 


1 


il 

3* 


i^ 




1 

1 

■ i 

1-^ 


1. 


.^^^.,^. 


1 


m 

III 
















Hiixl HcAlliiWr, F«K>ii. 
Arnold H«.«r, fa.y Port. 


Ym.* ■ 

v«:.':: 

W 






































































S3 
73 

i 

so 

is 


38 


::;::: 


Ii 

2180 

10 00 

12 OO 










'15 




i.1i.?HaS.""""'":":".v:;::: 


?,",r 




H, S. RodBui.. Elton Bipiifa 








40 






87 




Book!. 




29 




800 
10 00 




























io 
is' 


AilJIMillrrvai.Holt.fi. D.ZI........ 


















T. A. Haunt Mu™, R. D. 25 










43 41 








t03 
29 

28 
W 

8a 

S 

se 

1 

30 


« 


'" 






TMrtrr of PV™.nt Gro«(. UMi»». , . 
J. W. B^Jm. Lanjiog, R. D. 3 

S^-I'k^^'?^ AB-(^[3coli^'. . 
Wm. P. Tlioioiis. WfbbrrviUe 














m 




'IS 

10 00 


37 


zs 


Bwb. 




VI 








ft^il; 






» 






12 




S85 
12 00 
















&nV^^S.Ti?.''i8 


g;;:; 

a- 

v™. 

1: 

yo-,.. 

|:;; 

v».„. 




C«H.,,, 


2t 




i6' 


36 

io 

30 

46 


Both. 




WnhHick. 












S! 






W 




23 00 














TO 


S 




4 75 














■j.H.OliD." 






'i 

IS 

ao 


80 




IJ50 




















20 


S4 


FruikToi™™d.8t«Lbridg. 




Wrillen.. 


8 




SS'l' 








23 90 


Book. 








3S 


30 
















3» 

1 

81 
SO 




















10 U 


7 






















..'"."'. 








>■ 










f:5-.ar""-°-" 






..1 

i 


iio 


8 
6 


Is 










' 90 


10 











































D,j,,!,d=,Cooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
PiAlie, School and Societif LOtrane* in Michigan. — Continued. 



County ind looUoii. 


Nu» »( man. 


1 

■B 

1 


Ou). 


■1 


1 
i 

8 

1 


1 

1 


J 


JonoCO.: 


Hory NcIkd Loud 


1808 


rj-r*' 


Cimilrtii^. 


Own.,. 


».«,.■.. 










»"•■■■-■ 


1889 
1884 


is-:: 


'BoihV.!!!!! 




















(owMhi 








8.H... 

Rent.'.! 
S. ... 














Both 


'• 








IS 

1903 






Wilbur TowLilup 


To™hip... 

s-s 


Rtfsae*.. 




Iron Co.: 






^^^^^^M^'- 










im 




Bo* 


Ub-ftind.., 












im 

IMO 
1898 
18W 






s. !!! 


















lubeUaCo.: 




School 

Collf«» 


Rffcmc*.. 


Sub«Tipi'»_ 
























Sffi"'— 


Appro 

TuotiOD..,. 
t 












w^LS"™*^" 




18W 


School!!!!!! 


Rctmnc*!!* 


?•»■■ 








JukMoCn.: 














































IBM 


Sthool 

School 

School!!!!!! 


Both 

Rermoc.... 

'iWemice.'.' 
CiKuUtini,. 












SJ- 




















1S» 




























1880 
18T« 


Scbool 


CiKubtin», 


Own,,. 


• 
























&.""*•;:■:::: 




S 


School 


CimJ.tiBg. 


&■; 


























a 

1889 


Schml' 


Bolh 












3^^.. 




















School 














Rffmnce... 
Both 


a^" 






^S^^^^it'"- 


DW,No.6 ■. 


1S9S 
1300 


School 




School.. 








Bdiool 










^'Sf."^'"'"-. 










om!!! 










ffiisis.: 


SS-";:: 






















Schod 










S 






O-n... 


TuMlion.... 








s-f-l 





























f Sorikli and librAry fund. 



i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF COUNTY COHHISSIONBRS OF SCHOOLS. 
Pvblic, Sdiool and Society I/Strariei in Michigan. — Continced. 



1 




15 


'1 


II 


i 
1 

P 


1 

il 


Nuu ud Kddnai of lihniiu. 


1 

E 

|1 


III 
ill 




1.138 

i 

204 

102 

K 

'■£ 

OS 
100 

so 

87 
«0 

1! 

S90 

m 

800 
130 
187 

1 

75 

1 

90 
140 


m 


12 


175 00 


1,803 






Y«..., 
Y«... 

y™..,, 

1^^ 

Yo,-., 

I"' 

?:■... 

S:::;:: 

?:: 

fc.. 

Y«.... 

Yn-, , 

P«Uy., 

?-.,, 
?S;::: 

Y« . 

Y«..., 
Y». . . . 


































WO 




Uupm HcGniiiray, OKodn 


































« 


is 66 












185 


■ 'iM 












IS 00 

is 








so 










8,000 


,m 






Cord.... 


78 


■■■e 


Nfllie RichiiK)^. Cr^Ml F^tU 


Kt 




23 00 


^ 


a 

Sg4 

'««a 
i.ieo 

150,000 














H.A.W«Kt,f;h™h»rd.R.D 

F. C. Pmifrt. Ml. FleMKit. R. D 






30 




iooo 








8B0 
■■■24 


6S 


15 00 


».«» 


H. LouuF CcBYim. Ht. Fkunt 








950 

7S0 


John North™. Out. R, D 




















3S 


1 


, 188 






















,,.-!, 


IB 66 
30 00 




















45 




H««lB.Robii»oii.l>T™«« 














.).::::: 


10 

3» 


.■;:::: 


"soo' 

400 
BOO 


250 
187 

1 


167 

72 

200 

104 
75 


FWL. Dinidi. Jukan. R. D. 2 


Boob. 




LuI.V.Mmoii. Albion. R.n. 3 

Loui* Lowtkn. Uunilh. R. D. 3 






a 




200 


Nofinn. 




IS 




10 00 


100 












27 




17 40 
32S 
250 


























» 






85 














3 




500 

700 






!,*.»». 






































sr»'>£.'s.iii..*..ivv„ 














50 
















'' 





























i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, School and Sociely Librariee in Michigan. — Continued. 



C™ty ud lofdioB. 


KUK of lilltlfT- 


1 


Ouu 


1 


i 

S 

i 


1 


J 


K>lkuksCo.: 




19D3 

1S8S 












isew 




School 

School 


Birth'.:::::: 


OWB... 






Tu-JtHua 
Tu.«Em 














1901 
ISD3 

IBM 














la::;;;; 






TButor*' 








IWenocf... 


Own... 

0<rn... 
O-n... 

Own, . 




■^i."" 












Su™4fi™; 






School:::::: 

School 


Both 

Omibtins - 

K:::;:;: 

Rrfffmor... 












^^■li'o'g.?-^^^"'- 










£:: 


IS-lg^ 














1101 














teS".'*'"' 


isaz 

1900 

ia»4 

1800 






Schorf, 




















Bebool.,!'... 


Cin^tiM' 
Rt(tmc(. . 


'sihoii' 

Rchooi:: 

Own... 


Tua^.... 






Cdtdoou High School.... 
Holy CWnan School. 




































School 

School 

School 


Both 

Rdctfon... 
Rcfcmm... 








bj™i 












Tu.t»D„.. 




















8;s::: 

Own... 

8S::: 

Own... 


Tu-ifin" 








1(03 

Si 


^;:: 


Cin^iipg.' 
CircuWiiig.. 






Diit, No. 8 


Tu.«(«* 










Ss^;:;; 


schSSi:::::: 


iMmiicrV.: 
Rcfomcc,.- 






-"stk*,™ 


TultiOB.... 




aasy 


BcDhmp School 


i 

WW 

ises 


School.- 




















S"..:: 














Ub. fgnd... 








School 


■ci^tiBg; 








I?rr 


Tuca- 








School 












mi 

SOT 
1899 

i 












a,!""": 

School 


CircuktiDf. 

Both 

CimilatiiK. 


o»S::. 

Own... 


Tu.ABdh. 
TmtioB.... 

TmUiMi.... 

T>i»t™:::: 

Tuntion.... 




i;™dR.pi<iir.i;„.. 






ess;;:::;:::::;: 








SsIk;---- 


















Towwhip... 
















School 


(Vculillnl. 
CircuhithiV.' 








^.'r^s^T'r;::::::: 








S;:: 


S;S;" 

















i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
Pablie, School and Socitty LibrarUt in Af ichi^on. — Continued. 



6 

1 


1! 


H 
Jl 
J' 


■5" 


1 

ii 


- i 


1 

i 




S 

1 


III 
f 






u 




»» 


10 


10 




Y«. 

yS." 

v2::: 

v«..,, 

Y«.... 

£;:; 

Y«.:;: 

?;::;: 

yS:::: 

Y*" 

?::::: 

a: 

Y« . . 

Y«.-,, 

S:: 

Nn 

No 

Y«,... 






1 

m 

142 
90 

i 

1 

1 

'!S 

■ m 
va 

117 

1 

16a 

12S 












m 














Mn.C. £ WalHD. Kalkuki. K. D. 1.. 


Boak*. 








50 00 

G«0 
10 00 


«5 

'S 

ii' 

100 

20 


so' 

so 




PHnlrd. 


10 




'^SS^£M:'^:Ev. 


Si. 




" ', 










',£"«.Sa-.W.»:r,r»::: 

C. L.Johii>ton.r.'dRipid>,R.D.H... 
Jaw K. Johiulon, C/d Rip' R- D- » . 












'^'"'^.. 


33 




400 
36M 


1 

27' 

300 


Ii 

n 

2 


fiooki. 




nviE.n.L«.B«lm™tRTl.ia 


B«>kt. 


Prinlfd 


U.J. CVMuri. Byrun Ontir... 

BWLi L. Hum. B>™ Unln R. D. «4. 


Booln. 








10 
24 


'::'± 


SiKiSS,'"-"" 




















3 15 


■j.p.c«>ky:Aiii;H;D,»,'.:;;:::;. 

Cikdonia. 


Ya. 














z 




1 25 




















2 




8 2S 


25 
25 


50 
8 








StuTrUn, TwininiE 

R. Sl»uldii.R. G'd R.pdi., R. D. 12. . . . 

<;». W. Goriiini.^iMult. Mirh'. ! ! ! ! 
Ml.Eckdi.M. Avwy.CnUrSp". 












Baiki 




■■,»■ 


::::. 


ijs 


a- 












) 












NdSim 






2 75 


■""ia 




E. >f . BrmtT. Bvrai Cmtrt R. D. «, . . 

UinniFGIU. I>ii««iR.D.«0 

01iyt8taiifr(r,r.lrionii.R.D.57 

Blhi Mhtid, Dutton R. D. «l 


B. 




00 
20 


100 






13 

■ 20 


2 


200 
7»6 

10 00 
450 


Koola. 




12a'.«80' 
23 


"z'M 

■OS 






Both... 
PrilUd. 


S.DH1.I n. R-Mk 

AliM B. Dickiuux. G'd Rip'. R. D. 4. , 

Unn. Ri>».Di.G'dRApid>R.D.12 . 






1 




750 


C. Ri Nayimilh.Od'dFUwiiR.b.V 

Bnih«J™«,(:r>ndR.pi£H.D.4 

Wm. Sf MIb, ai7 E. Fulloo, G'd Rip'i 








J! 


11 

00 






U 




SO 00 


.VoBbb 




24 






IS 

is 


30 
100 






Prifiuid 




If, 


Fmi Bfldiim, Bfld.nn R. D. 17. 


SI. 





















D,j,,!,d.,Coogle 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Pvblie, School and Society LQtTarirt in Michigan. — Continued. 



Couitv ODil lotitim. 


NuK of librirr- 


1 
J 
■B 

1 


CUa. 


1 

.1 


1 

1 

ts 

1 


1 


i 


/a„».?jp" 


TowruhinLiliniry 


1884 


School 

iSSSi:::::: 
8?h^:::::; 

ScIiodI 


Both 


o"S':: 

EdiooL. 

fe;: 

O-n... 
0*n.. 
Own... 

i; 

School.. 
Own... 

Rent... 


Tu.ASm. 


























■ 




F.i«J^f«i. 






























^ Pl^WdTiri. 




1901 
1901 
1887 








Sdiool 

Sctiml'/.',!, 

S:::::: 
ffi:::::: 


'Boih,:::;:: 

C™l.ttog.. 


T„.*E.-. 






a%rr' 
















ay.:- la-.: ■:;;:;:; 


1808 

i8Ge 


T«.4«b'n, 










Trntioi.-,-. 
TiiUion.... 


























Scbod 

Schod 

TJmnAip... 

Bcho<rf:.;;:; 

School 

School 


5:;;;;;: 


Sf. 




Sou'tli Omd Rai»di... 




^ 


T,..4lb., 












UOl 






eparttTiroiw.Algo'». 


DW. No. 12 h 


Mr 


sar.:: 





8iHi«rT 












?H 


RdtrcBct... 


p. H... 
B.1«J. 


















School 

n« public. 

School 


OKiJatinc.. 
Cirtaliitui(.. 










KM 

]«04 






TyrontT 


Oubbadi Schwl 


SSi: 










teSS.""::.::::: 


School 




owJ,:: 

Oim... 
School. 
Oiiii... 














1892 
1900 

I8W 

1 

18»3 


TowDHhip... 
SAooL.. ... 

School 

School 


Cima.tii.1:: 

RftocM.... 








rHrt.NB 3 






























Wyon,iniT.p 

WjBiningTwp 

Wyoming Twp 

Kf««i..w Co.: 








School 

TownAip... 


Both 

CirnilUii.1.. 






P.H... 


.... 




















Etfk Harbor Tip 


iw 


School 


at«ditb«.. 


Rent... 








Tuition.... 






Tow«l„p... 


RtfmiH.,. 




L.pmCo.: 


































































I'm School 






1 








Dirtfso. 11 tr 



























































i,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF COUNTT COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 







PuiKc, 5cfc<»I and Society LibmrUt in Michiffon.— Continued. 




s 

■1 


i 


ii 




II 
II 


1 
H 

p 


1 

1 


Name tai addroa of UljtaruB. 


1 

it 


1 




I.MO 

1 
!S 

M 
36 

1 

8« 
11 

S34 

1 

i 

107 

a 

43 

47 
US 

1 

1 
1 

■I 








-•? 


" 




Y».... 

v»;.,, 

1: 
^^ 

r 

1:- 

Yea.... 

&::■ 

Yea... 












Chu. CBorat. Cedar aprinsa 

Lm C. V.hL™. (IranrfRaiM* 














WritWo' 


33 
31 




JIM 
14 85 


£32 
25D 


:;;;;;:: 






SSS.?S'JSfSSK.«'. 

Marguct Graham. Ada. R. D.42 

TTUit Woolnw.C'd Rap^da. R. D. Ho. 10 








20 
















i 










2fl 


as 






BcaaicOuk. Rwkrord 

Want Churth, Spula. R. D. Nq. 20. , , 

HuelC.G™. RwUonl 

Flonnn Kondi, Cedar SprinD 

E. HcwT, Sand l.akeR.D.35 

Jai. E. Haona, <><iar Springa, R. D. 30 




Priiuj.: 


■S 


* ■ « 


SS: 


















s 




17 ao 


25 

40 


i 


NobH*. 


PrinW., 


4 




MOO 






















l«4 


!?;.'&';■&'.«■*':;■■■;■■ 






SO 














^ 


















Hn.EI>ie Dra|.iT 

P. C. Poulann. Lincoln Lain. R. n. 4t . . 
Mn. EUa Driprr. BirvinLK.P.SO. 








■si 

50 












Kr 




















Uitlon Robinaon. Kant City,R.D.24 




Wri..™.. 


33 





ii 

18 00 
500 


""m 


40 


Book.. 




Mary CIsnRlHuae. Kml Oty 






2U 


■■•■j' 






125 


IflO 


E. F. iiwia,'Cr;idH.pid^R. R S:,'. '. '. 
N.Luiiakc.4»80>ltenAn..nil Rsp'i 


No6a«. 




1 


. 


1 W 




, 














235 








Printri.. 




12 


Jdo. E. Milkr. G'd Rapids R.D. 2. 


Bmb 














S-Kr>iil!ia.i.,: : 






E 




5 76 


EO 


50 


















Yea. . . . 










ioooo' 


4.000 






B^ 
























Loraai. W«nl,.Jml»>-Cit)'. 

Frank Booth. Auiea. 

Carl H«h.(lSfurd. ** 
R. C. ChurchiU. BuniNd;. 












;■; 



























































































































































i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSlONBRa 
PuWtc, School and Society LArariet in Michigan. — Continded. 



.......... 


N.™ of Lhruy. 


1 


CUm. 


■{ 


1 
1 

1 

1 


3 

i 


i 

J 


•"On""'^"- 






































































































































































1 
























































































































































































































; 






























































L«.B«« Co.; 


























o-r,:: 


fe^ 








Ifl02 
1S97 

1888 


sehooi::;;,: 


Cir^JlSlV. 






gsf-ts 












r.::; 

Schoal 






isj-«-;:;;;;; 


^mi-feid»=b«.i 


School 


Cimilitini.. 












iS^Z^d. 










^ 


ReffnDR... 


Chm... 

OWD... 








l«S 


t 










K'?^ :■:■ 




1880 


BcWl 


Ctoliiioa-. 


p. H,. . 


"■-■■■■ 












1902 




































Own... 
School,, 

School.. 
ihm'.'.'. 


Finct. V^ 
to ^hoh«. 






ar."'::::::;;;:: 


1817 


Ekiwoi 

m™.i 

AMDrialioii.. 

School 

Srh«.1 


Ciraibtini.. 










E"£r.*^;; 


190! 

1X87 
1903 




















I88U 


PSr-; 






nitirici 














0«n... 
















(VmblinE,. 


(C" 








im 

















SubHTJpUopfl, firwv, fndoi 



'"tjfc 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONBRa OF SCHOOLS. 



Public, School and Society LibraricM in Michigan. — ConninjED, 





Jii 


i 




"1 
11 


i 


1 

il 


,^^^.,^. 


1 

it 


It 
JII 
















W. D. MoK«i,«.lmUyCily, 

I.-iiSt.-.i. 

Thw. H. Taylw. Inlay City. 
John TLtr^ Imlay Cily. 

ffm. Bniw.. Imlay Cily. 

HcTn Lamb^LapHr"' 

Bymn Hmitli. Coluinhiivillp. 

W. A. Joi.«.Ol»rLal«. 

Sun A. diirli. OtUr LhI». 
Edwin Hathnli', Lap«r. 

U. Church. Thonivillt. 

W. n. HnirinKt™, North Bruirh. 


Tm. . , . 
Y«. 

S:::: 


















































































































































































































































































































































































































C. A. Buisell, LapKC. 
C. L. KniRen. Addinon. 




CW.,.. 


2S0 
75 
283 

1 

'1 
1 


1 


"is 


iisss 


"■? 


■ioo' 
■■■'.■ ao 














Bolh 




I 




..ss 








FripUH 


40 


W. L. Rpfd. Blirffld 

Muiha A. f>inilh. llUiwGcld. R. D. i 


g»oJ" 














S 




ISOD 










m 




E a B SMitl. nint™ 






Chu. 1.. Smith. 






10 

s 




SCO 
1 32 

3X 












-m 














SSS::::r 






iJ6 


IS 






■■■« 


.■■• 


18 19 


JO 


'I" 












Kinlnl.' 


Mnj.W\H.AlDar:Bi<U^-.V.*.:'.'.:;' 


&„■!.■ 














On-l 




» 




noi 


130 




a A. MoKohm. 

Mn. P. H-Bouttn, RpriDpiDe 


Booksi 




' 

























i:,COOglC 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COHMISSIONERS. 



PMie, School and Society Librarits in Michigan. — Coktikited. 



OHity >i>d botiofl. 


N™ of libr»7. 


f 
1 


Ohi. 


1 


i 

a 

i 


1 


1 

1 


■■ISSi, 




ISM' 


FrnmiUk. 

ToWMllip.,. 


CirailMiDE- 
CiHmUlm.. 


O-B... 

P. H.. 






"&'j6™o,..,. 




ass 






IWS 
ISM 












Toitmhip.,, 


dreubiin.; 


ft'. 

owi.;:: 

Rnil... 

S.'!;,: 

Own... 
Own. . 

OllTl... 






Igi:'^:;:-: 


S'JjST^::::::;:: 


1889' 


7^.ib**. 




H»<»Di«e C»^ 




Frrepdilic. 












UiukecDii CO.: 














To-iiJiP ■ 


L-ir™l.lhi|. 


TiiUton... . 








I8M) 
1S8S 








FrRmiUic. 


Boii.::::::: 

CimilMhn,. 


D^.'. 










1874 
IS74 

IMl 

isn' 

IWI 

Si 

1901 

!ffi 


■T«V»ilii*", 

flociila 

Tuulion... 








TollSlE::: 

»cho<)l 

FrwpoWic. 


(WulMiBf. 

CimibliM- 
Cirtulntini.. 




N.j2J«^a.: 






Ji;£s3 


i)i.t.No.'3,;:::::::;;:. 






Bolh 












lib. mono 




B*rt« 




iMiDol. 

Schodl.. .. 

^05""" 


Rrfi^^;,: 

CimiUtiii*.. 


















T«.tioo,... 




























&^,"; 


ssa: 


School 

Rpnt: : 

Scliool.. 








B«PnvK Top 

Bsnar-r.:;: 

KSHi,;.:-:- 


Ig 

■Ml 

ma 








£!£"' 










FbM 






a:::::- 


CircuWiiw . 
CirtulntioK,. 




































DnnwSthorf 

Dill. No. 1 (r 

Dirt. No. 1 

£yi-:;;:::.: 


wo 

881 
1901 

li 

IBM 


School 

schlSi:::::; 




















School.. 








t -wl.' 










Qua... 

OBii:': 

Rmt... 

n«B.":: 








Kimball Lak. 


Srhoor 

."Vliool 

.Sriiool.. .. 
Fm public. 


Bolh. .... 






Onrficld ft Aihlond 


SoriJ.... .. 














Toislion.... 
TiutioB.... 








isn 








Ks-e;;:;; 






School:::::: 


K'"™: 








Tax. A dun'. 
















fchiwi 

Sfhnol 


CimilalinB.: 


o"::: 










IWT 


Riib.Alina. 












1 







i:,COOglC 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
PiAlie, School and Society Libraries ia Michigan. — Continded. 



1 


1 


i 


il 

'J 
i' 




1 
Ii 

p 


1 

1 


Hunt Md addm of Ubrariin. 


3 

1 

it 


Ii! 




1.082 

g 
S 

"i 

300 

1,28S 

87 

•s 

m 
es 
w 

79 

B 

» 
108 

S 


S30 




»»9n 








No 

1::; 

?:; ■ 

Ym.,,. 
No. 

yW.;:: 

Yo. 

Y«.""' 

1:: 

Y«;... 

Y«,... 
Y«..,, 

V«..,, 
Y«„.. 

1-^ 

£; 

Y»:!': 

V... 

y": 






■■" 


100 
100 








20 




■■7406" 
■7s 00 

IS 

30 00 






E. J. Lacha». Mukiau liUnd..... 


NoBf,™. 












2S0 

son 


200 






^:S:?rrASf^£:r 


Nofina. 




IS 

0,760 
SO 

s 




S^ic?^r«."fi^;H;i..2::.; 

Honlwut.Micb 


Booki. 














« 

■ 5 
19 


3U0 
■■■■3 


2(0 
10 00 

IS so 

10 33 

10 w 

JBCO 




c^::: 


J, Et.Grali>DLHuBk»ii..R.b. i... 

Albm A. Andtraon, MonUiw 

Mn. Hrloi D. Htdgn. WliiU^II 


Doob. 




iio 




















W, H^^'Boui Rwd'citj"No.'2"!l! 






132 

1 


«■ 

123 

48 












InaGoebrl 












Bvtlii FWe, Frtmont. R. D. 3 






OmMHlLn. Fmwql, R. D. 1 


Boob. 


















«ri..™' 




24 21 




140 

104 
■306 








Kithtrina Kinney. Ho-ard 


GaX 




1 
1 

78 

g 


■i 






■ 200 


Mar; Hovkica. Sand Likr. R.D.30.. 
Almtda Frwnan. Walktrvilfc, R. D, 1. 

Ckirln Smith, N»m» 






5 




IS 00 
















IS 00 




SO 














■■■-,■ 




noo' 




75 


L.B Alfcn 














W 


Bemiwr,. KrinnWl. .Ntnnyioi. R. D. 2 

Rnvmi Marrh. Gnnl. R.D. 3 

Amanda E. Johra™, Grant. «. D. 2 




Writloi. 


■"■"4 


'3 


30 00 
MOO 

16 00 


,*'. 


Nofin«: 










PrinM. 







is 


e 


ftiii Bird. WTiil^ dood No. 1 


Boob. 



















D,g,-,„d::,L.OOglC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
PuMie, School and Socitty lAhrariet in Michigan.— Costoivsd. 



County ind b«li™. 


NuK d libruy. 


I 

■B 

1 


dim. 


5 
,1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


Nrw.rto Co.-Cw. 




1902 
IHBB 
1S3S 

S 


S|7l 










ShnidanTcn-DBhip.... 
ShfridiD Townibip.... 












!».Bid>n To-oUp 








'^ 








Sebool 








Own,.. 
Mfhool.- 












UimitatiDj.. 










KS:::: 








I- 

■sen 


Ud'tUb-j.. 


Both 


Scbool,, 




^m- 






[^Sciiuhsibioi,,::: 

Royal Oak Tup 


Own.,"," 






LM|-iLib>,- 
F.P.iSrf- 


Cireulnliiig.. 


Ta«.4lu.«. 
Frnftftna. 
















*^«nS:il To™J.inr, 






T^uhip^V. 

T(H.-Ilri.ip,.. 


Cii^tioi, 
CiRulatinl.. 


RniU,, 
P. H... 

■r»v.:: 

Own... 
Schosl.. 






SheLbyTowBiliip 


1M0 

B 

1903 
19IU 




















fithool 














H™yT<.™lup 


Rivande EcboD] 

Dirt. So. S 




CiiculaliDg.. 


P. H... 
On... 


Fm« 

J 














?.a,*- 


Both 


S„";: 

Scbool.. 

K::: 

On... 






SS;-™":::::: 

TwnCOmm Schoql..,. 
OKwtaTimuhip 

E=?i.'SS;V.;: 


1!^ 
IS 

IBDS 






SthcoL. ... 






SlSXn^ipV,;:;:, 




sat: 


Ciiculatinl.. 
Cimilntini.. 












FixsjESoc. 
















ISM 






























18M 


Tamifaip... 


CimiWhig,. 


S- 


Tuation... 














ISfiS 
1S76 














Siv.-.: 




FiDs ... 
Fl„,,.., 








Oeulnfrng.. 
Cimilitiol.. 


■i.:B:: 

On .. 

&:: 
a.:: 

s^hoii.' 








^lOF-nnniJip 


^dr>- T».Ttfliip 


1878 












lirinfgiUiii Towuliip.... 

■6<e;RnWTjrp: ;::,;;■ 






Tuatioii.... 
Tiulion.... 

Lib"f«lid..: 




UiiDEKton Ti»ii>hip . 








OtwmUktTVp.... 


Tn^hip... 


RrfmmcT... 




"S'';; 




1901 


S,:::::: 








Kis^:i:;;";;;;;-; 


Lib. fund... 








EtESiS.;:: 






SchoDl. 

























D,j,,!,d=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
PuUie, School and Society Libraries in Michigan. — Contintjed. 



6 

! 

■I 


s 


iJ 


J. 
11 

3^ 


5 . 
1" 

IJ 


i 


1 


Nsmf and >ddi« «l libmian. 


3 

f 

it 


ii 




600 


83 




Tfti 








Y«,.. 

Y«:.'; 

£■ 

S::;: 

|: 

Ya,,,, 

Yea.,.. 
So 

r«:;:: 
5::;;:; 

Y« , , . 

Yn.,:. 

v«: 

Y«. 
















90 

S 

300 

•i 

i 

97 

S 

8S 
2TS 

'i 

u 

141 

TS 
Si 
180 
112 
120 
420 

316 
IBS 


900 


2«i 




















J 




18 50 


18 


132 


L.J. UunkiT 


,?r- 
















28 

fiO 

353 

33 

20 
82 


■3 


20 B3 

11 


2.000 
' M 

360 
18 

an 


SO 






Ptint.d, 


S.W. Hiilbnl, HiEhbnd 


licwkj. 


PrioM. 


900 
380 


KSiSi-S,"'-'"™*"- 






tin. J. HravfliR. Ruyil (kk. 


l«o.>k.. 




Edna RoQiu. Han 

A. L. AvwiU. Mfoni 


St: 
















31 

"32 

32 


;■■■■ 


72 B3 

■ rid 

10 00 

s«o 

18 00 

■'kioo 

U«ft 
900 


140 




iiitpl. E, P. RfynoHa 

a™. J. R.U<ld.H«a.y. H.b. 1. .. 


t^ 




M 






SS'i.!rSk"&.::::: 






280 

to 


M 




Wrilloi. 


Libbic B. Ptarr. Park Uk* 

H. R. Wibon.^rk Lik« 

Ralph I»aDd.ard. Lmy 


e: 


ttnlln. 


'lOS 


'i 


Mn..M™d. HJI. R«dCity 






RaHnn Ru-rU 






8 
10 




210 














30 














R. K. Davrnpofl, tu.lin.H.P.2,... 

5ri.i3SZi«LT™.„: 




Writt™^ 




300 

;e 14 


ISO 


ISO 






I)>n Lallinx. E%irt 

Mra. H. A. Srhappi. T»iiB 


Nofinr.. 
Book- 




















219 
































Jf^lS: 


ito 

107 


TO 
■ JO 




70 00 
980 

13 00 


IW 




TrTk HiiSJblph: 

r. F. n.«rch. BfTlin, B. n-2 .... 

Lil. *!.Mrd. Jmiwn 

.<ni>a Kraai 

H\id«.n.ill»; H. 1). 1 '..'-':. 


nook-. 
lt,.,k.. 



i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, Sehcol and Sodely Librarieg in Michigan. — Continued. 



COuiKr 'id iDCatWD. 


K<upe ot ILh«ry. 


1 

i 


Clu>. 


1 


f 
i 

i 

J 


i 


1 


OtUn Co.-Ctn 










Scboel.. 


Tu-ABdo. 






















SS-iv 




&.■:: 

School.. 

P. a .. 

0.11.., 






.Grand Hav™ 1^1. ■■ 




mi' 
iiii 


TU.ASM. 




IV .J... 


Cimilaling.. 




Hollond Tovnihip.... 


BLKiiV:::::. 




s.t-np.-..: 






SiSit::: :;.::;; 


IS 

ISi 


gS::;: 


SSSi": 












8Ur 






















iitfmin.-. 


Own... 








8;;^^^^^*'' 


issi' 

1885 

\m 

IMS 

laeo 

1868 

iffi 

1SS2 

IS 

ISM 








Towuhip... 
School 


Cimitating., 

Buh...:::: 

Boih.. ■.■.;!! 


Ub.mowi 






Fl>nil« To-mhip 

K£i:::::::.:::::; 










Polklim loniuhip 


TiSJitoa'" 




>) S^in|Latett«™hip.. 


SpriMUk«TowMhip,„, 
















S^l;'/""*"p 


Sl,.:^:;. ;::.;::;:: 


Lib. nKBCyi 

?"■!'■-■ 


























■^lUt^^ 


S|Ssr*'"':: 






Own... 

owS;:: 
b-n::. 

Own,. 

K:: 

Rem.. 






SSS^'ci.y.,,:;.:...: 


Schuol 






HiHil»tO.>7.d,ip 

SwnaoCo.: 


T^nrtip 


Towiuhip... 


CiKuliIini.. 










BhimWd HjnTiAip 


11 

1S02 

I8M 

1878 

1884 
18SB 
WOl 

'i8W 


fc^.-:- 




'' Bu^'Xu 


SI- 


iiii^..: 






ni.i,N..S 

S£i' 


SS:::::, 


«™:: 


































Own. 




lSS5!i;;v. 


srj*"-: 








SSS "•■""■ 







Hilt. So. fl 

Kil.No.7 






















Sutacript-n. 

T„„T, 




BmeIbsw lovnghip 


■irfMBl 






Om.. 

RmlV. 




l)irt«l 

Pionwt 

SMiiCrrtkTu.iahip... 


IRB! 








FreTpubiic, 






siircSkZISS;;;; 










K.™" 






srhooL. .■;: 


drmlniinc 








IS! 










Scliocil. 



















IcIhv] HuidF. '.^iitminrinlicTi from city. t Enl* 



LiliTJiry nHJn«> 



oogle 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
Public, Schotd and Socitly LibrarUi in Michigan. — Contindko. 



= 

1 


1 


> 


•s" 




i 

li 
1" 


f 

ii 


Nuu ud iuhb» ol Ubrkiian. 


S 

1 
It 


as 

i 


Writioi.'. 

as": 

PrinUd.. 

PriDUd.. 

Writlm.. 


'i 

38,(na 
i.aoo 

JO 

48 
525 

an 

1J 

78 
«9 

28! 
325 

a 

300 
30O 

17* 

90 
9S4 

95" 

964 

250 

230 
28 
3S 

Z 
I 


SO 

"230 

£ 

"lis 

30 

1 

2 

i 

■ si 

■■■ao" 



"ao" 

20 


■■■«■ 

i 




150 22 

11 

"■moBl 

15 M 
ISO 

3 7B 

as 

■2600" 


25 60 
30 00 

50 00 


J 

45 


■■■"230" 

1. 


Ajn™. Mith 

J. R.K^;[m 

Pliilip Hnl»<T. KnordeloB ., 

A. Y.i,derHo«.HolUnd. R. D. 2... 

J. A. Gutdd. Hu<t»iiTi1k. R. D.2. 
Wn..A.Whitsty.jBn»M<.... 

fcJL:^;;:;;:.:::: :::: 

PrinripM, Li>boB 

Solon S. PuU. Niinlcg. 

T.I_ Norton. W.rt Olive 

Hn. Gn. ¥. Uanhill. Cogpon'illr . . . . 


S:::: 

&;;:: 

vS:; 

|::-; 

S:. 
S;:: 

s;;; 

|;::: 

Yn... 

y": 

I;; 

Ym. 

Sn,., . 

5::::: 
S:::: 


Y«. 

i: 


PrinlAl.. 








H-rilwi.:, 


■"■■am' 
100 

74 

"■556 

aoo 

200 

i 

100 


100 


Y«. 










■■" ■«■ 

1.320 
200 

ioo 

25 






WrilifliJ, 


ido Tinit. Vriwlanii'. ...,',; ! 

IVWr Hu)-«f. Jr..' Br«vmi9iii. . : . 
F.'lV«l.Hud<onvi11e.R.I).4... . 


On'l. 
No. 


..^. 


HogtnCily 

NnpolRjn n'hiUicr, Burl. R. D. 1 

KtSS-.**—: »-.■'■.■:■ 


lt«.k.- 




38 

10 
10 

■ 40 






Wnli™" 


250 


""is'w" 
is 00 

■ 4S0 
400 
220 
2S0O 

"1600 










lifiS" 


NtlHe Witkliimi. ChWDinc R. D. 5. 


i5r."" 


Bo4hV,:: 


J. F. Hnnrtf. niHBnmt R. D. .1 

Mithilda £. ZiniDRmin. Ution Cor. 

Ndiit"B;"KrkkV..:;;:::::::;::'' 

Rncy Cnncdiiii. »ti|;ina>. W. 3.. R. D- 

F.fMrKfnns.. ■.■.;;■"■;::■::;:::; 

Euimit Frnichwhn, niManiw 


Swr. 
0.n'!. 

N« Rnm. 






■■■■;so 










H.N«hur 

Id> M. HnWMrd, Sminnw. \V., R. D. B. 

Henry 0>Fiw, Fmlind 

Hmry Man»rlL Sngins". W.. R. P. 8. 




Wfrtm... 






laao 


1 


'.'.'^'.. 















D,j,,!,d:,COOgle 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
ftiWtc, School and Society Ltbraria in Michigan. — Contimukd. 



Counly «k1 Idcu™. 


X.™ of lUrwj. 


1 

■3 

1 


0-. 


i 

s 

1 


1 
J 
1 

i 


1 

1 


1 

1 


StCliirCO.: 








rimtl.tiiK 


Own... 
Own,.. 
Srhool. 
Sd»o] 


Tuiitioii.... 






SfUool 

.•School 


Inge 

1«9> 






Bo-JiE 




iMmilitim. 








School;::::; 










i»n 


1 


! 




Sfhoo! 

Bidknon Diitrid 






Br«kw.yl«™hip.... 






&;; 

Own;;. 






*.,.. 










rmulnliiiii . 
r>ral.ti[iE 






DW.S™.! 


....; sdBBi 












St,5-.";;..::::-:- 










itni 
ISV6 

IS» 


TQ-uiip... 


CiitiiUtac'. 
Cimibiin*., 




C«™i™T»iip 




T«..'fc^; 






eK^S" ; 
















gchool 


Both 


Sqi,,Si,».. 




CuMoo School 




gj^:'"™^ 






0„... 


Lib.iiia«r 












SjS.""** 


IH«.So.O 


Echwi:::::; 

sri 


iVc^lioK . 
' IMr««.'.; 


bwD. . ; 

OWD... 






























1899 
IMta 


»::;:: 




thrn... 

o-B..; 


t 






















ll>9ft 


*,»- 


"-" 















Eaft Gnmwood ^ - ■ 



FcrtCnlii 

Fat CrilH 
Onnxxd 



..| Diat.No.4 

J.;' iiyyK.Wili;:; 



KimbiU turn 
KJidbiL tt»n 



Rt.CburloBiulup,,, 
St. CliD towiiihip... 



Srhnol Own.. . 

Wchoul ' On.. 

UdmUb... OimiMfliil. C.H... 



i=,L.ooglc 



RBPOHT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OP SCHOOLS. 
Public, School and Society lAbraries in Michigan. — Continued. 



i 
1 

|l 


1 


1 


1. 

J 

a 

■B 


ii 

V 


1" 


1 


NUH ud tMnm o( Ulnmn. 


a 

! 


III 




BT 

1 

IS 

•f, 

w 

85 
IM 

845 

i 

•i 
» 

108 
I3D 

3a 

23 
42 

i 
■1 

80 
]« 

J 

US 

"S 

I 

15 


12 


"■■'s" 


036 

7 39 

:: 


30 
100 


30 




No 

£::: 

Y». 
Y«. 
Y«. 












































34 


S3 
























103 


110 




Y«.. 

Y»;"' 






10 


;;:::; 


S05 

250 










» 








TtMhtt. Dirt. No. 3, Unm. B. D. 3. . 






100 

20 

7B 


45 








No, 

Y«,... 
Ya.. 

Ko 

No.... 

1::: 

.Vo..., 
N« 

1" 
,:...„ 

No 

Ya... 

Ym. 

1- 

n"" " 
v«... 

yS;:: 












» 




17 60 


tji. Clur, G». Gurin 






" 


5S 






• 1 




















20 


■ 


8ra 






















5 

7 
14 

■"12" 



















80 
OO 
























M«iiEirt.M«iiii.k 






45 










8 71 
400 

"iooo 


M. J. BiitlH, HuiDt 0<y. R. D. 2. . . . 

Anna Buthr. Mirinr City, B. D. 3... . 
Ju. MurUt.UiriiK Cily 




WriltBI- 

PriBUd 


50 
130 

23" 


3fl' 

23 


KoGd». 






















10 

13 

i 

12 

'1 

11 
IS 


:.;:: 


300 

21 go 

12 IS 

27 00 
IS 00 

7 13 




42 








AUn ForUt. Port Htinn. R. !). 1 

^'oSScfABci^iii.:::..-. 

lowph Rrid. DiKclof. Avon 




t^m: 


02 
100 


02 
GO 


a: 














84 
12 


















48 

47 


SKflEJ*"-" 


.. 




"« 


700 




v^^. 


SSaJSKSS;.-." 


Boob, 










100 


« 


S-v&tJ'HSlf!"::- 


y«'... 

So. 
Ym. 
































' 




000 


10 


" 













i=,L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONBRS. 
Pvhlic, School attd Society Lxbrariea iii Michigan. — Continued. 



CuuDty iixl lDnti«]. 


NuH oC litrvy. 


! 

1 


0-. 


■1 


i 

1 

1 


1 


i 


6t. Clnir Co.-Cm. 




ISi 






Sdioo] 


FiuaAha 




















Cirtuliting. 












ItMU 


Own.., 


Co.Bm.... 






KflidiU School 




































"iSSiS: 








Circuliling 

CircuJatbif.^ 
Both. ,,•, 


K::: 

£;:: 






jfeS"™*" 


)ir<i^ti<^:ctoPub]i.: 


i 

ISU 


Fm public. 
Fm public. 


FlM 

Tu.ABnn 


"i>«y; 






White PipiioTo;t^ip,, 






Sanilnc Cb.: 


lib.™.. 






















SubKcipfn. 






lMn.No.3 ,.,, 


1(182 

1901 

19IK 

s 

1901 

iwi' 






Taiili™.., 

FiJ 

Finca 






LTJ^or"'": 


Both 


Own... 

&': 

ssi:: 

School. 


Dccj-. 




Public SrhoQl 

£i-.',;:Si;:::::: 

WhutlindTDWiithip..,.. 
W«rlh Township 






telS™"';:::: 


To»™hip... 


dmilaiinf.. 










Ehuwuan Co.: 


School. 

i?Cl:::::: 

(ichoiJ 

School 

Schnol 

Krh™l ,','.'!.. 
Udialib.. 
Bchool 

fct": 

i^clMOl 

Sfl 


OrcuUling.. 
CiTralatinB-, 

CimiLliuf.. 

CimiWhu.. 
























Fin» 








OUedo ■ (o™h 




O.T.::: 

o«B.' ! 

&: 


T«.lion ... 




ass ESSIE::: 


LTdiu'LibtVAiio'.'.;' 










Ks'itr'- 


^^ 












IMI 
18S0 






SSi'.::::::::::: :: 
Sfc",!*""': 






M:::::: 

School 


amilalmg.. 


&:: 




















Sa^t^;.-;;; 




K:-: 
S"': 




















School 

^SS!;:::;: 


m 


















IWI 






















-' 


m<tA 

Amic 

Rrhnol 


Bolh 

Bolh 

(VcBhrtiBg.. 

KSS::: 


Rnt. . 

fichnol.. 
Rnit.. 

"£:: 


8iib,4Gna. 




4 0w<m>. 










IS 

1901 


AwVfa,. 


Dmy- 









































5^. 



REPORT OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
PuWtc, School and Society Librariea in Michigan. — Continubd. 









1 




1 


f 

iS 

p 


N>[» .nd Mrm of lihrariu,. 


1 


-'•1 

III 




64 

S, 

St 
S3 

«eo 

100 

i:S 

1 
'■| 

J72 


34 

e 




18 30 

SOD 


300 






No.'.... 

va:;:; 












M 

300 


*' 








i 

1 




300 

40 00 

11 
























Uabcl Fiti. Umb 




Prinl*d.. 


400 
0.858 

,> 

350 

... 

DO 
S.i47 


IS 


Gr„>l. 


P'-irl 


Mm. M. E. Hkiiin. Mnrik.; 






H-hittPlBQB 


KnBn™. 




...!!. 




"^ 




K::: 

¥a.... 

■v™.... 

T«.. 

£:: 

No 

Y«. . . . 
Y«.... 

1: 

No.... 
No... 

!;:;■ 
s 

No...".. 

1 ■ 












John P. McCny. Mindoi City 

). C. R«Diii. Melvin 




PrinWd, 


-5 


„■, 


112 42 
300 


j»f. 




-400 


















71 

i 

i 

1.230 
S8 
300 

i 

i 

70 
3.M0 


6 




2E8 




















2K 
15 


ao" 


F. R. Po»m. Oi«J«i) 








500 






BocniH nippt. Byron 






i 

88 
2 

S 


8 


li 

WOOD 

"oooo' 




















i;3oo' 








Pri W" 


Haltir E. Holt. CoRinni. 
JoeUfloy 


Book. 




aoo 
so 


88 






S. J. Bnlt, Dunud 

.^nna Krllei'. Burlon. R. D. 1... . 
Zilpb. (-hiDbFrlun. FiiriilDg 


Hoolu 








so 


Booki. 




..! 


30 00 

soo 

10 00 
185 




:::•*: 








ThnrnM Mr.n. Lnrnon 






o.E.Firn,»ii.c«uiuiii. R.ai.::::: 

Ai>iiiH.r.ii>niun,HFndmc>n,R.a2. 


Book. 












a 

43 




lis 

05 00 


32 


so 


















3.388 

........ 


3D 












Printed. 


I.iKius E. fimiU 


nii.>kj' 




a> 


s 


12 00 


F. W. WhMton. PfrT>-. 

Mildifd Bfidgn- 

P™lWidko-,0.«-n. R.D. 8 


«->" 



D,j,,!,d:,COOglC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Ptiblie, S4A00I and Society LSmtriet in Michigan. — CoHTiNtiED. 



CounlF ud locMioil. 


Ktm ol libHT}'. 


1 

1 


Ow. 


i 

fl 
1 


i 
1 

1 


1 


i 

1 


Shi.-«w Co.~Con. 


Ilirt.Ko.3- 


iS 


la ; 






T11.& Smb. 






Rdmicc... 


M;; 

Own... 
Okb... 






es::;, 






sch^;::::: 


Rrfcnnce... 


School ATu 








18M 
1«00 




VtniM 










IS;:;:: 


Both 

n 


Own... 


Tu.A Sub.. 
Tax. A Sub. 




















Own... 

H:; 




''1^f_^ 




iseo 

im' 




BiwdniL School 










School 

S3?:-; 

UiimUb.. 










cii^iitki;. 








r 


s 

18BS 

ISM 

ism' 
iiies' 

1S90 

B 






HtntarA Sdiool 

KHkiTtmuhip 

LnwmiHScfaoiilUb.... 

TowMhip 

Miitl«»iin »hool 








Sch.boud.. 


















k™..;;:::: 


Rcfcrni 








Omibling.. 


Rfnl.. 












&*■; 


KSS;: 


R«v,;: 


Tui.tfinn. 
FunibofSo- 








BubiR*. 




Pine Grove Towmhip... 




School 

L>din Lib. 


Cimihting. 


S::: 

hTs;:. 

Schoii, 
Om.- 




















WtAlau" Co.: 




18W 
1897 


Sub.*&»<! 














M 

?i-s 


Birth..;:::: 


Tuition... 










■J Dexttr 




IS 
IK 

S 

18B7 
1N7 










L^™ 


sohooi:::::: 


RffwrtM... 














Dirt. No. 8, Ir 

niil. So. R 


T..Z 








LodLToinvdup 


Scbonl 


CUt^ibi- 




K.N'o.fl";.:::::;::: 


'-r- 








































Schml. 
Own., 










1SS8 


a*:- 


Cimihrtinl. 


Sutattipfn. 










IH>l.Ko.a. 


















1902 
I80S 






Own.. 






































Own., 

sS: 


Tantkni... 
T.<.««i.« 








S 


SSI:;::: 


SSSi;^- 

























rn Cily B»U. 



RR^RT OF COUNTT COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
Pubtu:, Sch/x>l and Society tAhToriet in Michigan.— CoNTumxD. 





1 


1 


1 


11 
if 


1 

1-^ 


1 

ii 


Nai« and tddm of kibraHiD. 


i 


111 




W 
120 

to 

11 

238 

'1 

«ao 

,'i 

m 

l.OOO 

1,301 
100 
95 

76 

■i 

so 

IBO 
TO 

1 

s 

70 

7S 














Y».... 

S:::: 

Y«,. , . 

V«..,. 

|::; 

yS..., 

£;■■ 

S::;: 

Y«.... 

S::: 
?t::: 

£;::: 

No."-*;;; 

I;;;: 

No. ... 

sT.... 

Yw. 
Y«. 

So. 
Ym.'" 

8;::; 






10 




110 00 












40 


w 












IS 








' 




i7 




















30 


18 








"> 












...... 


eoo 






Vmon. R.D. 2 






























20 00 
























WriBo,. 


82 
■1 


"'* 


SO 00 

41 10 

108 40 
125 00 
18 14 










PrinlBl 






Hn. Edith Blaalifitid. HuKord 






200 
















» 


4 


SO 








1,101 


700 








7i 


...... 


is 00 

7S00 


J,rtH,*M...™^ 






'■SS 


1.000 






Mn. CvTiii B. 3lnai»D, Fh Paw. .. . 
K.M.V«lrhd^K™l.aH.D.I 












. 


















1*5 










Nellie B,St«<ari, S-flavn 






S 


84 03 








C«d 


2.51S 




?l"»S;';5£"kTt;; 


r«,-i. 


WrilWl,. 


2S 


1 


aoo 
am 

28 00 


1.000 





















a 




















juiiui s;nilh. Cvi^ R.D.il 

Jay Smilli. Ana Arbor, R. D. 3;.... 












Wiioi 




,:':,". 




63 




ffi,„- 


■J."B:L.raw.y, 


No. 












































„.. , . 




























i,ii^ 


40 








2ii 




22 H 
























Frank FW*bw. YpriUoU 






45 








i7S 




































AU- B»ril 




Card. .. 
Cord-,.. 


m 


14 


'IS 


20,000 
sioOD 




iiJ|t«S.;,i;::::::;: 


K: 



i=,C.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Public, Sdiool and Society Libraries in Miehigan. — Coni 



Ci™i,lyaodl«sti«.. 


NuModLbnuy. 


I 

i 


CUn. 


i 


1 
1 

1 


1 


i 
1 
1 

















































































































gt.:::::: ::■ 




School 


Both 


,">"::: 


T.i.tioii 




Rpnnpi-flU 




Num-J. 


















W«[ord Co.: 




vm 

ISM 

IBM 
1880 






Own,:: 


Finn A Tii 








School 










Fin J ■■■" 






Odu Cretk Twp... 








CirtTiUling.'. 


(hn,::: 


TuBliOB.... 








U»8 














IBM 

ie» 










i5^i.ii°g:: 


0.11... 
' Rail... 

Own,:: 


































(iRHIWDad fwp 


s 

im 
istn 

IWS 

iste' 

IS 














?sSti, 












Sthodl 


OrnilDiinK-' 
a»yl.>ili.. 


Ovn... 
Own ,, 








t™...,,,. 








Tualion,... 

ts 




















Libwty Trp 


^Vtwp,;:::.::: 


Sr'' 


Cimlkiing.' 


&; 


















^^■fe.n.i.„:;:-.;::: 






























Vafoid Twp 


VoMT^M 

KS,f.,.::::::::: 

DLM. No. 3fr 


5 

1902 








iin™ 

Finn 

Si,:;. 









































m by SiJvBy Co. Uiutioi 



iinmwt., JKtjrtii 



Dignz.d by Google 



REPORT OP COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOLS. 
Public, School and Society LibraTies in Michigan. — Concluded. 



J 
1 

|i 


Ji 


Ji 




II 


1 

5 

li 

J' 


i 

ii 


NiiiitBiidxIdnaonibmiiK. 


3 

1 

k 
1^ 


111 




i 

318 

■1 

v> 

es 

IIT 

leo 

473 

,:: 

IS 


. '■ 


7 
6 


lie 00 






J, 8. Hot*. Dtubom. 
F. Cody. Ddrty. 
























1,475 




E. G. Vin Dmnttr. 






CKd. .. 




2 








100 


S 

10 

s 






















W.N.l*dl, PlymHid. 

G. W. Cordun, 3fi Hrcla Ave. Dtt'i.. 
Hu HcKmia WuudniRt 


Yo. 
Y«.... 

£:: 

Ya. 




PrinBd., 


49 00 

18M 


■j'.oob" 




Buokl. 
Bocllo. 




SSsr"^;:::;;- 






8 
40 

SO 

7* 

as 

14 




12 80 

4saa 

i 

47 00 
10 00 








WnCW... 


15 
















fe;; 

vi:;- 
1 

Y«,.. 

K::, 












S3 

K 

"166 


S3 








S.i.S:^,"-Ci. :::.:: ;: 




Card. .. 


Normiui HiJdy. Hinlon 

H. E. CmBinc. WncCord 


Nofino. 




w 




aooo 








f 

S« 

■■■■4S7 

070 


fto 

070 












000 
400 












^™h™;h1S^/,:;; ;:■;,::: 






15 

30 
3» 

"iso 




30 00 

34 SO 
104 30 
10 TS 

'4606 
2506 






s 

i 

Hn 




Card:/ 


Hm.C. Puu'dl, Hnick 

Mm. T. R««m, C.diBK. R. D. 2... 


Book.: 




Kir™--™-'------ 


NnBnn. 


WnlWi. 


0. D. Dnn. Sherman 


Y«. 



















D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRART COMMISSIONERS. 



THE METHOD OP DISTRIBUTION OF LIBRARY MONEY. 

The source of library moneja is, by Section 12 of Article XIII of tlie 
Constitution, as follows: All fines assessed and collected in the several 
counties and townships, for any breach of the penal laws. These floes 
are paid to the county treasurer by justices of the peace and circuit 
courts. 

By Section 4762 of the Compiled Laws, these fines are apportioned 
annually in the counties under the direction of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction and can be used for library purposes only. 

1. The several school districts of the state in their annual reports to 
the Department of Public Instruction state whether or not the district 
hiis a library and the amount of library moneys used for that purpose 
during the year. 

li. On the 10th of May in each year the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction sends a statement to each county treasurer, directing him to 
apportion the library money on hand in his county among the several 
school districts and townships that report school district libraries and 
township libraries. 

3. The county treasurer, before the first day of June, apportions this 
money to the several townships in his county, according to the number of 
children of school age in each township, as shown by the statement sent 
him by the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

4. The county treasurer pays the money to the township treasurer in 
each township, and then the director of each district, entitled to receive 
money, draws a warrant upon the township treasurer for the amount of 
money due his district, according to the statement sent him by the town- 
ship clerk. 

Id case a township library is also maintained, the money therefor is paid 
over by the township treasurer to the treasurer of the board of school 
inspectors. 

5. Every township maintaining a township library is entitled to re- 
reive a share of the money, provided all school districts in townships do 
not maintain libraries. If each district in the township maintains a 
school library, then there is no money apportioned for township library, 
as under the law, each school district maiutaining a library is entitled to 
draw from the township library its proportionate share of the books there- 
in, according to the number of children in said district. 

Note.— It has been (ound in some rountles that when laiye amounts of flnes have been collected 
the boKrd ol supervisors have directed the county treasurer lo transfer a part ot llie tine money to 
the contingent tiind, thus depriving school libraries ot what belongs to tiiem under the alatuie. Such 
action on the part oI the supervisors and county treasurer Is atisolutely illegal, as they have no 



D,„„.db! Google 



DISTRIBUTION OP LIBRARY MONEYS. 



TABLES SHOWING DISTRIBUTION OF LIBRARY MONEY. 

The following Btatistice, taken from the records in the office of the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, of money that has been appor- 
tioned to each township, and the number of books which have been 
purchased show an alarming discrepancy between the money received 
and the number of books bought. 

It is more than probable that an investigation would show that in many 
cases the money belonging to the township or district has never been 
drawn from the treasury. Several instances of this kind have been 
brought to the attention of the Board. Whatever may have been the 
trouble in the past, the remedy is simple; if a township or district main- 
tains a library, report it to the Superintendent of Public Instruction ; if 
a library is not maintained, organize one as quickly as possible and 
claim your share of the money from the township treasurer. If your 
shelves show 100 books in your library the Board will loan you the same 
number, giving on the start a good working collection. 

The statistics which follow show, in ronnd numbers, |I24,546.22 in 
1904, divided among the counties, and T5,S9U books purchased for town 
and district libraries. 

The cause of the unfortunate condition of [iflfairs shown by the statistics 
is the diversion of library funds from the purchase of books to general 
school purposes. In one county, for example, $144.58 was received and 
43 books purchased, the balance undoubtedly having been used for other 
purposes. On the other hand, many districts have purchased more books 
than the amount received would warrant, the money no doubt having 
been raised by entertainments, etc. 

On the whole, better conditions are shown than appeared a year 
ago. In most cases it is only necessary to call the attention of town and 
district officers to the necessity of using the fine money for the purchase 
of books as contemplated by the constitution. This is now being 
successfully done by the County Commissioners. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 
Library Moneys, 







«Co: 














*2l* 81 


mix Co.: 


IS BO 


•"; 


SK 










iMHins 
















SZi 


,ss 


















S£i 
























Xi::::: ::::;::::: 


7S0 




1747 15 


IwMfcily) 


IIMM 


S*«Kik. 








"Jt^ 


ea«a 




























»B»M 


*^«..: 
















CO] 


47 38 


^d'aiiZ'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. ■'■'■'.''..'.'.'. . 


^4 SO 








H8S79 


o. Co.; 

















iaS"-: 



LIbruy No.olVob. 



«ii CV),: 
























H-luwiCdtT) 












MAphG 


10 83 


PrsiTitvilif 


IJ7« 


Woodta^nd 

Vaukw SpnnDi . 


3at>3 




ti8»37 


"^k: 




Biy Ciiy (dirt 




















&£»;,:■■■■■- ■ 

















"ti^DO' 

ioeM' 



i.vL.oogle 



DISTRIBUTION OF LIBRARY MONEYS. 
Library mcm^a. — Continued. 



OiuEly ud lovuhip. 


Libnuy 


"i'* 


CDiiniy ud tovnahip. 


Libnuy 


'■^t-- 


BnuEN Co.~C«. 


tlfltS 


1 

1B2 


CHuunuxCo.: 










t3I24 






2at3 
■ "mm" 










'ff 




























11,023 21 


i.aio 




Hi 78 










BuNOiCo.: 


t2S52 

11 

24 OS 
20 SJ 

IS le 

68 39 


35 

'1 

I 

n 

20 

33 

SO 
























"KSSd"";; 






^•^- 


I43S71 


681 






g 






38 03 

MOO 

13 42 

Hi 


















EUu 




1^:::::::::;::::::;::: 


38 












t<13 3fl 

tllAS 

20 00 
«0 22 

II 

I2 2rt 
20 44 

JUS 

34 3S 

11 


284 












'^'wK^-' 


2 

i,oao 

!S 

11 

i 

12 






Albion WW) 
























^S.^^:- 


t«3e»4 


1.0U 


oS±°:;:::::::;:::::::::: 


11 

74 38 
44 21 

87 sa 

4105 
























TW„r„m™H 




&:::::::■::::::::::: 








L«oy 














SO 40 
640 SI 

!Sli 




















p^n&!u::::;;:;;;::::::::;;- 


n-^tfiih 

Cl*m Co.: 
C\an(ci^yi'.\'^V^'^'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 






Sl.m 63 




Ti*™iihi 






11,048 7s 


i,m 


110 37 


12 


'^^,'- 


mm 

"II 


1 

10 

73 

.20 


r. 


jS:^'""' 










42fl 
300 


































"^'•.'^■: 






(20 08 










?Si;i^;:::;:::::;::::::::::: 


27 M 


tZ19 




















77 93 








gSt!ii.v.:;:::::::;:;;::;;;::; 






»23iW 


Ml 


1 

IL-il, 












-X'"- 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Library money». — Continued. 



Couoly ond lownihip. 


LibBfy 


"idded- 


"TiS"^"- 


(79 78 

Si! 

« 

17 1 
43 1 

1V7 2 
19 M 




K 


22 




32 






81. J(*n.(rity) 


1^ 




104 





(723 34 


Ul 


SSlU'^L. ■::.::: ::;.::: 


53 




(20 (M 


63 


"■ffl-tn/ 


119 83 


7S 






B.yD«N«. 






Ktridirt;::::;::::;::;:: 

Cnitn 

Gl«drton((i.ilj) 


200 






si^-;::;::;;:;;;::;-:;; 


40 




MWM 


38S 


"S^'"-;-: 


J2I2J 




Im thwnabi («iy) 


98« 












m4 2i 


1.02fl 


^SiU'^r 


t71S7 

33 t» 
22 02 
11 
HOO 


« 


Bmlon 

SsSTv:: ::::::::::: 

Ctorlotle (rily) 

gr:::;::, ;:::,::„:,„: 

Ellon Rapid."(eL.))..::.. 


47 

IS 


ODFida 


IIS 
6 




»S«)M 


S81 


"KSii.. 






SSii,i»:::::::::::: : : : 


21 rs 


'5 



EyuBT C) —Cm. 

Cro» ViUacc. 

FriFn<khip 

LiltleblJ! 

Uipk Rivu...'::^ 

■ Ptt«kty (city).... 
neamnl Vie*.. . . 

Rfmrl.. ..".^^V,; 
Burlon 






[ Gr»«d TnivMii 



10 00 

"iiiB 

37fi60 
24 S8 



20 44 
32 09 
IIS 02 



3«09 
3112 99 



SOU 

23 B2 

,3S77 



DISTRIBUTION OF LIBRARY MONEYS. 
Library moneys.-— CotmnvsD. 





muBeyi. 


»._£^, 


County ini trntnihip. 


Ul™y 


No. of Vol.. 


"SS?.-:'^" 


II 

as 

Mtil 
•Mti 

WOT 


2V 
42 

S 


H™» Co,-C«- 




16S 






IS 
















40 










48 20 


20 




Iniu^ii Qi,: 




t224 7S 
188 00 

«8ia 

83 20 

■ WTO 

I,tt2 8D 

as 

186 S2 

sa 

176 m 
















73 




UUDkuhUI 




Wlwtkr 


l»«h™ 


28 




m2 73 


nti3 








772 




IS 13 
2063 

WU7 

II 

MM 
869 

IfiU 

JMIB 

irsd'oe' 


11 

39 
176 

33 

es 

H 








SO 














208 




























B2 

2fl 








""Si''"''' 


MOKOW , 


H.OOSOl 


2.884 




MTIO 
2S0t 
3«Z6 
29 76 
16 20 

lis 

S»40 
■ZOO 
116 22 

wot 

11 «6 
1S3E 

si 






10 


















EutOB 




WrigM 

Woodbridft 


23 




Jttl2 














tiwot 
s2Be 

271 2S 
3MIS 


■•i 

J7fl 
100 














24 




































12, 4M H3 












i.iiB 

33 
16 

X 

27 

1 


Iosco Co.: 




m7 33 




HcwR Co.; 


tlOH 




tiatoz 










17(16 
KS4 








&>"'■'"' 


Hsod 












UIU 












22« 
287 










[BOM Co.; 








1681 W 










»0II7 

Ik 
















Crs-riJ Fslb Scbiwl Dirtrict 












fll-. . t 


■k^ — 



REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRABY COMMISSIONERS. 
Library moneys. — Continued. 



«^— ,.. 


Libnrr 


No. of Voli. 
•ddtd. 


County ud townBhip. 


Libnrr 


"'Jld*- 


IROM Co-Cm. 


mm 


25 
8 


K...«.a,.: 


433 

3MS» 












.« 
















1S7 




M19 74 


6«7 






"•i 

20!0 


28 

i 

40 

sa 

i 

1 




















KiXT On,; 








K3S2I 












mo7 

14 62 

18 
34 

06 
84 

73 73 






""lis 78 

237 
2180 






KitSr'^"!".'^-:::::: 














































124148 


m 












"il 

3S20 
34 97 

7B98 

II 

31 SO 

ii 


37 

S! 

8 
11 














93 77 

72 60 

38 34 






NebuB... 








































28 37 

588 
53 34 

130 20 


































KlwiijiA* Co.; 






tl.05l 28 
40 50 




SoBBJort 


--- ■ 


























laoosa 


67S 


Lam Co.; 






(834 53 


75 


KiuHAioa Co.r 


K7 2g 
77 8B 

104 62 

'X 

■•is 
ii 

63 23 
£3 40 

104 10 


48 
6 

87 
' 2G 

40 

a 






ti«a« 






Una Co.: 






116 66 










t46 72 


















24 78 
11 64 

10 15 


























.88 

83S 

IS 














































»2,S70 43 


2.202 




14 44 





















DISTRIBUTION OF LIBRARY MONEYS. 
LS/rary mon«y$. — Contincbd. 



County and lowmJiip. 


LLb«ry 


'IdM. ' 


Coiintr ud towuhip. 


Lib»ry 


"•ir 


IS^::^-; 


10 78 

■If 


!fl 

1 


»„™..C: 


12 03 
46 

4*07 
































(230 27 


778 












'^'SZ.'"; 




IS 

1 


Hacoik Co.: 




UOOTfl 














lion 

eoz2 

13 79 

|i 

78 80 
43 3B 




























MSB 




















MSB 


224 
















«7 

17 
16 
120 

21 

en 

20 

1 
1 

34 












SlfXiS'""" 


S3 2A 

i!S 

in 32 

28 TS 
16 33 

Z7M 
IS 55 

&T, 

is 

13 (« 




59 




















WubinglM 

Mam™. Co.: 
Andia 

ffc:;;:::: ;:::■:■:;:,:;:: 












(443 21 








ItSl 
















^n 


HsDiitK 


05 25 
























gar::;::::::.::::::::. 






1343 9S 








n\^XU.;:': 


(581)2 
25 SS 

,5!! 

si 

220 07 
4 31 

a»aD 

4 31 
£8 




Brightor 


li 
11 

<iai 
IIS 

53 71 

11X39 

321 15 


10 
40 

1 

530 


Fociylli 


45 










0,n«y 

r.raM.."'.'.'.".' . 

Cif«r,0.i 

Hflmhurt 

H«.dy 


MSI^"«ic(Viij);.;::: 


10 






K^publir 














&v::;::;::;::::::::::: 


















Kr;: ;■ ■:..:::: 








LnoCn.: 






1 89 






""" 


630 












1 ^ 















REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY, COMMISSIONERS. 

Library moneys. — Contindbd. 



CamU mi tewnihip. 


Libnuy 


"•X* 


County ud bmndiip. 


Libruy 


"•.ffl* 


Minm Cd.— Cm. 


14 39 


1 

7 


Honn.! C<,~C«. 


lis 14 
1.289 13 


^ 








1l« 










43 






""ffir™"^^ 






I7M14 


178 


$1,480 24 


1.185 


MMonaCo.: 




8S 

1 

» 
30 

20 


11 97 

779 

li 

11 






• IW2S 

S»8S 

9U 

2 l» 
:0 23 

2 7S 
34 81 




'i 

1 
































T^ 














K 










49 0] 
37 05 

18 00 














2284 
t2m7S 




K) 








029 


83 


"^i:;^.'"-- 




SO 

IB 

120 
S70 








til M 

78« 

35 J5 

10 SO 






36 




M™«n<,N Co.: 
C;Mix.na 






48 




"IS! 






M 
















,^ 




laossi 


MiHfa^ (cily) 


3.750 OO 






J 
























(lOD 

13 « 


























380 


(3,940 28 










107 


t«ies 


48 


HtBunKU Co.: 




37 
NO 








397 














































M4I 


















460 


&::::::;::::::;;::;:■ 

s=: : 


IJM 


HoNun Co.; 




£0 

10 

20 

1 

24 


37 




(28 20 










23M 






^ 










IH95 
20 05 












:!k 













DISTRIBtmON OF LIBRARY MONEYS. 
Library moneya. — ContinckD. 





Library 


No.orVoli 


Coiutr uxl towuhlp. 


Libmry 


,._£*, 


°1GC^-^ 


tZ480 

127 90 
lOflO 

18 at 

13 66 


2 
55 

u 

i 

14 

I2S 

80 

30 

2 

9JI 




tl38 






















383 


































40 10 
17 87 

3180 
32 14 


K3 4fl 










110 18 




















830 
M74 
22H 


QiuooCd.: 






(11 22 






























1i 












38 77 
4G4 

5 71 

1787 83 




















(420 93 










110 90 

11 

9S 70 
30 91 

■■"mm" 

10 10 

48£ 
10 44 
58 07 
46 45 






























i 

i 

EO 

9 
















Holtand («ly) 
















































17 84 








ftwww Ittx Co t 

fc,::::;::::;:,::;;::::: 






1410 92 










Shrlby >. 


■■■■4Z8S 


tsano 

36 46 
^KSOTO 










flow 


J64 


48 


°lS5i£' . 


moo 


AS 
80 

40 


North AUii -. 

l*ulMki 

Rwren 

MiApy .* 

'bUIi Ri^.', 










118 






















13 GO 


tl4 IS 

27 97 






.- 




32.1 




OT 


^ 




13 SO 


Bninl 






W 






Cwnillwi 

!S£i., 




o^"C"- 




38 

"i 

10 






taco 

3149 






ars.""'"::::::::;::::: 


















9 41 




14 so 











REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRAST COMMISSIONERS. 
Library mortegK. — Continded. ' 



CDUsty ud Uwiiahip. 


Lilmrj 


NoofVob- 


Onuity uhI limiulilp. 


Library 


No^ol. 


Siain*w Co.— Coi., 


114 18 

8B2 


S 

MS 

38 

e 

20 


"S;-"";; 


ii 

18 40 
78 00 

100 12 

SSOl 

II 






Ka-. 


M? 










































72 




tl.lll B2 


1.5K 












IS 

11 


35 
W 

120 

12 

33 
3U 














































svr 
















105 S3 
84 63 








































8 8i 








3,274 




1 

17 «0 

22 25 
39 19 

II 

50 00 

14 32 










1108 


























J212M 


57g 








171 30 

22 87 






















jiil'tvnic;.';;;;::;:::::::.::;:: 










.2 




S32 


IS 

1 

29 
44 

1 






Antrim 










Cnlnicnk 


882 




43 




m 




MS 05 

32 98 

883 

33 03 

7 79 






ill 

210 5S 

10 25 

1135 
20 J« 








































ass.;:;:-.::::.::: 










V™rt 


!S 




as"- 


' r^ 






20 




lUHOG 









i,L.ooglc 



DISTRIBUTION OF LIBRARY MONEYS. 
LAnay moneys. — Concluded. 





IJbnry 


NocifVuli. 
»ldal. 


Counly >»d to-inship. 


Libn«T 


"•Jli"^ 


TwoLi C«~Cm. 


12 16 


1 
46 


w«»™« C-C, 


162 9S 
2SS6 

123 33 

1763 22 

11 

(11,870 36 
100 IS 










23 H) 




-1 








Wa.ki Co.: 






1,810 




(260 43 


418 
83 

S2 

113 
S7 

76 

1 

6 

36 




2017 
OS 17 

11 

WW 

row 

it 

38 82 








IM 




















EODBC..,.. 






17S 




gSUfc ■:■.:;■:.:;■ 


76 80 
00 04 

4131 

is 
li 

297 77 
$63:264 66 






































































8jglbH.ven (tHy) 
















t«47 

2WI no 

"A 

18 W 
402 

18 S2 


1.646 














S 

i 

26 
61S 






Wnmu Co.: 




^nn Arbor (rllj) 


11.046 




f40«38 
20 03 

74 78 






























i£2Sii«:.:..;:;::::;::.;:;:: 




« 








20 
















10 HO 




Ig 18 










Brio 


US6 2I1 


g«o 




48 BG 


T«UI 


1124.64622 















D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



• ••>r 



D,„„.db,Goo'^e 



'' SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIOIEES 



MICHIGAN 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 190S. 



LANSING. MICB. 
VIYHKOOP HALLENBECK CRAWFORD CO., STATE PRINTERS 



D,„„.db, Google 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIOIERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



RS little 



D,„„.db, Google 



State 

boabd of librabt cohmibsioners 

Lansinq Mich. 



Hk. Juub B, Pbtbb, asgiuBW, 

Presldenl. 
Ur. Hbnbt Hbiaoh Lodo, Au Sabtt 
Uk. B. H. pATTBHaiLL, Lansing. 
U>. David B. Bkikeuan, Detroit. 
Ubb. M. O, Spbncik LuislnK, 

SccretBiy. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

Saginaw, Michigan, January 1, 1906. 
Hon. Fsbd M. Warner, Governor of Michigan: 

Snt — I have the honor to submit the report of the State Board of library 
CotmnissiouerB for the year 1905. 

Very respectfully, 

JAMES B. PETER, President. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Four meetings of the Board of Library Commissioners were held during 
the year 1905, as follows: 

Detroit, January 20tb. 
Grand Rapids, May 25th. 
Saginav, September 9th. 
Detroit, October 28th. 

The act passed by the legislature of 1905 increasing the resources of the 
Board of Library Commissioners has given that body an opportunity to 
lai^ly extend the work in the State. At a meeting held at Saginaw, Sep- 
tember 9, 1905, a resolution was passed authorizing the appointment of a 
library organizer in this State, the salary and traveling expenses to be paid 
by the Board. The duties of this organizer will include a thorough canvass 
of the State of Michigan by counties, reports to be made on the condition 
of township, district and free public libraries; he will also gather statistics 
showing the use of public moneys collected from penal fines and apportioned 
by the Superintendent of Public Instruction, which should be used for 
library purposes. The diversion of these funds from their le^timate use 
to general school purposes has worked a great injustice to the, school libra- 
ries of the State, and the Board, in connection with the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, will endeavor to correct this evil. Acting under the 
above mentioned resolution Mr. Roy C. Lyie, of Grand Rapids, was ap- 
pointed organizer, commencing his duties the first of October, The short 
time intervening between that date and the completion of this report, has 
rendered it impossible for him to make a statement of any importance. 
Active operations, however, have been inaugurated, and the Board is justi- 
fied in feeling greatly encouraged over prospective results. The attitude 
of the people is more than friendly toward the establishment and support 
of hbraries. The evil has been wrought more by lack of thought and ap- 
preciation, than by any intention to disregard educational advantages. 

At this meeting the Board also provided for four library institutes to be 
held in the State during the present fiscal year. This work will be done in 
connection with the State Library Association, which will arrange the de- 
tails of all institutes. The work will be carried out under the general super- 
vision of the Board of Library Commissioners, and the attendant expenses 
will be paid out of the appropriation under the control of the Board. 

In a general way there has also been planned for the coming year the 
introduction of elementary library training in the county normal training 
schools and the county teachers' institutes. It is thought by the Board that 
training of this kind will reach the teachers in the rural schools, who have 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY C»MMISSIONERS. 

charge of the district libraries. It is hoped that the pl»n will result in the 
encouragement and strengthening of libraries in the rural districtB. 

liie following institutes have been attended this year by a representa- 
tive of the Board of library Commissioners: Eaton Rapids, New Balli- 
more, Newaygo, Ithaca, Ionia and Elmira. At these institutes an exhi- 
bition was made of the traveling libraries, loan collection of pictures and 
books for children. The interest awakened by this work and the imme- 
diate results shown in the applications for books and pictures, have demon- 
strated to the Board the advantages to be gained by following this plan. 

The friendly activity and enthusiasm of the county conmiissioners of 
schools in connection with this work has been most gratifying to the Board, 
and fruitful in results. The work of hbrary extension has been taken up 
by them in the most enthusiastic manner. Their influence and their efforts 
in behalf of the proper use of the library moneys have been made evident 
by the large increase in the nimiber of books purchased. The demand for 
book lists from the State Library has also shown an intelligent appreciation 
on their part of the necessity of raising the standard of the books purchased 
for the rural schools. 

The co-operation of the Women's clubs with the Board of Library Com- 
missioners is proving to be one of the strongest factors in Ubrary extension. 
The club women of the State have taken hold of the work with interest and 
inteUlgencfl, and through their active efforts a large number of travehng 
and registered libraries ba^'e been placed. The great demand for these* li- 
braries has proved the efficacy of the work being done by the clubs working 
under the direction of the library committee of the State Federation. The 
reports from this committee will be found on page 13 of this report. 

The attention of those interested in library work is called to the excellent 
paper on "PubUc libraries" written by Prof. W. F. Lewis, of Port Huron, 
read at the meeting of the State Association of Teachers, and embodied in 
this report. 

Mahy C. Spenceh, Secretary. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



NOTES FROM THE STATE. 



NOTES FROM THE STATE. 



The following library buildings have been given by Mr. Carnegie eince 
last report: Mendon, Portland and South Haven. 



After dallying over the remote prospecta of a Carnegie library for several 
years, the city council has finally accepted the tender made by the Ladies' 
Library Association and will make a free public library of that institution. 
An appropriation of $300 has been made for its maintenance for the first 
year. 

BATTLE CREEK. 

The new Charles Willard Memorial hbrary was opened to the local public 
April 27, 1905. The structure cost about $80,000 and is one of the finest 
in the State. It was bequeathed by the late Charles Willed. 



The Carnegie library was opened September 18th, and the people given 
their first opportunity to inspect the new building. The cost of the build- 
ing is $25,000. 

GRAND HAVEN. 

The council has accepted a $12,000 library building, the joint pft of 
Webster Batchelter and Andrew Carnegie. It was voted to place It on the 
lot adjoining the new federal building. 

GRAND RAPIDS. 

TTie Ryerson Public library has received the following valuable gifts: 

James S. Barnett, 92 volumes of rare books. 

Burridge D. Butler, a collection of children's books to be known as the 
Winnie Whitfield Butler collection. 

George G. Booth, Detroit, 6 books from the Cranbrook Press — life of 
Abraham lincoln by John Locke Scripps. 

Mia. Dryden, books on furniture. 

Hon. Charles W. Garfield, collection of agricultural publications. 

Historical Society to present its collection. 

Mr. John S. Lawrence — maps showing knowledge of America by early 
geographers. 

Mrs. Ehas Matter, 25 bound volumes of Scientific American. 

Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, valuable books on Egypt. 



The public library at Hancock has been increased by a consignment of 
300 books. The hbrary has been steadily growing and now numbers about 
3,000 volumes. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Mr. and Mrs. B3m)ii A, Finney has presented the public library with 90 
volumes of Harper's magazines covering a period of 52 years. 

IKON MOn^TAIN. 

There are 6,891 books in the public library according to the report of 
the secretary. During the year 1 ,092 books were purchased, 

KALAMAZOO. 

The library of the Kalamazoo college has received another valuable col- 
lection of books from Hon. A, M, Todd, Many of the collection date from 
the infancy of printing, 

LANSING. 

The Camepe library was dedicated in this city February 22d. Mrs. 
M. D. and Floyd M. Chatterton have presented the hbrary with 30 volumes 
of Abbott's "Makers of History" and steel engravings of Abraham lin- 
coln and Justice Thomas M. Cooley. 



The new Carnegie library was dedicated April 28, 1905. The cost of the 
library, was J35,000. 

MASON. 

The Ladies' Library association, an organization that has been in exist- 
ence in Mason for the past twenty years, has disbanded and presented its 
books to the high school library. There are over 1,000 volumes, and 
they will be used as a public library in connection with the books at the 
school building. In all there wilt be nearly 2,500 good books. 



For years past the village of Mendon has kept up a collection of over 
5,000 volumes housed in two rented rooms, but covering a large circula- 
tion. Commissioner David E. Heineman of the State Board of Library 
Commissioners became acquainted with the situation, and laid the facts 
before Mr. Carnegie. As a result Mr. Carnegie has offered the village 810,000 
for a library building. 

PORTLAND. 

Mr. Samuel E. Jarvis, of Lansing, has offered three lots in Portland as a 
site for a $10,000 Came^e library. 

TRAVERSE CITY. 

The Carnegie Ubrary was dedicated March 10, 1905. The building cost 
$20,000. 

Mrs. J. G. Ramsdell has donated to the library 294 volumes from the 
library of the late Judge Ramsdell. 



l.;>L.OOglC 



REPORTS OF REGISTERED LIBRARIES. 



■s 

1 






J 












-pnoqA, 


i;S 


Si SSi 


iS 


; iss sasss :a 


11' S :^ 


M ;§;§; 


1 






:1 












^ 


■ 1 

;ii 


M :,l 

in! 


^1 












■3 


















■amaoKKiioj 




i; iS 












■pjppSBtimiD,^ 


M" 


:" 














-lovjoBtioinM 


: :2 


i; iS 


:g 












1 
1 


i 


i; i* 
1: if 


; : 

r ' 


.3 ; i 

1 
ill 




M Ml 

li 

iitt 




jiiiiy 

illll 



REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 






.■Sal -ii<| 



l:i^ 



ij 



ij 



;|1 



ii=..J III* : 



^^ III :; 




, Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF UBRARY COMMISSIONERS, 
Loam made to Regittered LAnxnet, 1905. 



Hunt of libni?. 




Omilttin. 


No. of 




100 
ICO 

■a 

100 
100 

i 

ID 
GO 

S 

100 
100 

100 

100 

B 

100 
100 

lOO 

100 
100 
100 
100 

100 
100 

1 

100 
100 
lOO 
100 
100 
100 

im 

100 
100 

100 

100 
!00 

so 

100 

100 
100 
100 

100 

100 

100 


Nonpotl. 

"•^ 

Nonport. 

Hoi™!; 

W 
Nongrt. 

101 
N« report. 

137 
«o report. 

«'".r 

».^ 
"•# 

ff 

Nonport. 
440 

!s: 

236 

No report. 

No report. 
No report. 




























- 












feffi-'"-*:;;;:;-::;;:::::::::::;::;;:;;:::::;::;:::;;::;::;::::;::;:: 








































































itSlk^M^^T'':*-;::::::::::::::;:;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


St 






































































































































wiiHViirtsibooi'//.';;";^:^';;::;^:^;':^' ■"■■"■■■' ■■^■■■^■■^ 








- 


8,700 


i,!m 


<:*3» 





MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



REPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE OF THE STATE FEDERATION OF 
WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Josephine C. Priest, Detroit, Report, 

No library extension work having been done in the lat Congressional 
District until the present year it was found necessary to begin at the foun- 
dation and organize for the wbrlc. Your member, accordingly, at the first 
meeting of the D. F. W. C. appealed to the federated clubs of Detroit to 
appoint library committees in their several clubs, and asked that aggressive 
work be done along the lines of library extension. Literature relative to 
the work was mailed to each of the 30 clubs in the Detroit federation. 
Eight clubs manifested their interest in this branch of State federation 
work and appointed library committees, some of one, others of two or 
three members. 

The city was districted and each local committee waa given her territory 
in which to work. 

It was late in the spring before all the committees were appointed so that 
very little active work was accomphshed during the summer months. Three 
meetings had been called in the meantime to report progress. 

During September the Twentieth Century Club succeeded in establishing 
travelling libraries — one at Wm, H. Allen & Co., 285 Lafayette Ave., and 
another at the St. Clair Manufacturing Co., 4052 Porter St. 

Hypatia .Club established one at the Michigan Central Railroad Branch 
of y, M. C. A. at car shops. 

Sorosis Club placed two — one at the Finck Overall Factory on Gratiot 
Ave., and one at the National Biscuit Co., Woodbridge St. 

The Jewish Woman's Club and Zetema who work in unison have estab- 
lished two — one at the Independent Cigar Co. Factory and one in the United 
Jewish Charities, cor. Forest and Hastings streets, known as the Hannah 
Schloss Memorial Building; this latter Ubrary is to be used for a boys' club. 

Your member finds it rather difficult to get the club women to reahze 
that their home city is a field where much may be accompliahed in estab- 
lishing Ubraries — they tell us that there can be no need as we have a Cen- 
tral Public Library containing nearly 200,000 books, and that we now have 
six branch libraries with a daily delivery to and collection from each branch 
— also that the circulating library books as used in 73 public schools of the 
city is increasing every year, as their use is steadily growing in favor — so 
that it would seem that Detroit is highly favored in regard to free public 
library books and that there is no crying need of State work to supply 
reading matter. 

But your committee finds that there is a field for work here, and that 
after the club women become more familiar with the work they will be able 
to do it more effectively, and indeed they are already laying larger plans for 
the coming year. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORTS OF LOCAL LIBRARY COMMITTEES, FIRST CONGRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 



The district assigned to Detroit Sorosis (from Woodward Ave., east to 
the city limits and north to Gratiot Ave.), seems qttite well supplied with 
libraries. 

Have written the National Biscuit Co. but have not succeeded in placing 
a library, as the manager seems unwilling to assume any responsibility as 
to loss of books. 

Have plad^d a set of books in Finck's Overall Factory. They are used 
by only a small proportion of girb as so many are foreigners. 

Stevens' Laboratory has a library for use of employes. Parke, Davis & 
Co. also have a library. Tlie Hurlburt library at Waterworks Park is 
liberally patronized. The public schools seem to be supplied with plenty 
of reference books and stones of an instructive character. 

Elmira Abthub, Detroit Sorosis. 



The district assigned to the committee of the Twentieth Century Club of 
Detroit, is as follows: Woodward Ave. west to city limits, Michigan Ave. 
inclusive, south to river. 

Two libraries have been placed by this committee, one in the Wm, H. 
Allen Co. (manufacturers of the Alain petticoats). The employer and em- 
ployees are well satisfied with the libraries. 

The committee made two visits at this factory and each time had an 
interview with Mr. Allen and the forewoman, Mrs. Roade. 

Although they have no regularly formed club, the girls have named them- 
selves "Tne Alain." 

The library Is well patronized, especially the books of fiction. 

The St. Clair Mfg. Co., 40 and 52 Porter St., have just received their first 
library, but already state that it will find favor with the employees. 

Two visits have been made at this factory. 

H. R. Stoepel, 330-332 Lafayette Ave., was visited three times, the com- 
mittee found the employer and manager willing to have a library placed, 
but the non-Interest- of the employees, did not guarantee subscribing for it 
just at present, however the manager has promised his co-operation and we 
hope to soon place the library. 

In every instance the employers and managers have shown a great interest 
and willingness to have these libraries placed in their factories and it has 
been a pleasure to visit the aforementioned institutions. 

The American Lady Corset Co, was visited, but failed to place a library. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Stella F. Bhitmue, Chairmanjip 



MICHIGAN STATE -FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 15 

The Zetema and Jewish Woman's Clubs have worked together in estab- 
lishing traveling libraries within their jurisdiction and librariea have been 
placed in the following centers: 

Independence Cigar Company, Hastings St. and Forest Ave. 

Moebe & Co., 652 Hastings St. 

W. M. Finck & Co., 1156 Gratiot. 

Try Square Club, Jewish Charities, 239 HighSt. E. 

Fred Bossenberger, 249 Gratiot. 

Attitude of employers is favorable to the work. 

Five visits made and five librariea have been placed by the committee. 
Lbtta Robinson, Jewish Woman's Club, 
Isabella Mackat, Zetema, Club, 



Representing the Hypatia Club of Detroit, up to the close of the year 1905 
I have placed one Ubrary of 62 volumes. It is located in the Michigan Cen- 
tral Car Shops, and is in charge of the Railroad Y. M. C. A. It was located 
in order to make it accessible to men who do not frequent the Y. M. C. A. 
building near by. 

How well tt is appreciated is shown by the report of the librarian in charge, 
and submitted to me yesterday, as follows: 

"Library opened for shopmen November 24, 1905. 

"Volumes — English, 50; German, 12. 

"Number drawn to January 12, 1906; English, 44; German, 18. 

"Notes: We can use several volumes of good German fiction. A brief 
history of Germany. Bayard Taylor's history of Germany. (Eng.) 

"Robinson Crusoe in German. Any good German books for parents to 
read to children under fifteen years of age." 

I am much pleased and encouraged with the above report of the librarian, 
evidencing that my first library is well placed. 

As the territory assigned to me is limited, I have not found it necessary 
to make many visits, perhaps half a dozen in all. 

The attitude of employer is generally favorable. 

The employees who are using the one library established could not well 
be more interested, as they are certainly making more use of the books than 
was anticipated. Respectfully submitted, 

InA HoLDEN, Hypatia Club. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 

Mias Mary S. Miller, Adrian, Report. 

Of the 25 clubs in my district, 12 have appointed library committees. 
Six only, of these 12, responded in any way to the last set of questions sent 
out. Every one of these six answered the questions: "Could traveUng 
libraries be used to advantage in your township or district libraries," and 
"Name localities where libraries are most needed," with the words, — "Do 
not know," or "Am not able to say," showing plainly that the committee 
had failed to do the work mapped out for it. 

I prepared and sent out circular letters to the editors of forty-six news- 

gapers in my district explaining the purposes of the Federation Library 
ommittee, and asking them to print, free of charge, both the letter, and 



16 REPORT OF BOARD OF UBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

my report of the work accomplished last year. I do not know how largely 
this was done, further than that the article appeared in the two Adnan 
dailies. 

At Mrs. Spencer's suggestion I wrote the school commissioners of Monroe, 
Lenawee, Jackson, Wayne and Washtenaw counties, asking their hdp in 
the work. I received no reply from any of them except E. W. Yost, 
of Detroit, who sent me a directory of the Wayne county district schools, 
with the names of the teachers of the same, specified those localities where 
library facilities were the poorest, and offered to help me in any way within 
his power. 

I sent all circulars issued by the library committee to every club in the 
district, as well as the letters of Mrs. Felker, and Mrs. Custard. Have failed 
to elicit sufficient information in return to enable me to place a single trav- 
eling library, or even to know the condition of a single district library. 

I have sent copies of our circulars to the officers of the new Lenawee 
'County Federation of Women's Clubs, formed last spring, asking them to 
consider the claims of library extension in planning their future work. I 
shall also ask the opportunity of addressing them upon the subject at their 
next meeting, as I feel that here, perhaps, may be an apportunity for a more 
successful prosecution of the work than has hitherto l»en possible. 

I regret that I am unable to present a more encouraging report, but have 
thus far been unable to stir up the club women to any active interest and 
participation in the work, . 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



Hudson, Mich. 

It gives me pleasure to report our infant library, dedicated March last, in 
a most flourishing condition. 

The building and equipment represent an "expenditure of S13,500, exclu- 
sive of books. We have 3,000 volumes, about one-quarter being fiction. 

Donations amounting to $1,750 were received last year, the Woman's 
Literary Club giving S25. The one-mill tax gives us an annual income of 
$1,900. The library is a free public Carnegie library. The building is of 
field stone in artistic design. 

I find that the penal fines here collected go into the contingent fund and 
are therefore not used for library purposes. 

I am unable to report any special work done by our committee or to give 
you any information in regard to district schools. 

Florence Frensdorf. 

Hudson, Mich. 
I have been authorized by the Friday Club to inform you that there has 
been no library committee appointed this year. The outlying districts 
have taken advantage of the Carnegie Library in this city and while aa 
individuals we have done much, as a club we have done nothing beyond 
buying for the library a fine electric clock. 

Yours sincerely, 

Mrs. H. B. Brims, Sec, F. C. 

Jackson, MicK 
The Amaranth Club last year took no part in the work of the library 
extension committee, except that we made a very great effort to place on 
,the shelves of our new Carnegie library a history of the Philippine Islands 
from 1493 to 1898, publbhed by the Arthur H, Clark Co., Cleveland, O. 
In this we failed and since we were unsuccessful at home, scarcely cared 
to extend our efforts farther. 

Respectfully yours, 

Emma Connelly. 

Jackson, Mich. 

Our Mosaic Club has no committee for visiting district schools and we 
have no way of finding out the state of their libraries. 

The school in Summit township has a good Ubrary and in good condition. 
This is the only one that I can report on to you at the present time. If 



18 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

we find out any facts of interest in regard to any of them I will let you know 
later. Sincerely yours, 

Adgdsta Waldbon, Cor. Sec. 

Jackson, Mich. 
The Athena Club have not taken up any library work this year. 
Very truly, 
Mrs. W. F. Cowhane, Ex-President Athena Club. 

Jackson, Mich. 
The matter of appointing a library committee was tabled last year and 
nothing has been done about it so far this year as there is very little of that 
kind of work to be done, where we have so many clubs in the one town, 
unless there could be some system about it so that the same ground should 
not bo covered twice; especially as every locaUty near us has a good library. 

Hastily yours, 
Twentieth Century Club. Miss Harhiet Brown. 

Jackson, Mich. 
There is no Library Committee in the Tuesday Club. 
Sincerely yours, 

Ladba H. Ford. 

North ville, Mich. 
I had caused no report to be sent to you of a Ubrary committee for the 
reason that none was appointed, no one seeming to be willing to act. Our 
local library conditions are somewhat unusual, as the public library is owned 
by a private association of ladies and does not come under the required head 
as I understand it. 

Della F. Harmon, Pres. Woman's Qub. 

Tecumseh, Mich. 
The Research Circle Club has never had a library committee, not because 
of indifference but because there are adequate library advantages in our 
own town. ^ most excellent one is sustained by the school district, which 
the ladies of the town started years ago and handed over their work and 
possessions to school district if they would m^ntain a free public library. 
This library is patronized by the surrounding country. 
Yours, 

C. A. Sawyer, Cor. Sec. 

Wyandotte, Mich. 
Replying to your postal asking for a report from the Ubrary committee 
of the Wyandotte Tuesday Study Club, would say we do not go into the 
work at all and have no such committee. 

Anna E. Clare, 



Sec. of Tuesday Study Club. . , 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 19 

Ypsilanti, Mich. 
Your note asking for informaUoa about library work in the Literary Club 
has been handed me by the former president, Miss King. 

I do not know of any hbrary work that ha^ been done by the club. In 
fact I think this must be entirely new as I do not remember of any former 
communications along these lines. Kindly advise me if you wish anything 
presented to the club. 

Claea Vanpobsen, Pres. L. L. C. 



THIKO DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Gertrude B. Prindle, Chariotte. Report. 

Number of federated clubs, 25, 

Number of federated duba that appointed local committees, 10. 

Of these five have made report of library conditions. 

The Woman's League of Battle Creek contemplate placing libraries in 
the rural schools. 

The other clubs only examined the condition of libraries in their immediate 
towns. The chairman had a full notice printed in the city paper, calling 
attention to use of .the proper funds for hbrary purposes and asked outside 
papers to reproduce* it. 

A number of dubs were visited throughout Eaton county, and the matter 
of better library conditions urged. 

As a general thing the library funds are diverted from the proper chan- 
nels, llie libraries in the district schools are very small and do not p^w 
much. The books aJready in use were generally bought with money raised 
by entertainments, etc. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD- OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORTS OF LOCAL UBRARY COMMITTEES, THIRD CONGRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 



The library committee of the Charlotte Century Club has endeavored to 
improve the tone of the city library, suggesting that the best class of fiction 
be kept upon the librarian's table in easy access of patrons. 

There have been a number of visits made in different grades of the public 
schools. D. Louise Smith. 

E^aton Rapids, Mich. 
Have found one small library in the Smith District. There are about 40 
volumes, about two-tMrds of them are fiction and in a very good condition, 
kept in a farm house. Bought with money from socials. 
Sincerely yours, 
LiDA W. Slocdm, Ladies' History Club. 

«• Eaton Rapids, Mich. 

The Ladies' History Club, of Eaton Rapids, have a library committee but 
they do not seem to have ever done anything. 

We have an excellent city library, and we have never attempted any 
work in the country, have never seen an opening. 
Sincerely yours, 

Gertrude Hobart, Sec. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 
We have no local library committee and there does not seem to be much 
opening in our county for starting libraries, as most of the clubs have their 
own, and are within easy distance of our fine public library, beside a fine 
reference Ubrary. We do not give any report at all of new work in Kalamazoo 
county as to libraries. We have turned our greatest effort of late toward 
civic work. Sincerely yours, 

Florence G. Mills. 

Kalamazoo, Mich, 
The Twentieth Century Club has no library committee, and consequently 
there is no report to send. Very sincerely, 

J Mrs. D, a, Harrison, Cor. Sec. 



i.vL.oog[e 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



Marehall, Mich. 
I do not think we have a local library committee. I never heard of one. 
We have no public library, but a school library containing both reference 
and fiction open to teachers and scholars, and a Ladies' Library Association, 
one year's subscription being $1.00, Contains about 4,500 volumes. 
We are greatly in need of a good public library. 

Amelia F. Redfield, 
Cor. Sec. Monday Club, 

Quincy, Mich. 

I hear through Charlotte parties that you would like to know about our 
little library. We are not incorporated but are kept alive by the efforts of 
three ladies. We are eight years old and have seven hundred volumes. 
We have fifty centa a year for the use of the books and five cents a sin^e 
book. Last fall we had a "rummage sale" and made enough to put on the 
shelves The New International Encyclopedia for club work. 

The rent of a room in the rear of the State Bank is donated, hence our 
prosperity. 

We have on hand a hundred dollars, and buy the new books about as 
soon as published. Mrs. M. S. Segus, Prea. Mrs. C. H. Houghtaling,Vice 
Pres.; Ife. W, 1. Barnes, Sec, and lilrs. W. H. Lockerby, Treas. I am 
librarian just now to save expense. Yours truly, 

DcELLA'J. Sbgus. 



FOURTH DISTHICT. 

Mrs. Ella S. Custard, Mendon. ' Report. 

The member from the fourth district respectfully submits the following 
report for the year ending October 1, 1905. • 

Of the 23 federated clubs in the district, 20 appointed committees or 
library secretaries during the first year, 12 reported library conditions in 
their respective towns, asking for further instructions, but when they were 
directed to go QUtside their city limits most of them reported inability to 
go; some were silent ever after. A few clubs held nobly to the work. One, 
the Thursday Club of St. Joseph, took up the work last spring, pledging to 
care for a traveling library. "The work is being nobly done under the lead- 
ership of their president. 

Circular letters, printed matter and personal letters have received little 
attention. Newspaper articles have accomplished little. More has come 
from personal appeal. I doubt the advisability of the reading in clubs of cir- 
cular letters. 

Traveling libraries placed, four. 

One in district No. 2, Mendon. 

One in Arlington Club. 

One near Hastings, and one at Baroda in Berrien county. 

Free Public Library established at MarceUus through the work of a few 
ladies of the village, assisted by the district chairman. 

Mendon rejoices in the erecting of a fine $10,000 library building from 



22 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

the Carnegie fund. The citizens are grateful to Commissioner Heineman 
for his assistance. Sturgis and Hartford are working for the gift. Three 
Ejvere, Benton Harbor and St. Joseph have fine new Carnegie buildings. 

Libraries registered during the past year: 

Hartford Ladies' Library Association. 

Lawrence Township Library. 

St. Joseph Hollywood Library. 

The library loan of 100 books has been reported from Benton Harbor, 
Lawrence, Edwardsburg and Marcellus. 

Library extension was given a place on the St. Joseph County Federation 
program last April. The subject was discussed by Mrs. Felker, president of 
M. S. F. W. C, the fourth dutrict chairman and a member of the Mendoa 
Woman's Club. Much interest was shown, two clubs promising to take up 
the subject and give it a place on the club calender for the coming year. 

Three county commissioners have expressed interest in the work. Mr. 
Ketcham, of Hastings, has' pledged to assist in Barry county. Mr. Hale, of 
Calsopolis, sent a list of teachers' names where libraries were needed, "rhe 
use of Ubrary money has awakened some discussion, some clubs declining 
to agitate the question. 

The district member is working for a children's hour in the new building 
in Mendon. We wish the use of a room where we can interest the young 
in the use of books; we have a plan that is working weU so far and we hope 
that there will be a knowledge of the value of reference books — and a love 
for books which are not classed as fiction. 

Your district member has found that personal work will accomplish more 
than anything else. 

We have whole townships where there is neither club, library nor high 
school to be found. Who is to go to these people and teach them how to 
take advantage of the library aids afforded by the State? 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Emma K^endrick, Grand Haven, Report. 

Was appointed late in the year so the report is limited. Appointed one 
committee, Mrs. F. C, Clapp, Grand Haven, Mich., who has done some work. 



Dignz.d by Google 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



REPORT OF LOCAL LIBRARY COMMITTEE, FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 



Grand Haven, Mich. 
- The Woman's Club of Grand Haven received a traveling hbrary on China 
in September, 1905, Not much use has been made of said library as it is 
something entirely new. 

Grand Haven's Public Library consisting of some fourteen hundred vol- 
umes of history, biography, travels and adventures, natural science, law, 
political economy, social science, religion, philosophy, poetry and the drama, 
orations, essays, speeches, literature and language, art and fiction, books of 
reference and public documents, is controlled by the school board. 

The library contains no objectionable books. New books are carefully 
selected each year with especial attention given to the juvenile department. 
Very truly yours, 
Mhs. F. C. Clapp, Woman's Club Lib. Com. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Augusta D. Barnes, Howell. Report. 

The outlook for library extension in the Sixth District is very encouraging 
and quite a noticeable improvement since last year. Ladies libraries are 
maintained in the following places. Uowell, 1,300 volumes; Birmingham; 
Rochester, 1,200 volumes; Pontiac. Came^e libraries at Lansing, Flint 
and Howell. The Lansing school library of 15,000 volumes is housed in 
the $35,000 Carnegie building. The Flint Carnegie library contains 7,828 
volumes. 

The Howell Carnegie library building is nearly finished; and the ladies' 
library will turn over their 1,300 volumes as soon as the building is com- 
pleted. It is counted the finest building in Michigan for the cost, $15,000. 

Federated clubs using State travehng libraries made up especially for 
clubs: Howell, 1; Flint, 2; Williamston, 1; Pontiac, 1. 

The Rochester club makes frequent use of the Detroit Public Library. 
The Leslie E. 0. T. C. club has 305 volumes and raise about $25.00 each 
year for new books. This library is free to club members, but outsiders pay 
a small fee. Leslie also has the Tabard Inn hbrary. Lansing has State 
library. Agricultural College library, school library, one branch library and 
^ade traveling libraries. Your committee has placed three traveling libra- 
ries during the year, as follows; Howell Farmers' club, Osceola Grange, 
Hamburg Farmers' Club. A State traveling Ubrary is abo in use in the 
Renadilla Farmers' Club. We are making every effort to keep the hbrary 
moneys in the proper channel. 



i,>L.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORTS OF LOCAL LIBRARY COMMITTEES, SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 



Birmingham, Mich. 
I have tried hard to get a traveling library in several places but as yet 
have little encouragement. Our own ladies' library is alive and that is all. 
I am working hard to place that on a firm foundation. I have little en- 
couragement along these lines. I wish you would write to a Mrs. Cummings 
at Franklin. It is a little place — 150 or 200, and just the place that needs 
it. Hope to give you better news. Truly, 

M. Baldwin. 

Flint, Mich. 
We have a beautiful Carnegie Library. Library conditions in the rural 
vicinity are good. Two traveling libraries have been used here for several 
years. The Columbian Club have had books from the State Library at 
Lansing. In the Carnegie Library here we have 7,828 books and expect a 
few new books. Mrs. G. S. Countryman. 

Howell, Mich. 

The L. L. and R. A. have not added as many books as usual. The 
library has 1,300 volumes; 20 new ones this year. It will be turned over 
to the Carnegie. 

The school library has 1,400 volumes and about 100 added this year. 

Leslie, Mich. 

As to our library, the E. 0. T. C. Club have 305 books free for club ladies. 
Outsiders pay five cents. We have no State traveling library. Our 
school has 575 volumes for their use. I know nothing about Farmers' 
clubs. 

They raise 25 or 30 dollars every year to buy new books; the club ladies 
do this themselves. Alice Helme. 

Pontiac, Mich. 

The Research Club use a traveling library prepared by Mrs. Mary Spencer, 
State Librarian. 

Pontiac has no public library. The public schools maintun a library of 
from four to five thousand volumes, Miss Elizabeth Hixson, librarian. 

The Ladies' Library Association has a small library (cannot give number 
of volumes), books are ^ven out from 2 to 5 o'clock on Tuesdays and Sat- 
urdays; Miss Agnes Cudworth, librarian. 

I am sorry that I cannot tell more about the number and character of|c 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 26 

the books added year by year. A card sent to the librarians will undoubt- 
edly bring all necessary information, I do not know of any organization 
of farmers where they would desire a traveling library. 

Kate Helen Brown, Pres. Research Club. 

Rochester, Mich. 
Would say our club has done nothing in library work. Our members make 
frequent use of the public library in Detroit as we are but a short distance 
from the city. We have in our town a good circulating library belonging 
to the Ladies' Library Association (over 1,200 volumes of fiction and his- 
tory), books loaned every week. Fee, fl.OO per year. New books con- 
stantly added Sosie L. Fox, Cor. See. 

Williamston, Mich. 

Our club is using the State traveling library made up especially for our 
year's program. We have no town bbrary but each of the three Sunday 
schools have a good library and the school also has a good one, have just 
added 16 volumes, costing $96.00, An effort has been made several times 
to organize and have a town library and reading rooms, but failed. They 
say books are so cheap that almost every one owns all they can read. A 
good reference library, however, would be advantageous. 

I will inquire of the Grangers and country clubs and report. 

Mary Beardsley. 

SEVENTH msTRier. 

Mrs. Elsie H. Piatt, Port Huron. Report. 

My efforts in the library movement can be told, but the results are not 
in a get-at-able form. 

Over one-half of my district is occupied by farmers, tliinly dispersed, who 
need, but lio not, apparently, know it, these advantages. The federated 
clubs are bunched where the needs are not so great. My efforts at getting 
a working committee at Lapeer were not successful, and I gave up that 
method. Instead, I tried at my own expense, advertising in the news- 
papers. In all publications in my district, except where there are more 
than one in a town, I had a notice to the effect that I wanted to establish 
a free traveling library in every cross-roads store or post-office where that 
paper circulated. The effect of this trial cannot be told at present. 

The conditions of two or three of my counties, as shown by the official 
statistics is shameful, and one county does not appear at all. School libra- 
ries in my county are well equipped, and on the occasion of the meeting of 
the county commissioners I plead with my own representative to labor with 
his brother officers to induce them to have a better shoeing next year. He 
took the pamphlet, marked with my opinion, and he showed it to the 
deUnquents. 

I have written or sent circulars to every club woman in ray territorj', 
whose address I knew. Sometimes I attacked society women at social 
functions until I am afraid of being a bore. I have asked these latter to 
use their opportunities in riding around the eountrj' to interview small 
merchants. Some have resiwnded as to the conditions of their own towns, 
with which they are generally satisfied, but the missionarj- spirit is lacking. 



26 REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISaiONERS. 

The few libraries that I have been instrumental in locating have been 
-entirely satisfactory, and in one instance the community were graduated 
from that form of education into being a part of the Caraegie Library. 



EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

No memijer appointed. 

NINTH DISTRICT. 

Mre. G. A. Barstow, Onekama. Heport. 

The following ten cities contain clubs in the Ninth Congressional District: 
Cadillac, Fremont, Hart, Ludington, Manistee, Muskegon, Newaygo, North- 
port, Pentwater and Shelby. 

Upon returning from Bay City last October, full of the spirit of organizing 
hbraries, and extending the library interests, I wrote to the presidents of 
the various clubs in this district again, for the names of their library secre- 
taries and also for the possibility of placing a circulating or registered library 
in their immediate vicinity or outlying school districts or villages. Only 
four responses came, and each one conveyed the idea that they and their 
clubs had access to good library facilities either in public or private libraries, 
and nothing was said of their neighbors. The idea of "tieing a brother's 
keeper" has not permeated the clubs along library lines. I do hope that 
this point will be dealt with at the coming federation, and the club delegates 
report it enthusiastically to their various clubs. 

During the early winter I wrote a letter explaining the work of the library 
committee, the untold good these little libraries were accomplishing, and the 
abuse having been made of the moneys set aside by the State to be used by 
the various school districts for library purposes only, and stating the amounts 
received by each township and the number of books purchased through the 
year. , 

This letter I sent to three papers for publication. It was published by 
two, the third stating they had no room for so lengthy an article. Before 
the close of the school year I appeared before the Manistee County Teachers' 
Association, at Onekama, and presented the work, and also asked each 
teacher present to acquaint himself as to the manner in which this library 
money was being expended in his district. If wrongly appropriated to refer 
the board to the compiled taws. 

A circulating library has been placed at Pierport; Bear Lake hopes to 
secure one in a few days and Onekama is asking for a third exchange. 

TENTH DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Ida E, Fallass, Petoskey. Report. 

The library conditions in Petoskey are not all that might be desired, but 
there seems to be a general awakening and the outlook is very encoura^ng. 

There is at present a free public school library of 1,354 books. 

There are three traveling state libraries, one in the Art Study Club, one in 
the Shakespeare Club, and one in the office of the county school commis;- 
sioner. L.OlKIC 

Through the efforts of the clubs in this city a civic improvement society 



MICHIGAN STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 27 

has been formed, and from it a library committee has been appointed to 
confer with a like committee appointed by the council, known as the city 
committee. The object is to establish a free city hbrary and reading room. 

Special members of the Art Study Club have worked zealously for a city 
Hbrary, and they have been ably assisted by clubs outside the Federation. 
Bay City has a large free public library known as the Sage library, contain- 
ing 28,064 volumes. East Tawas has a free library, containing 275 volumes. 

Of the seven Federated clubs in this district I have reports from the above 
three; the Art Study Club, Petoskey; Woman's Improvement Club, West 
Bay City, and the Ladies' Literary Club, East Tawas. 

All clubs have been supplied with all printed matter relating to library 
extension work, also many towns and country clulw in this vicinity. I 
have written twenty-four letters in all; eleven to Federated clubs and one 
club responded; thirteen to towns and country clubs and three replies 
were received. 

Although the interest in hbraries seems to be increasing in this district, 
still there is a chance for great improvement in this matter. 

I trust that through the earnest effort of our State Librarian and those 

. associated with her, the work may go on and that all the federated clubs 

will sooner or later realize their opportunity and co-operate fully in this 

good work of scattering Ubraries through the length and breadth of our 

State of Michigan. 

ELEVENTH DI9THICT. 

Mrs. 0. p. Carver, Traverse City. Report. 

In regard to library extension, I feel that we are gradually gaining 
in our work, I have been able to place four traveUng libraries in my dis- 
trict the last year and I find that people are becoming quite interested. I 
placed one at Summit City, a small place on the G. R. & I. R. R., in a pri- 
vate house and one at Mayfield, in a store and post-ofBce, and two at the 
We-que-tong Club House, and they have all given so much satisfaction. I 
have not placed any registered libraries as yet or established any libraries, 
but hope to be able to during the coming year of 1906. 



TWELFTH DISTRICT. 

Mrs, Lecia D. Strachan, Sault Ste. Marie, Report. 

In accordance with my duties as library secretary I wrote to each feder- 
ated club, also other clui^, asking them to unite mth us in our work. 

Calumet Woman's Club, Mrs. Irene C. Lee, Cor. Sec. 

Menominee Woman's Club, Mrs. Grace Brown, Cor. Sec. 

Schoolcraft Ladies' Library Association, Miss Lois Thomas, Cor. Sec. 

Manistique Woman's Rea(^ng Club, Ruth Griffith, Cor. Sec. 

Hancock Home Study Club, Mary G. Stockley, Cor. Sec. 

None of the above-mentioned clubs wished to take up the work this year. 
I wrote again and again and have concluded that personal and aggressive 
work is the better way to accomplish our ends, aS circulars or personal 
letters from our worthy president seemed to have little effect. 

Houghton has two libraries, the Woman's library Association and Library 
of Michigan College of Mines. 



28 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Hancock two, public school library and Portage Lake Public library. 
Painesdale, Sarah Sargent Library and the Quincy Township library at 
Qiiincy Mine, with an aggregate of 25,574 volumes. The Library of Michi- 
gan College of Mines, having 18,529 volumes, mostly scientific. The above 
mentioned libraries are all in mining districte. They are making an effort 
to install books which will meet the needs of every one, that is, in the differ- 
ent languages; and when we consider that we have between 60 and 70 dif- 
ferent nationalities it means quite a httle, for some, yes many, never master 
the English tongue. 

Schoolcraft is a farming country, having three libraries. Ladies' Library 
Association, consisting of 1,340 volumes; School library 850, and the Ply- 
mouth Circulating Library of 74 volumes, the latter changing every six 
months. 

Calumet has a fine Ubrary furnished by the Calumet and Hecla mine. 
They claim to be second in distribution in the State. 

In the town or village of Rockland in Ontonagon county, through the 
publication of an article in the Rockland Journal, $146.00 of library money 
was procured. 

The local secretary of Sault Ste. Marie sent out in the spring 65 letters 
to nearly eveiy teacher in Chippewa county, receiving 17 answers. In 
January I took advantage of the Teachers' County Institute and asked the 
co-operation of the teachers to aid us in the work of hbrary extension. I 
learned through them that few if any had libraries, but since our commis- 
sioner, Mr. Easterday, sent a letter to every director in the county that the 
library money must not be misappropriated, books are being bought and 
we expect to place libraries the coming year. 

The Woman's Club of Sault Ste. Marie voted, December 9th, to pay the 
expenses of a traveling hbrary to be placed in the Chippewa county house 
at once. 

The city of Sault Ste. Marie has a fine lire proof Carnegie library containing 
3,597 volumes. 

Your representative visited seven schools in the rural districts finding in 
none, books, save one, and those should not have been in circulation. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONBRS OF SCHOOLS. 



Rtporti of County Committionera 0/ Sei>ooh. 



^ss^- 




e 

s 


i 

IS 
2fi 

i» 

i 
1 

s 

H 

IS 

w 

26 








3 

« 

IS 


1 

11 
ss 






1 








t."iS;»-iS- 






















2 


























:: 










' 


' 




























s 










■•■ 


j 








I 


; 








a 












i^W^^t'^M. 










3 






1 

s 
s 












' 






H.Pnmkl.ggU>B, L«p«. 




2 








K 

IB 

i 

38 










B 
















1 










2 






e 
e 

! 




I 




































R. D. Diiky. Oayloid. 




3 


S3 


3 


















i 


•■■j- 














} 






* 






' 









D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



PUBLIC LIBRAiyES. 



BY W. F, LEWIS, 8CPEBINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, PORT HnSON. 

The Public library is now regarded as one of the great educational forces 
of the country. Along with the schoolhouse in every community, even the 
most rural, should stand this exponent of democratic ideas and free insti- 
tutions. Comparatively few children receive a good common school educa- 
tion. The average school life of the boys and girls of the whole country is 
a trifle over five years. When we think that three out of four of all pupils 
who enter the primary grades do not reach the grammar school, and that 
nine out of every ten who enter the primary school do not remain until the 
close of the high school, it is evident that some additional means of educa- 
tion must be provided at public expense. How can a boy of twelve or 
thirteen years, who has left school, know much about the lessons of history? 
What understanding has he of his rights as an individual or his duties as a 
citizen? 

Our Ubraries work in harmony with the schoob, but they also meet a 
need that the schools have never been able to supply. They give the place 
and the means to continue an education after school life is over. Our free 
institutions depend upon the education of the masses, the intelligence of the 
individual. The public schools furnish the opportunity but its work must 
be carried by the public library. The schools are for children, the library 
for life. That the public is alive to the great importance of the library is 
shown by the fact that in the last dozen years they have had a larger growth 
than in all previous years of their history. Within this time all the great 
library buildings have been built, the income for library purposes has been 
greatly increased, wise laws have been enacted. State library Commissions 
have been appointed in twenty-five states, district libraries have sprung into 
existence, w^ile the use of registered and circulating libraries is becoming 
a common privilege. Library building is now a national work. Mr. Car- 
negie's testimony to the influence of books upon his early life and his faith 
in the reading habit is shown by his princely gifts of more than 860,000,000 
for library purposes, the most remarkable benefaction in the history of 
philanthropy. Michigan has received thirty-four of his buildings, costing 
one and one-third millions and serving twenty-two per cent of our popu- 
lation. 

Everywhere is library activity. The value is not in what we have thus 
far accomplished but in the fact that schools and libraries have found each 
other, that the work has been organized, that systems and standards have 
been fixed. 

It is not until the last twenty years that the libraries of our great uni- 
versities and our colleges have touched upon their proper field of useful- 
ness. Previous to this time the library was there but its place in the col- 
lege work was small. Its shelves were full but its position in the active 



PUBLIC LIBRAKIES. 31 

life of the university was unrecognized and undiscovered. Today our 
college and university libraries occupy a place in the curriculum that is 
interesting and important. The library is the heart, soul and center of 
these great educational institutions. It is the workshop of the college, 
where all students meet for labor. Its books are no longer hidden ia sacred 
seclusion, but are regarded as the common property of all who will read. 

The college library is fully recognized as the laboratory where all those 
studies called humanities are pursued from documents as nearly original 
as may be supplied. 

The librarian is no longer a superannuated officer of the institution with 
an honorable title. His positioH is now second to no professor in the col- 
lege. His influence extends to every department of study. He must know 
the literature in every branch of college work and be able to refer students 
to such books as they need, with such system and accuracy that all the 
resources of the library may be available and at their immediate command. 

Since 1899 Michigan has been fortunate enough to have a State Library 
Commission. This commission consists of four members appointed by the 
governor for a period of four years. Their services are given without re- 
muneration. This commission is in a great measure responsible for the 
rapidity with which the spirit of library extension has spread over the state 
and for the activity with which the work has been taken up. We have our 
State Veterinary Board, Board to examine Barbers, State Live Stock Com- 
mission, etc. Surely our State Library Commission is equally legitimate 
and important, although not many years ago certain legislators thought the 
state .might better furnish boots than books. These scholarly men are 
giving generously of their time and strength for the purpose of organizing 
new libraries and increasing the efficiency of those already estabUshed. 
Under their plan of "registered libraries" any Ubrary, city village, township 
or district, if free to the public, may borrow from the State Board of Obrary 
Commissioners one hundred books. These books may be kept for a period 
of six months. If the Ubrary so assisted makes another purchase of books, 
the state will make another loan. These loans are made with the under- 
standing that all money coming from fines shall be used for the purchase 
of books. Villages large enough to have pubhc libraries, but where public 
sentiment is not sufficiently strong to cause their organization, are offered, 
as an inducement to establish a library, a loan of one hundred books, pro- 
vided a library shall be established with one hundred books on the 
shelves. Upon a subsequent purchase of books another loan will be 
made, the plan to last until the library becomes self-supporting. These 
registered Ubraries must be properly housed in a room having bookshelves 
and tables. The books must be free to the public and the library open at 
least part of two days each week. 

The residents of cities and large towns enjoy the free use of good books. 

It is the aim of the commission to extend this privilege into communities 
of small towns where books and magazines are few. These repstered hbra- 
ries are varied and comprise general selections of good books. They help to 
piece out here and there the struggling libraries of little villages. They 
arouse interest where there was none, encourage where help is needed and 
convince people of the wholesome influence of books where there was oppo- 
sition. 

Instances have come under my observation of the inspiration given by 
these state book loans. In a small village a library was voted. Sixty old 
books were gotten together in a few weeks as a nucleus, in addition to the 



32 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

huadred books loaned on the registered plan. These state books were the 
better and newer editions in history, travel, fiction, biography, and science. 
These volumes were immediately put in circulation and interest in the library 
was kindled at once. The next year they had added by regular tax five 
hundred books, and the year following the library numbered fifteen hundred 
volumes. This library is now firmly established in the community, b readily 
voted financial support and is administered with system. Two other similar 
instances of equal importance known to me mi^t be mentioned. 

That the library is a good thing for the city is never questioned. "Why 
is it not equally good for the village and the country? The duty of the 
state is the education of the masses. Nothing should be denied that use- 
fully serves this purpose. No institution is more closely connected with 
the Ufe of all the people than the public library. If the smaller towns can- 
not maintain hbraries, the state should give systematic aid. By this aid 
through the State Commission, dead libraries have come to life, stagnant 
pools have been converted into fresh reservoirs and interest in books greatly 
stimulated. 

In order to further their work of hbrary extension, the^tate Library 
Commission have employed a competent organizer. This official will give 
advice on hbrary matters. By personal visits he will put heart and back- 
bone into weak and strugghng hbraries, will call to his aid the active sui^>- 
port of teachers and school commissioners in an endeavor to have library 
moneys appropriated for the purpose designated by law. He will be ready 
at all times to furnish information leading to the improvement of library 
service, will assist in educating public sentiment to a desire for library privi- 
leges, and will be keenly alive to the ways in which a library may be most 
useful. 

Four hbrary institutes wiU also be held during the coming year, for the 
■ purpose of giving inspiration and systematic instruction to hbrarians and to 
promote the library interests of the state. 

The second method of Ptate aid for library privileges is by means of trav- 
eling libraries which are under the direction of our very efficient State Li- 
brarian, The traveling hbrarj' is for those who live in places remote from 
the pubUc library. Its purpose is, that these people may have the privilege 
of an easy access to books. The quiet work done in this useful field has 
escaped general notice and comment. In 1895 the Legislature made its 
first appropriation of twenty-five hundred dollars for traveling libraries. 
This amount has been increased from time to time. The amount set apart 
by the Legislature of 1905 for this purpose being sixty-five hundred dollars 
for 1906, and a similar appropriation for 1907. This increase clearly show- 
ing that our law-making body is convinced of the importance of this work. 

These libraries are made up in sets of fifty volumes. About fourteen 
volumes in each library is first class fiction. Books of history, science, 
literature, travel, biography, with a touch of ethics and religion make up 
the remainder of the library. These libraries are sent upon the application 
of twenty or twenty-five tax payers. For small towns this form of appli- 
cation is desirable. But farmer's clubs, granges, Epworth Leagues, Women's 
clubs, or any other association, organized for the purpose of study or read- 
ing, may secure these books. These libraries are kept for a period of three 
months, with a privileged extension to six months. The expense is an 
annual fee of S5.00. This pays transportation on four libraries during the 
year, or one dollar and twenty-five cents on one library. These boolra are, 
usually placed at some point convenient to the public and are loaned -witlv"- 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 33 

out charge to any person who will observe the rules made by the local li- 
brarian or trustee. In fact, these small libraries are managed as nearly as 
possible like a public library. That the plan has already met with success 
is shown from the fact that during the past twenty months more than six 
hundred of these libraries have gone out from our State Capitol. They 
have traveled into nearly every county in the state, into farming districts, 
scattered villages and lumber towns whose days of prosperity are over. These 
books, sometimes placed in the corner grocery or post office, often give the 
reader his first real touch with the great interests of life. 

No activity of the state is more altruisite in its economy than this effort 
to enable the grown up person and the child to have those opportunities of 
culture and instruction from books that only the rich can enjoy without 
the privilege of libraries. These circulating libraries often form a working 
basis. People take more and more interest, funds are raised and the free 
public library becomes started. Sometimes money is raised by entertain- 
ment or supper and the proceeds swell the library fund. Much has been 
done, but the traveling library must expand. The state cannot afford to 
count the cost of so vuuable an agency for its civilization and progress. If 
ten times the amount were appropriated it would remain a profitable in- 
vestment. 

The time should come when these books are available to all the people in 
all sections of the state, and will it be asking too much from the state to 
carry this mental stimulus to the very doors of those who, through chance 
or selection, are passing their fives away from social and intellectual cen- 
ters? As the system expands, will it be impossible to distribute a small 
collection of five or ten books from house to house with a horse and wagon 
in the manner that libraries are sent out from some of the great library 
centers in the East? We hope, in time, contributions from the state may 
include pictures, cliildren's periodicals, magazines, lantern slides, photo- 
graphs, as well as books for the old and young. 

The authority for the establishment of free public fibraries is found in 
Article 13, Section 12 of the Constitution of Michigan, which provides for 
the organization of fibraries in cities and townships, and that all fines for 
the violation of penal laws collected in the county shall be appUed exclu- 
sively to the support of libraries, unless this fund shall be especially voted 
for school purposes. Under this constitutional provision, Ubrary laws have 
been passed by our legislature from time to time, governing the establish- 
ment of libraries and providing that all penalties and forfeitures imposed 
in justice and circuit courts, shall be applied for hbrary support and for no 
other purpose. The apportionment of this money is under the direction of 
the Superintendent of PubUc Instruction and the money is distributed by 
the County Treasurer each year before the first day of June. Criticism 
has been offered upon this law on the ground that the prosperity of so im- 
portant an institution should not bear a direct ratio to the wickedness of 
the people and that this fact has a tendency to degrade the law in the eyes 
of the people. Still even crime may be made to offer some educational, 
compensating advantages. In addition, cities, towns and school districts 
have conferred on them the permissive right to tax themselves for library 
support. This district tax is doubtless of more dignity and puts the free 
public library where it rightfully belongs, .on an equal footing with the 
pubfic schools. 

The law governing the expenditure of Ubrary money as appfied to fines 
and forfeitures has been, and is still grossly violated. In some instances, I 



34 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

understand, that Boards of Supervisors direct the County Treaeurer to trans- 
fer this money to the general fund of the county or to certain other specific 
funds, thus unlawfully crippling the whole county in its library efforts and 
working irreparable wrong upon its children. In the first place, the Board 
of Supervisors act illegally, and secondly, the County Treasurer is a law breaker 
for carrying out the order of the Board. Justices of the Peace sometimes 
fail to report the fines imposed in their courts, while many school districts 
use this money, without the formality of a vote, for general school purposes. 
No doubt the law is violated often through the ignorance of school officers, 
but tHat School Superintendents in cities and in large towns, as well ae 
Ctrunty School Commissioners, will remain quiet while this sacred fund is 
used for ignoble purposes, seenis beyond comprehension. In a great ma- 
jority of cases no trouble would be necessary to put this fund to its legiti- 
mate use. Simply to call the attention of the proper ofiicials to the pro- 
visions of the law, with some earnestness, would place this money in its 
proper channel. Many County Commissioners have d(>'i6 good work in 
organizing libraries and in safe-guarding this fund. With the help of the 
State Board of Library Commissioners the time is near when eve^ dollar 
of this important fund will be applied where it rightfully and righteously 



Our city libraries are organized, sometimes under special charters and 
controlled by a Board of library Commissioners, or they remain school 
district libraries under the management of the Board of Education. 
In either case, in addition to the money derived from penal fines 
they are supported principally by direct tax, which usually does not 
exceed two-fifths of a mill on the assessed valuation. In some in- 
stances, no stated amount is guaranteed, but a yeariy maintenance is 
voted by the Common Council or by the people, which Is usually adequate 
for a moderate support. The library is deemed well provided for if it re- 
ceives one-tenth of the public school appropriation for a work second only 
to the schools in importance. Nearly all of these libraries are well housed 
in modem buildings. In fact, these structures form a notable addition to 
the fine public buildings of the state. It is said to be a national failing to 
exalt the value of bricl^ and mortar and to ignore the unseen value of study 
and culture. The plans of these new buildings are for the most part dis- 
tinctly novel. They have followed out a demand for plenty of light through- 
out the building. There are rooms for reading, study and reference work. 
Books are compactly stored and are easy of access, with adequate protection 
from fire and moisture. A second story usually provides a small audience 
hall, rooms for administration and for study clubs. 

Never before were the needs of children receiving such attention as now. 
The public library seems suddenly to have awakened in its responsibility 
for the little ones. The children's department is an addition of the last 
ten years. A few years ago it was a common library regulation to pro- 
hibit the borrowing of a book by a child under fourteen years of age. Not 
a half a dozen years ago, a librarian in one of our large cities voiced the 
statement that children should not be allowed in the public library, be- 
cause they wore the books out so fast. Today the best thing we can say 
for a child's book is that it is worn out and we need a half dozen copies 
in its place. A few years ago there were plenty of advocates among library 
architects and even among librarians that the children's room might be 
placed in the basement. Today it is conceded that the best room in the 
building should be set apart for this purpose. These rooms occupied by the 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 35 

children show an air of cheerfulness and refinement. They are well decor- 
ated. Small tables and chain are usually occupied by interested readers 
who are as quiet as their elders. Many of them are regular borrowers of 
the books which are shelved in low cases around the walls of the children's 
room. Pictures and books appropriate to the season or of historical interest 
are advertised from a bulletin board . while the room is decorated with plants 
and the walls are adorned with pictures or other works of art. Certainly 
the children's room has proved a blessing to many children whose homes 
are devoid of these beautiful things. The story telling hour has been re- 
sorted to for the purpose of inducing the children to read some of the books 
containing the stories told. Many other inducements are offered to help 
the pupils love the library. But of all the efforts the books themselves, 
with their handsome illustrations and their 'attractive bindings, are the 
strongest incentives to library reading. For this reason cheap books, poorly 
bound, with homely illustrations, printed on cheap paper should not be 
encouraged. A book sometimes through its binding, printing and beauti- 
ful pictures, imparts an idea of beauty and refinement and will exert an 
influence over a child even though he does not read it. On this account, 
a few attractive volumes are preferable to a larger number of much cheaper 
ones. 

I believe that children care less for fiction than adults; biography, the 
hves of heroes, history, travel and nature books appeal to their imagination. 
A taste for interesting reading once created in the children must direct 
their subsequent lives. The uplifting of the masses in a democracy depends 
largely on this cultivated taste for good reading. Any person who is old 
enough to write his name should have a card, and be allowed to draw books 
from the city library, by simply being identified with a home somewhere 
in town. Some unthinking parents are so outrageously mean they will not 
allow their children to draw books on the parent's card. The registration 
of the name is to very many, people an irksome task, but it seems necessary 
in order to easily trace public property after it has been taken away. Noth- 
ing in the line of a guarantee by a property owner should be required 
only the satisfactory evidence of the real name and residence. 

The past few years has noticed a marked development in the management 
of city libraries. The hours have been increased, to meet the convenience 
of the readers, the buildings are now open from nine o'clock in the morning 
to the same hour in the afternoon, for six days in the week, and happily 
many of them are open for a period of several hours on Sunday, thus giving 
opportunities for reading that would otherwise be devoted to less important 
matters. Ten years ago the suggestion that the book shelves might be 
thrown open to all, young and old, and that the public should be ^owed 
to handle the books freely, would have been regarded as evidence of a feeble 
mind, and at the best would have been considered visionary and entirely 
undesirable. Now-sa-days there is a great freedom of access to the shelves. 
They are thrown open to all borrowers and readers with the most favorable 
results. The best books of every kind are now given to the public and 
everyone is welcome to examine the books as he will. The purpose of the 
open shelves is that the books recommend themselves by being seen and 
handled. Many borrowers visit the libraries not knowing what they want, 
and by being allowed to browse about the books they will more often make their 
own selection, and in a measure become trained to the intelligent use of the 
hbrary. The old idea was that the library was a sort of jail, where the books 
should be locked up away from the public so that they might be always 



36 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS 

fresh and clean. They were carefully guarded, grudgingly doled out when 
it wae absolutely neceasaTy, called in after a short interval to be restored to 
their honored position behind the bars. Happily, all this is now done away 
with, the public are invited into the closest and most vital relations with 
the library. In the pubhc library with which I am most familiar, for the 
year ending December 31, 1904, under the system of open shelves, in which 
the public have access to every book in the library, but one book was lost 
or stolen. Even though fifty books had been misMng, the advantages would 
have heen far in excess of the loss. 

Branch libraries are aow coining into use for an important work in our 
cities and larger towns. The reason is perfectly obvious. Branch libraries 
are as necessary in towns of considerable size as are ward schools. It is as 
impossible for children and grown people to obtain an adequate supply of 
books from one library as it would be for all the children to attend the same 
school. Taxation for the library is applied on the whole city, and it is only 
just that equal facilities for obtaining books be provided for the different 
sections. Sometimes branch libraries are established at the request of man- 
ufacturers near their places of business, and in a few cases these employers 
have paid the running expenses of this library. Collections of books from 
the pubhc hbrary, adapted to various grades and ages, are being placed in 
school buildings, not as immediate hel[>s to the school work, but for the use 
of the neighborhood. Other sets of books go into the school room, and 
under th? skillful teacher, are used in such a way that children see no dif- 
ference between reading as a duty and reading as a pleasure. Fire depart- 
ments, street-car barns and the hospitals receive their collection of books 
from the main library, and the former weariness of waiting in these places 
has been •transformed by the presence of bright, entertaining reading. 

The Boston Public Library, for every dollar that it spends for books, 
expends ten dollars to get those books into circulation. At first thought 
this ratio of expense causes one to shudder, but I am inchned to think that 
the ten dollars are as legitimately expended as the one. In this city, as in 
one or two other great library centers, house to house deliveries of from five 
to ten books are made, thus bringing reading to the very doors. A library, 
howsoever large, is not of great value to a city as a whole, unless there is 
ample means for advertising it and bringing it to bear upon all the people. 
The scholar will find the library wherever it is located, but it is not for the 
scholar alone but for the masses. 

The most important problem in library work is that of furnishing good, 
reading matter to the people of country communities. It is necessary that 
people have the opportunity to use their powers to read for themselves 
during Ufe. Children in large cities, small cities, towns and villages, have 
the advantage of public libraries, and the most of them have access to read- 
ing matter through small collections of books kept in the schoolhouse. The 
chief problem as it appeals to me is granting better hbrary privileges to the 
children and parents of country school districts. Census Bulletin No. 16, 
1900, estimates the number of people living in the country as forty and one- 
third millions, or about fifty-three per cent of the total population. The 
people in rural districts read books more thoroughly, suffer fewer distrac- 
tions, discuss the books more carefully, and are not so foolishly in a hurry 
as the people in the city. It will, therefore, be evident that if they are pro- 
vided with a sufficient number of books, carefully selected, the greater will 
be the influence of the reading habit. ( iHl'-^k' 

Although it is legally provided that a township library shall Be maiA- 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES. i; ^ 37 

tained in each organized township of the state, the number of such libraries 
is gradually decreasing. In 1885 five hundred thirty-seven townships had 
libraries. This number has decreased from year to year until 1904, when 
three hundred seventy-four townships still held to this manner of book dis- 
tribution. The decrease in this form of library does not mean a less to the 
people in reading privileges, but a distinct gain as the district library has 
taken its place. The township seems to be too large a unit for the public 
library, as no considerable number of borrowers will go from three to sis 
miles to secure their reading. The student will do this, but the boys, the 
girls and the parents whom the public library ought to reach will not go so 
far. It has been estimated that three-fourtli of a mile is the average limit 
of distance that most readers will go to secure books. Beyond this radius 
the number of readers decreases in an alarming ratio. Libraries have not 
yet been founded at the three-fourths of a mile limit, but the district library 
more nearly approaches this important work in the library system. Again, 
township libraries are open usually but a half-day out of the seven. Tliere 
is certainly a question of the right of the state to tax people for purchasing 
books that are shut up away from the public six and one-half days out of 
every week. The township library in some sections of the state will con- 
tinue to grow and flourish for years to come, but the district hbrary will come 
more and more into use and will take its place as it ought to among the chief 
agenta of civilization. During the year ending September 5, 1905, six 
hundred seven townships of the state forfeited their library money. 

The little country libraries occupying a single bookcase are doing a greater 
work than is generally supposed. It is easily found by comparison that 
their usefulness and their influence is far greater than that of the larger 
libraries in cities and towns which are also better furnished. On account 
of their excellent work these district libraries have a right to exist, and are 
entitled to at least a fair portion of public money. The district library 
located in the httle school building is doing a mighty work in helping those 
who, after leaving the district school, never again enter any other educa- 
tional institution as a pupil. 

Any school district may establish a district Ubrary by a two-thirds vote, 
at any annual meeting, and such district is entitled to its proportion of 
books from the library of that township in which it is located. These books 
to be added to the district library. This library is also entitled to its share 
of the library moneys that shall be raised by tax in the township, or to their 
share of the fines appropriated to the township. Under this law 4,665 
school districts in the state maintain these libraries, and during the past 
year more than seventy-five thousand volumes were added to the district 
libraries. While during the same period less than nine thousand were 
added to the township libraries. Twenty-two counties in the state are 
maintaining each more than one hundred district libraries, and in thirty- 
nine counties there are more than forty libraries. ■ I believe that the growth 
and development of the district library will prove one of the most important 
movements in library activity. Nothing can be done to make life better 
and wider on the farm. Country boys and girls now have the advantages 
of the telephone, and the rural mail. They enjoy the beauties of nature 
with its never failing charms, but in addition they should have, like their 
brothers and sisters of the town and city, the best Ubrary facilities available. 
The custom of diverting money apportioned for library use, i. e., the money 
coming from fines, has become so fixed in certain counties that school boards 
appropriate it yearly for general school purposes. It is frequently done 



S8 REPOftT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

without the formality of the enabling resolution. Some district boards are 
anxious to so appropriate the money in order to cut down the tax rate a 
trifle, thus starving the children for a paltry few dollars. There should be 
no way whatever by which library money can be used for any other pur- 
pose than the annual purchase of books, and we hope, with the aid of the 
State library Board, to ^ve moral support and backing to the County 
Commissioners, that the years will not be many before every dollar of this 
fund is applied to its proper use. 

In very many districts the library has become so essential to the happi- 
ness of the people that money for its support is very easily obtuned yearly 
by taxation, and the people eagerly discuss other methods for its support. 
Proceeds from entertainments, suppers, fairs, have been applied to increase 
the library fund. The efforts of teachers and pupils in providing means for 
the purchase of books have been in some instances heroic. 

All honor to the good work that has been done by County School Com- 
missioners, and teachers in furthering the work of the district libraries. Its 
usefulness and extension must go on. With a good working library in every 
one of the school districts of the state, adequately supported, what can 
measure its usefulness? The selection of books need not be large, tluee 
hundred to four hundred good books in the district library judiciously 
limits children's choice to those volumes that will be helpful in the studies, 
and ingrMu the reading habit. The influence of the district library is al- 
ready felt in reading, spelling, geography and language work; it is of great 
value for special day observances; it is an aid that the schools cannot do; 
its biographies of heroes''^fire the young mind with ambition, and instill high 
ideals into the hearts of children. There is no better opportunity to correlate 
the use of books with the schools than in the district library. The school 
and the library are together, and a wise direction will give pupils the 
library habit, with some hterary tastes. 

I have known teachers who looked upon the library with disfavor, feeling 
that outside boolcs interfered with the regular work df the schools, but in 
the great majority of cases the children were seeking in the library for 
the very things that made school and study worth while. The Indian stories, 
stories of travel and adventure, heroes and war, outdoor life, birds and ani- 
mals, folk-lore, fable and nature study all appeal to the growing child, while 
in imagination they eagerly go with Nansen to the North Pole or with.Du 
Chaillu to the jun^es of Africa. 

Each year the department of agriculture expends sums that reach into 
the millions of dollars for [investigation of subjects which are of vast im- 
portance to farmers. The bulletins showing the results of these scientific 
investigations are sent without cost to all who have interest enough to 
apply. The peculiar thing about the matter is that less than one per cent 
of the people who would be most benefited by this information, ever send 
for the bulletins. The agricultural department is not merely passive in the 
matter but is very anxious to put tlus information into the hands of the 
farmers. They a^o send cars to asirist in making this literature of the 
greatest use. In my judgment, all this literature should find its way into 
the district library, ais it can be obtained without cost and is of inestimable 
value to the people of the farm. I simply cite this as one instance of neces- 
sary and valuable literature affecting community interest. 

A prevailing practice in all schools is that of adhering slavishly to the text 
book, and not taking the broad view of the subject which comes from con- 
sulting other authors. The perusal of different books on the same subject 



PUBUC LIBRARIES. 39 

will make the Btudy of a topic more ttLorougb, will induce a love of books, 
and cause the people to acquire the tendency of turning to the Ubrary for 
instruction. Children should read a large number of books as well as read 
a few books well. They should read for pleasure, for instruction and for per- 
fection in speech. Of course the great cry now-a-days is for fiction and more 
fiction in excess of all other books. This would show a large demand for read- 
ing as pure recreation. To the majority of people who work hard day by day, I 
suppose the novel gives a glimpse of the ideal life, and in its reading they 
lose for a time the hardships of the present day. I think the most of us 
will confess to more or less genuine pleasure even in the ordinary novel 
such as "The House of Mirth," and "The Debtor." Children, however, 
read less fiction than do their elders. The quaint old town of Salem, of 
witch-craft fame, confesses that eighty-two per cent of her readers choose 
fiction, while a larger city in the middle west, distinguished for its beer, 
has the fewest fiction readers of any city in the country. Children left to 
themselves will not select the best books, sometimes they will choose the 
worst. Such titles as "Slugpng Tim" and "The Ranger of the Wild West," 
will appeal to a vigorous growing boy. It therefore is the duty of the school 
as a responsible factor of the boy's life to see to it that the best books are 
placed before him. Not only that, but his interest must be aroused so that 
he will read thrae books and form something of a taste for them. It is not 
enough to hint that certain books are good to,read, or that they may be 
found upon the shelves of the book-case. Interest must be aroused to such 
an extent that the children will read them. It is not necessary that chil- 
dren pass through that stage of intellectual measles and live through a 
period of reading trash to acquire later on an appetite for good books. It 
IS not always necessary to be familiar with the bad in order to know the 

Sood. Some years ago the Hull House settlement took up the work of en- 
eavoring to induce the housekeepers in the vicinity to do their cooking ac- 
cording to the principles of modem hygiene. A day or two after the first 
lesson was given, a poor woman came into the office and with tears in her 
eyes said "I don't like to eat hygienes. I want to eat what I'd ruther." 
Now children will read what they'd "ruther." The problem of the teacher 
is not in keeping' away the bad reading, but in elevating the taste so that 
the boys and girls will prefer the best. 

It would be a bold prophet who w(juld predict the extent or even the 
direction of hbrary growth in Michigan during the next decade. There are 
certfun tendencies, however, which are based upon the work of the past few 
years. The enthusiasm of the present will result, I think, in an increasing 
steady growth as well as in an increased efficiency. Of course nearly aU 
^owtb and development has its jumps which are followed by a relapse. 
There is strong enthusiasm and great interest followed by a wane. This 
tendency will have to be offset by strengthening the library among the tax- 
payers, by securing increased appropriation for their support. I feel sure 
that the present State library Board will be given more authority which 
will result in a wider extended state inspection. More and more libraries 
will be formed, especially will the district library increase in numbers and 
develop in usefulness. It ia the proud boast of Massachusetts that every 
one of her townships, numbering three hundred fifty-three, has its public 
library. We believe that Michigan, with a louder voice, and with greater 
pride, will assert that every school district in the state, numbering 7,338, 
will possess a good working hbrary. This is an age in the development of 
pubho utilitjes, electric lighting and gas, court nouses, improvement of 



40 3 UEPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

roads, public buildings, more money for the public schools, all these agencies 
heap up the taxation until the tax-payers groan beneath their load. But 
the public library must be ranked of equal importance with any educational 
agency demanding public aid. 

President Elliott has called our attention several times to the responsi- 
bility of the public in matters of education and he suggests that our ex- 
penditures will in the near future seem to have been niggardly in compari- 
son with what will then be regarded as necessary. Library legislation will 
be more stringent and the acts which now enable public libraries to be sup- 
ported by taxation will be exchanged by mandatory legislation, compelling 
their establishment and support in a manner not different from the public 
schools. 

The number of books drawn from libraries in the United States yearly is 
not far from ninety milHons, scarcely more than one book per year for each 
inhabitant. The reading people read many books yearly, still the book bor- 
rowers, even in our cities, number Scarcely one-tenth of the population. Who 
are not readers? Very many children, laborers, clerks, mechanics, and 
business men. The mountain must be brought to Mohammed. They must 
he sought out and books left at their doors. The successful hbrary will be 
the one that not merely opens its doors, but that takes up the active work 
of sending its books into nearly every home. I believe the district school- 
house, with its library, will be the common meeting ground for evenings of 
recreation and study tor the neighborhood. The libraries are the most 
democratic of institutions. Here we can all meet on a level regardless of 
politics or creed. Libraries will be brought to bear upon the work of the 
schools to an extent we scarcely imagine now. It will be the laboratory 
for all those studies outside the sciences, and will be justly entitled to the 
same liberal support as the scientific laboratory. Worn books and empty 
shelves will measure the activity of the future library. It will be advertised 
and exploited, and we hope become so necessary that the laboring man who 
contemplates building a home, will inquire about the library privileges of 
the neighborhood as he now enquires about the schools. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



-'y X y 



^ 1 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1906. 



D,„„.db,Google' 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, l')06. 



M '8^ 



D,„„.db, Google 



State 
>f Library Commissionei 
Ijaxsino, Mich. 



Mr. James B. Peter, Saelnaw, 

President. 
Mr. H. R. pATTENOitL, LanslDg. 
Mb. He^rt Nelson Lohd, Au Sable. 
Mb. David E. Hei Neman, Detroit. 
Mrs. M. C. Spencer, Lansing, 
Secretary. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 

January 30, 1907. 
Hos. FitF,i> M. Warner, 

Gotcnior of llichigan: 
Sir — I have the honor to 8u^nlit the seventh annual report of the State 
Board of Library CommiBfiioners for the year ending December 31, 1906. 
Very respectfully, 

James B. Peter, 

President. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



Report of the Secretary 

Library Institutes 

Library Training in Normal Institutes 

labrary Organizers 

Associate Libraries 

Library Committee State Federation of Women's Clubs. . 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Report op the Secretary. 

Thia report contains statements from the different organizatioas 
which, during the past year, have worked together in the interest of li- 
brary eitenaion in the state of Michigan. By their concentrated and 
harmonious efforts, a great advancement has been made in the library in- 
terests of the state. The Department of Public Instruction, the County 
CommisaionerB of Schools, the Wouien's Clubs and the county organ- 
izers of village and rural libraries have all worked faithfully and with 
enthuaiaam, with one object in view — that of building up a strong and 
enduring library syetem in this state. The result has been that from all 
points come inquiries for information and requests for help. New school 
libraries are being organized; old district and townahip libraries have 
awakened to a seuae of their privileges and are using the penal fines 
for the purchase of books nnd availing themselves of the hundred 
book loan offered by the Board of Library Commissioners. The past 
year the Board has endeavored to enlarge the aeope of the plana already 
established for library- extension and has also carried out new plana 
as far as poaaible with the limited appropriation provided for the work. 

The Depabtmest of PfBLic Instruction. 

This department haa been eapecially active in all matters relative to li- 
brary expanaion. The use of the penal fines has been carefully investi- 
gated, and in the case of the misuse of tliiH money, prompt and emphatic 
notice has been ser^■ed on the offenders — in many oasea the delinquency 
has been more that of carelessness than of intent and upon request, the 
diversion of theae funds has been corrected. 

Legislation has also been prepared by the department, which will 
largely increase the usefulness of our library ayatem. The Board of 
Library Commisaioners wishes to gratefully acknowledge the help given 
it by W. H. French, Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction, whose 
counsel and ex^terience have added largely to the auccesa of the work. 

County Commissioners of Schools. 

Many letters have been received from these officerB, endoraing the ef- 
forts of the board to build up the township and district libraries of the 
state. While difference of opinion may exist as to the relative usefulness 
of theae two ayatems. all are agreed that a strong library in a town or 
district means a strong school. Owing to unavoidable delay in sending 
out the necessary blanks, the report of the school libraries does not ap- 
pear in this report. An exhaustive statement of library conditiona will 
appear in the next report of the Board. 



8 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

A plan wbicb will result in an increased use of the traveling libraries 
in the more remote counties of the state, is now being formulated by the 
Board. Under this arrangement a number of traveling libraries will be 
sent to the ofSce of the county commissioner, or to some depository named 
by that officer, who will also place the work under resiwnsible care and 
from that point the libraries may be loaned to the more remote and In- 
accessible parts of the county. This experiment has recently been tried 
in Houghton county, with most satisfactory results. 

LiBBARY Committee State Federation Women's Clubs. 

The reports of this committee show faithful and persistent effort on the 
part of its members. That full success has not been attained, is owing 
to the lack of action on the part of the local clubs. It is impossible for 
the Federation Committee to be successful in the larger sense, unless its 
members receive from the local clubs all along the line a sympathetic re- 
sponse to their appeals for co-operation. It is difficult to realize the re- 
sults which could be obtained if every local club in the federation would 
appoint a library committee to work out the various library problems 
in its locality. 

Think what this would mean — an intelligent investigation by mothers 
of the books which their children are reading, building up poor libraries 
and establishing new ones, selection of good books and discarding vicious 
ones, placing traveling and registered libraries, furnishing collections of 
books to the sick children who are shut in and often times found in pov- 
erty and sorrow, carrying to many desolate places the "sweetness and 
light" of good reading. A little time given by each club to this work 
would produce manelous results, and add largely to its influence and 
usefulness. 

The Board of Library Commissioners will afford the clubs all possible 
help in this movement. Printed material will be sent when requested, 
lists of good books will be furnished and all inquiries will be promptly 
answered by the member of the federated committee in the congressional 
district where the club is located. 

It is a pleasure to report that in many localities active efforts on the 
part of the club women have resulted in the establishment of free public 
libraries, the nucleus for which has often been the books belonging to a 
ladies' library association. The free public library established 
in Laingsburg through the efforts of the Women's Clab is a good example 
of what may be accomplished by the unselfish effort of a few faithful 
women. 

Library Training. 

Acting under the resolution passed by the board in October, 1905, 
three library institutes were held in this state, the Board acting in con- 
nection with the State Association of Librarians.* Proceedings of these 
institutes are included in this report. 

Undoubtedly the most important work done by the Board of Library 
Commissioners during the past year was the establishment of training 
schools in the Normal College at Ypsilanti and the three normal schools 
at Kalamazoo. Marquette and Mt. Pleasant. These classes were opened 
the 25th of June and closed the .3rd of August. The object of this plan 



REPORT OF SECRETARY. 9 

was to give the teachera of the rura) ^^chools and in the small towna 
and villages, who are generally the custodians of the school libraries, 
the elementary training which will enable them to use, and help the 
pupils to use the books in an intelligent manner. Practical instruc- 
tion was given on the following subjects: 

General care and management of a small library. 

Selection of books. 

Practical use of school libraries. . 

Accessioning. 

Classification. 

Cataloguing. 

Reference work. 

School work. 

Special lectui«s were given on topics of value to the librarians of small 
libraries, but the work was largely practical and individual. Model li- 
braries were also arranged for the use of the students. In order to 
awaken the interest of the teachers and invite their attendance upon the 
classes in library science, at the close of the work certificates were issued, 
stating that the holders had taken tbe course and were qualified to select 
books and manage small libraries which may come under their care. 
The holders of these certificates are also in close touch with the secretary 
of this board, who is ready to assist them in all details of library 
management. 

The result of this work has been to place in a number of counties in the 
state, an instructor, upon whom the Board of Library Commissioners 
may call for the information which they may desire regarding libraries 
and also whom they may send to different points in tbe county to aid tbe 
teachers in the organization and management of their libraries. The ad- 
vantages of this plan have been more than commensurate with the ex- 
pense and labor involved. Reports from the instructors engaged in this 
work are included in this document. 

The Board of Library Commissioners is preparing to carry on the 
work as explained above in a larger way than was possible during the 
past year. The course of library science will again be organized in the 
normal schools, and in the teachers' examinations credits will be given to 
those who have taken the course in library training. 

In addition to this work a two weeks' course in library science was 
placed by the Board in the county normal training school at Manistee. 
Miss Ruth it. Wright, an assistant in the State Library, had charge 
of its instruction. Twenty students availed themselves of this course. 

Representatives from the State Library attended the following meet- 
ings: 

January 19, library opening at Fenton. 

March 31, meeting of school officers at Jackson. 

May 10, county teachers* association at Flint, 

Orcv.mzation op Libiubies. 

In April, at the request of the Sui>erintcndent of Schools at Oxford, 
an assistant in (he State Library was sent to classify and catalog 
the High School Library in that village. The work was l)egnn April 
17th and continued until May 4th. 



10 REPORT OF* BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

The orgauizer found a w.ell selected collection of some Bereo buDdred 
books, not including several sets of periodicals, bistory and literature 
predominating. The books were not in any order as there was no system 
of classification in use. In preparation for the work of re-organizing a 
condensed accession book had been ordered from the Library Bureau, as 
well as a catalog caw of four trays and a supply of standard size L. B. 
cards. The books were first accessioned, then classified by the Dewey 
decimal system, three figures only being used exoept in travel, then cata- 
loged on the L. B. cards, the cards being typewritten. All books so worn 
as to necessitate rebinding were made ready for the bindery, while those 
needing repairs were mended by the pupils under the direction of the 
organizer. The card catalog was arranged upon the dictionary plan, 
authors, subjects, and titles being put in one alphabet. 

There was a lively interest displayed in the work both by tbe teachers 
and pupils and by the townspeople as well. The president of the Board 
of Education visited the school while the work was in progress and 
showed much interest in and satisfaction with the methods employed. 
The Superintendent was desirous of making the re-organized collection 
intelligible to the pupils, and at his request the organizer gave a short 
talk before the school on modern library methods, explaining the system 
of classification, and the card catalog. 

No report has been received as to the subsequent use of the library, but 
it is hoped that interest aroused at this time will have the effect of in- 
creasing both the size and usefulness of the collection. 

The State Board of Library Commissioners sent one of their assist- 
ants, in August, to organize the Howell Carnegie Librae}'. This is 
incorporated as a township library with a board of six members. The 
115,000 building was given by Andrew Carnegie. The Ladies' Library' 
of Howell gave about 1,300 books and other gifts and new books pur- 
chased, brought the accessions up to about 2,300. The books were classi- 
fied and cataloged, the simplified Newark chat^ng system was installed 
and the library was put in thorough working order. 

Adrice and active assistance will be rendered by the Board of Library 
Commissioners in tbe oiganization of new and tbe re-organization of 
old libraries. In the matter of small collections of books the students 
who took the course in library science at the summer schools will be 
available for this work, for which traveling expenses and a per diem 
will be paid by the Board. For the work in the larger libraries a 
trained assistant will be sent from the State Library. 

Reports of Associate Libraries. 

The statistical statement of the assm-iate libraries is included in tbe 
biennial report of the State Librarian. The reports, added to this 
document, ai-e more, general in their nature, and many of them will 
give helpful suggestions to the smaller libraries. Among the more 
interesting reports are those of l>r. Theodore W. Koch, Librarian of 
the University of Michigan; Mr. Henry Utiey. Librarian of the Detroit 
Public Libi^iy; Mr. Samuel H. Bnuck, of the Grand Rapids Public 
Library; Mi-s. 10. S. (Irierson. of the Calumet & Hecia Library, and 
Miss Gertrude Humphrey, Librarian of the Lansing Public Library, 
Mr. Ranck's i-eport is so exhaustive and so full of valuable suggestions 



REPORT OF SECRETARY. 11 

that it has been a pleasure to priut it intact. Many of the activities 
meatioaed by Lim can be siicceHsfuily carried on by smaller libraries, 
to the great advantage of tbeir patrons. 

In summing up the activities of the State Board of Library Com 
inissioners dnring the past year, while the work has been complicated, 
tlie situations often perplexing and sometimes discouraging, yet taken 
as a whole, substantial progress has been made in library extension 
in Michigan, and the outlook for the coming year is full of promise. 

MaHV <_'. Si'EXCBB, 

Secretary. 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY INSTITUTES. 

LiBRABY Institutes Helo Under the Co-operation of the State Board 
OF LmRARY Commissioners and the Michigan Library Association, 

The first institute was held in Hudson, January 23-24. Electra 0. 
Doren, director of the Western Reserve university library school, Cleve- 
land, was the conductor, assisted by Miss Caroline Burnite, head of the 
children's department of the Public library of Cleveland. They were 
assisted by Miss G. M. Walton of the Normal College Library, Ypeilanti. 
Mr. Theodore W. Koch, Librarian of the University library. Miss Mamie 
E. Havens of the local Library and Miss Gertrude P. Humphrey of the 
Public Library of Lansing. 

The institute began on the morning of Tuesday the 23rd, and ad- 
journed at noon the following day. The subjects treated at the institute 
were along the following general lines: 

Miss Doren spoke on library organization and administration, 
including the selection and buying of books, records and ac- 
counts. Miss Burnite covered the various phases of work with chil- 
dren iu the modern public library. Both Miss Doren and Miss Burnite 
furnished much illustrative material, including lists and syllabi of the 
lectures. Mr. Koch explained the value of Library of Congress and other 
printed cards for small libraries, proving his points by a miniature dic- 
tionary catalog. Tuesday evening a stereopticon lecture on Carnegie li- 
braries was also given by Mr. Kocb, Miss Mamie E. Havens explained the 
methods of the local library. Miss Humphrey spoke of loan systems, con- 
sidering the Brown and Newark as typical ones. Their mutual advant- 
ages and disadvantages were brought out with illustrative material and 
the modified Newark i-ecommended for the average small public library. 

Ten Michigan libraries were represented at the institute by twenty 
people, as follows: Tecuinseh 2. .Adrian 2. Hillsdale 1. Lansing State 
Library 4, Uinsing Public Library 1. Battle Creek 1. (Si-and Rapids 2, 
Ann Arbor (University) 2, Ypsilanti Normal College 2, Hudson 2. 
Besides the librarians several much inteivate<l library trustees and 
numbers of local club women attended the various sessions. 



i.vCooglc 



REPORT OP BOARD OE' LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



The second library institute was held in Traverse City, January 26-27. 
All sessions of the meeting were held in the Carnegie Library lecture 
room. 

The speakers and program were largely the same as at Hudson with 
the following variations. Mr. Koch, the first vice-president o( the Asso- 
I'iation. presided until the president, Mr. Banck of Grand Rapids, ar- 
rived on the second day. That evening the latter gave an enthusiastic 
talk on "interesting the public in the library." Miss Helen Stout, the 
local librarian, explained the methods used in the Traverse City library 
and Miss Hnoiphrey added a discussion of "Library Records." 

After the addi-ess of Mr. Itauek the remainder of the evening was de- 
voted to social pleasures. First one hundred invited guests were given a 
delicious supper by the woman's clubs. This was followed by an inter- 
esting program presided over by Mr. Sprague, president of the Library 
Board. The Mayor, Superintendent of Schools and other important lo- 
cal personages were called on for speeches. )fuch good was acooniplished 
for the library by this evening and the visitoi's. in spite of the fact that 
they had contributed to the occasion, felt that they had profited much. 

The special features of this institute compared with that of Hudson, 
were the attendance of a proportionately large number of teachers 
with several superintendents of schools, and their participation in the 
discussion of library work for children with special emphasis on the 
reading as given by Miss Burnite; and also the great interest taken in 
the meeting by the newspaper people of the town. The libraries and 
schools of .\nn Arbor, East Jordan, Frankfort. Grand Rapids, lousing, 
Manistee and Traverse City, were represented to the number of nine 
persons, altlio the librarians from small libraries in the vicinity did 
not attend ae had been hoped. Twenty-one were in attendance at some 
of the regular sessions. 

This meeting was considerably more informal than the one at Hudson 
altho it was attended by more of the general public than the previous one. 

The mutual benefits of membership in both the American and State 
Library Associations were brought to the attention of those present 
at both of these institutes. The various valuable publications of the A. 
L. A. were especially noted for their practical aid to small libraries, a 
considerable collection of these tracts being supplied for examination 
and sale through the courtesy of the State Librarian, who also furnished 
sample copies of a finely illustrated edition of sixteen books which Miss 
Burnite recommended that every children's librarian should know. A 
model Library Bui-eau sample collection of library tools which had been 
presented to the State Board of Library Commissioners was kindly 
loaned by them for exhibition at Traverse City, Outlines of subjects dis- 
cussed and illustrated samples were distributed at both institutes. 

ISIIPEMIXG. 

The third of the institutes was held at Ishpeming, May 17-18. It was 
conducted by Miss Hazeltine, preceptor of the Wisconsin library school 
assisted by Mrs. E, fi, Grieraon of the ('alumet Public librarv and Mr. 



REPORT OF SECRETARY. 13 

Theodore W. Kocli of the University Library. Tliere was an average at- 
tendaoce of 15 library workers at the four sessioDB, representing the 
libraries of Calumet, Escanaba, Iron Mountain, lehpeming, Marquette, 
Negaunee and Painsville. Practically all who attended the Ishpemiog 
institute were librarians or library assistaats. The club women were 
not represented and trustees and teachers were in evidence for a short 
time only. ]>espite these facts the attendance at Ishpeming averaged 
larger than at the previous institutes. Moreover, while the programs 
for the Hudson and Traverse City institutes were arranged before hand 
as to details of time, at Ishpeming these were left to the circumstances 
arising from day to day. The free and easy discussion of almost every 
question brought up was one of the delightful characteristics of the 
meetings. As one of the visiting librarians put it, everybody enjoyed 
the institute because she had such ample opportunity for doing some 
talking on her own account. 

Miss Hazeltine, in opening the institute, said that one to i»e successful 
must believe that his work is the most important that was being done. 
Library people must have this same feeling towards their own work 
if they wish to succeed to the utmost. Any library meeting makes us 
feel that we are taking part in a great world movement. The library 
opens a school for life to any one who cares to enter. It is not the one 
big library, but the thousand smiiil ones that mean the most to the people 
at large. 

Miss Hazeltine called attention to the fact that the library was a force 
which touched every side of every phase of life. In the small town indi- 
vidual work can be done better than in the large place, and the needs 
of the patrons of the library anticipated and kept in mind. The bar- 
renness of the lives of many people in small towns and rural commun- 
ities gives ample opportunity for the librarian to use his personal equip- 
ment and all library material at hand. Children must be reached 
early in life if they are ever to have a permanent appreciation of books. 
The library of a small town should tie the most familiar and sympathetic 
ground with the schools of the place. Library institutes have shown 
growth in their work since they were started, and now time is devoted to 
broad questions and fundamental matters. 

Mrs, Grierson, librarian of the Calumet Library, gave a helpful talk 
on assistance to readers. 

Miss Hazeltine followed with a practical talk on book selection and 
buying. Mr. Kooh gave an evening stercopticon lecture on Carnegie 
Libraries in the United States. At the closing session he explained the 
use and value of Library of Congress and printed cards for small li- 
braries. Miss Hazeltine explained the various methods and uses of the 
preservation of art material and coc<tume plates. A discussion of peri- 
odicals, binding and mending completed the program. 

These pioneer library institutes for which the State Board of Library 
Commissioners paid nut a comparatively large amount, cost them, accord- 
ing to a careful estimate, one dollar for the instruction received by each 
library assistant. In addition thei-e were four public meetings, at 
some of which very definite good was accomplished as at Traverse City. 
A'ery beneficial results have since been reported from Hudson. Besides 
much indirect help and stimulus was given to the work tbroughout 
the state, by the presence of some of the lM>st known and most efficient 



14 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISaiONERS. 

library workers in the countr.v. Their part in these meetings represented 
in eacb case several weeks of carefal preparation. 

The officers of the Association were represented at the meetings as 
follows: Hudson, two; Traverse City, three, and Ishpeming, two. The 
vice-president devoted fully ten days of his time in traveling to and at- 
tendance at the institutes, and the other officers somewhat less in actual 
participation in the meetings but much longer time in preparation and 
arranging for them. Aside from these various members of the Associa- 
ation gave liberally of their time and interest. 



LIBRARY METHODS IN SUMMKR NORMAL INSTITUTES. 

normal college. ypsilanti. 

Mary M. McL. Hnushall, Instructor. 

A class in Library Training was held at the Ypsilanti Normal College 
during the six weeks of the summer term. Mrs. M. McLellan Snushall, 
instructor. Two of the students devoted their entire time to the work, 
the others giving eight hours each week. Complete equipment for the 
work was furnished by the State Board pf Library Commissioners, this 
included a working library, selected by the instructor, and complete sets 
of library tools. Instruction was given in the technical branches of li- 
brary science, adapted especially to the needs of school libraries, and 
practical work was required in each subject. Aside from this, lectures 
were given on Reference work. Practical use of school libraries, Book 
selection. Picture Bulletin, and Mending and rehinding of books. 

The course was given as follows. June 26 to July 13: Classification, 
Book Numbers, Reference work, and a talk on Practical use of school li- 
braries. The I>ewey Decimal system of classification was studied, and 
each student classified a number of books according to that system. The 
same books were assigned hook mimbers with the use of the Cutter two- 
flgure author table. Notes were given on the best reference books and the 
students worked out reference problems as the best way to acquaint 
themselves with reference books and their use. Talks were given on refer- 
ence work with children and each student made a reference list from the 
books at hand, to be used by children in reading up preparatory to writ- 
ing an essay on the subject. July 16 to 20; Selection of hooks. Ordering 
and receipt of books, Preparation of books for the shelves, Accessioning 
and Ijoan Systems. In addition to these subjects, the class taking the 
maximum amount of work received instruction on the making of picture 
bulletins and each one in the class made a bulletin. In connection 
with the selection of books, methods, aids and the principles of book 
seieclion were considered. A talk was also given on the sources of fi-ee 
material worth procuring for school libraries. Practice work was 
given in accessioning and two loan systems were considered. July 23 to 
August 3: Cataloging. Mending and Rehinding of books, and a talk on 
Aspects of library work to be emphasized by those who are to give io- 
struction to teachers in their county. The work in cataloging was ad- 



REPORT OF SECRETARY. 



apted especially to the needs of »niull school lihraries. Each studeat cat- 
aloged a Dnmber of bcwks of a representative kind. 

The exaraiuation covered the whole cowi-se and certificates were given 
to the entire class. 



CENTRAL STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, MT. PLEASANT. 
RuTu M. Wright, Insteuctoe. 

Through the State Board of Librarv Commissioners, a course in Li- 
brary Training was given in the Central State Normal School at Mt. 
Pleasant, during the n\x weeks snmmer term of 1906. This was intended 
primarily for teachers having school libraries in charge, The needs of 
teachers iu school libraries were kept constantly in mind and the instruc- 
tion given presupposed no knowledge of the subjects treated. The aim 
was to make the entire course as simple and practical as possible. 

Complete equipment for the work was furnished by the Board of Li- 
brary CommiBsioners. This included a library of one hundred and fifty 
books, selected by the instructor, to be used in the practical work, and 
complete sets of library tools. 

Thirty-four students -were enrolled for the work and were divided into 
three classes. Various grades of teachers were represented, district 
school teachers, teachers from 'the graded schools, one school superintend- 
ent, one county commissioner, and one library assistant. 

laatruction was given largely by talks, to be followed by practice 
work and individual instruction. Mies Salisbury's "Library methods for 
school teachers," was used as the main text book, supplemented by the 
following leaflets sent out by the Board of Library Commissioners: 
Suggestive lists of reference books for small libraries; A simple system of 
call numbers suitable for small libraries; Dewey system of classification 
condensed for use in small libraries, and Pictures for school rooms. 
Simple methods were given to the students for the care and management 
of school libraries. This included work in Ordering. Accessioning, Classi- 
fication. Book numbers and simple Cataloging. Talks were also given 
on Reference books and how to use them. Children's reading. Book Selec- 
tion, helpful reading lists, and aids and Picture bulletins, including the 
mounting and displaying of pictures. 

Practical work was done by the students in each subject. In the order 
work, correspondence with reliable book dealers, preparation of order 
lists and checking books was required; in accessioning, practice work 
was done in recording a certain number of books on accession sheets; 
classification was taught from a simplified form of the Dewey Decimal 
classification, issued in leafiets. and the classification of a sufllcient num- 
ber of books was requii-ed to illustrate the divisions and subdivisions of 
the classification. The Author 1. 2. 3. book number, suitable for the small- 
est collection of books, was taken up by the class. The Cutter tables 
were also explained. In the elementary cataloging given to the class, 
only the most necessary facts were given. Special attention was given to 
the making of analyticals. Each student completed a dictionary cat- 
alog, illustrating, as far as possible, all rules for cataloging.' The 
arrangement of a dictionary catalog was then taken up and the 



16 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

BtudentB applied tbe rules of alphabetizing to the arrangement of their 
own catalogs. In the reference work, the nae and value of the various 
works of reference studied, was emphasized by questions giren out by 
the instructor to be looked up by the students. 

Much enthusiasm and interest was shown by tbe students throughout 
the course and many of them devoted extra time to the work. The 
Oommission's working library of one hundred and fifty carefully selected 
volumes was a source of inspiration to many of the teachers and these 
were allowed to go out over night to students in the course. 

Cei-tificates were issued to all students doing satisfactory work. 



weatern state normal school, kalamazoo. 
Esther Brainy, Instructor. 

Two classes in Library Methods were held in the Western State Nor- 
mal School during the six weeks of the summer term. This course was 
arranged by the State Board of Library Comntissioners. Equipment for 
the wort was furnished by the Board. This included a working library 
of one hundred and fifty volnmes and complete sets of library tools. 
Twenty-three students were enrolled for the work and two classes 
formed, meeting at 7:10 a. m. and 4:10 p. m. throughout the term. 

Class work commenced on June twenty-seventh with work as follows : 
June 27: Introductory talk on uses of books and value of system; June 
28-29: Selection of books; July 2-3: Children's reading and discussions 
by class of individual books and their uses; July 5-6 and 9: Accession- 
ing; July 10-20: Classification; July 20-27: Cataloging. Each student 
was required to make a complete catalog of twenty-five books, to keep for 
reference, this necessitating considerable work in cataloging outside of 
class hours. The entire time of the last week of the course was spent in 
Reference work. Bulletins, and Charging systems. Throughout the 
course fifteen minutes of every class hour was spent in the discussion of 
the books in the Commission's working library. Students were al- 
lowed and urged to take one or more books home with them each day 
and prepare to discuss them in class on the following day. In this way, 
it was felt that each student gained from the course a reasonable and 
discriminating knowledge of the cai-efully selected library of one hun- 
dred and fifty books. 

Certificates were given to each student completing the course in a 
satisfactory manner and six weeks credit in the regular normal c 
was granted. 



NORTHERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, MARQUETTE. 
OuvE C. I.^THROP, Instructor. 

The course in Library Methods was duly opened June 26, the day 
following registration. The first two weeks were devoted to accessioning 
and classification. Sample accession sheets were distributed and books 
from the Commission's working library used to illustrate the principtesi 
The condensed classification leaflets printed by the Commission were 



REPORT OF LIBRARY INSTITUTES. 17 

giveu out and the classifleatioa ^xplaioed, witb reference to th^ abridged 
and complete Dewey ejetem. The cljiss were required to memorize the 
main dh-iaions. Practice in clnssification was given from the booliB in 
the working library. Book nnnibers were included with this subject, 
both the so-called 1, 2, 3 system and the two-figure Cutter tables. 

Selection of bookB, Children's reading and Picture bulletins occupied 
the third and part of the fourth week. The first two subjects indicated 
the class of books most desirable iu a school library, the best editions for 
library use, discussed good and bad illustration in children's books and 
included a list of books to be read in class by grades, and at home. 
Lists, such as the A. L. A. catalog. Miss Hewin's List of books for 
boys and girls, Miss Prentice's Children's libraries, etc., were dis- 
played and compared. As a test the class were requested to compile a 
list of twenty-five books from the lists mentioned above, giving pub- 
lisher and price, lists to be suited to children below the high school. 

At the lecture on picture bulletins the members of the class iu Pri- 
mary Methods, about twenty, w«re present. Sample bulletins prepared 
in advance, on various subjects such as Christmas, Spring, George Wash- 
ington and other interesting topics, as well as advertising posters sent 
by the eastern publishers for recent and popular books, were displayed. 
Many of them were in bright colors and made a cheerful effect though 
the fact that the walls of the room were covered with blackboards, leav- 
ing no space for wall decoration, necessarily detracted from the artistic 
effect. Mention was made of the various varieties of inexpensive pic- 
tures, including addresses and prices. Memlters of the class brought 
views of the copper and other niiuernl districts from the Upper Penin- 
sula. Mounts were discussed and su^estions made as to arrangement 
of pictures and lists for the picture bulletins, which seem to appeal 
particularly to the teacher, as the idea of catching and holding the 
child's interest by means of pictures is made so much of in present-day 
school work. 

The latter part of the week a lecture was given on reference books 
suited to a very small library. This consisted of annotations of the list 
of reference books printed by the Commission, and was followed by an 
hour devoted to practical work along reference lines. 

One day in the week was occupied by a talk on binding, rebinding and 
repairing. The names of various materials in cloth and leather used 
in bindings were given, with comment on the ones giving the best satis- 
faction. Stress ^'as laid on durable rather than upon flue bindings. 
The difference between hand-bound and machine-bound books was brought 
out and the two processes explained. The talk included hints on repair- 
ing worn books. 

The last two weeks of the course were entirely devoted to cataloging. 
Owing to the shortness of the time alloted. instruction was made as 
simple as possible. Much of the detail which in a longer course would 
have been included was of necessity eliminated, and stress laid upon only 
the main essentiats. Main or author enti^ (illustrated by simple 
author entry, pseudonymous, anonymous and corporate entry), was 
explained and examples cited. Cross i-eferences, title cards and simple 
subject cards were explained. As in other subjects books from 
the working library were used to illustrate the various points. Each 
student made a sample catalog for herself. Some work in analyticals 



18 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

vras given, but the time was too siiort for a satisfactory cour8e in this 
important branch of cataloging. 

Owing to conditions peculiar to tlie Upper Peninsula, where the town- 
ship rather than the district is the unit, thus limiting the number of 
rural schools and to the fact that the course was arranged too late to be 
included in the printed announcements of the Normal, as well as to the 
fact that no credit was given for the work, the class was small, con- 
sisting of but seven menittors, but such was the enthusiasm, it is felt 
that the results may \te more tiian commensurate with the size of the 
class. The crowded condition of the buildings made it impossible to 
have a room for placing the bulletins and other illustrative features of 
the course on permanent exhibition. This necessarily limited the in- 
terest in and usefulness of the materials. However, everything possible 
was done by the Normal faculty to make the work pleasant and success- 
ful. The working librarj- supplied by the Commission, in many ways 
a model collection, attracted much attention, particularly from the 
teachers interested in selection of children's books. 



PROSPECTUS OF A SIX WEEKS' COURSE IN LIBRARY TRAINING TO BB 
GIVEN IN THE NORMAL SCHOOLS. JUNE 24-AUGUST 2, 1907. 

The course in Library Methods will extend through the six weeks of the 
Summer School. Students completing the course will be given credit. 

lostruction will be given in the form of lectures. These will be fol- 
lowed by practical work with books from the commission's working 
library of several hundred volumes. At least one hour each day will be 
required for credit, with additional work outside at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

Miss Salisbury's "Library Methods for School Teachers" will be used 
as the text book supplemented by references to standard works on li- 
brai-y economy. 

Order Work— Includes use of trade- catalogs, preparation of order 
lists, checking bills, etc. 

.-Vccessioning — Practice work in recording books in accession record. 

riassification — A simplified form of the IJewey Decimal Classification 
will I>e used as the basis of instruction, with reference to the more ex- 
panded forms. 

Book Numbers — Two schemes of books numbers will be explained: 
the so-called ]^ 2, 3, system suitable for the smallest collection of books, 
and the Cutter 2 figure tables for more detailed arrangement. 

Cataloging — Instruction will be given in elementary cataloging, includ- 
ing author, title and simple subject entries, analyticals and cross refer- 
ences. 

Selection of Books — Includes priiiciples of selection of both adult and 
children's books. Students will be required to compile lists of iwoks from 
the various aids to book selection. 

Childi-en's Reading— Importance of dii-ecting choice in reading. Value 
and place of special classes of children's books. 

Picture Bulletins — Purpose and use in schools. Principles of making, 
moimting and displaying pictures, 

Keference Work — List of reference books desirable for small library 



REPORT OF LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 19 

are printed by tlie Commission, This subject will include Boch docu- 
ments, governinenf, state, or municipal, as are needed in a school library; 
where and how they may be obtained. 

Binding — Includes materials used in binding, their cost and durabil- 
ity, also rebinding and mending of worn books, 

Charging System — Simple systems for loaning books will be explained. 

It is the intention of tlie Commission to arrange for several additional 
tectnpes to be given during the course by specialists in the various 
branches of librarv work. 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 

LIBRARY CONDITIONS IN THE UPPER PENINSULA. 

By Jons A. Doeli^, Slperistendent op Schools, HouohtoNj Mich. 

Before entering upon discussion of library conditions in the Upper 
Peninsula as compared with the Lower, I deem it advisable to state 
briefly what, in the opinion of those quali&ed to judge, constitutes the 
social difference Itetween the two peninsulas. 

Any one traveling from St. Ignace to Houghton cannot forget the 
feeling of isolation experienced as they pass over the almost intermin- 
able stretches of swamp land between St. Ignace and Marquette, and the 
rocky, barren stretches between the latter city and Houghton. From the 
latter town west to Ironwood and south to Menominee, the same thing 
is always true. Isolation is the one thought uppermost in the traveler's 
mind. Until the agricultural possibilities of the Upper Feninsula be- 
gin to be appreciated, this condition will exist. 

Another fact that forcibly impresses itself upon the resident of the 
Lower Peninsula is the large number of foreigners seen everywhere. The 
mining population is composed chiefly of foreigners. The taciturn Finns 
work side by side with the demonstrative hordes from Italy. 

The two facts spoken of above are clearly hindrances to the extension 
of library influences. There is, however, a counterbalancing influence in 
the fact that nowhere is money voted so freely for education and its 
allied interests as in the Upper Peninsula. Anyone who doubts this fact 
needs hut to compare the school buildings and equipment with those 
in cities of similar size in the Lower Peninsula. 

Notwithstanding this spirit of liberality evinced by the taxpayers, 
the fact remains that very few counties in the Upper Peninsula can boast 
of having brought inspiring books within the reach of their children. 
On examining reports received from the county commissioners of schools, 
I find but one county claiming that none of its schools are without li- 
brary privileges of some sort, Dickinson county deserves credit for its 
excellent report. But. on the other hand, one county commissioner says 
that 60% of bis schools are not provided with books. On an average, 
331^% of the s<'hools in the Upper Peninsula are struggling along witli- 
out the helpful influence of a library. _ , , ^.. 

Put in figures, we find less than 25 libraries in each county. ^\^eu this 



20 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

is compared with soutliern Afichigaii counties, we find ourselves sadlv 
lacking. This diBcrepancy can be explained by the fact that there are 
a great manj township school systems in the Upper Peninsula as com- 
pared with the Lower, In order to find out whether the township li- 
braries are being used by the schools, we addressed a circular of inquiry 
to the county commissioners. One-half reported the township library 
plan successful, because it accorded with the township school unit. The 
rest regarded these libraries as useless; the chief objection being inac- 
cessibility to the public, and poorly selected books. Unless the town- 
ship library loans books to its outlying schools, the objection of inac- 
cessibility is valid. For instance, in Luce county, one school is reported 
thirty miles from any library. In Portage township, Hongbtoi; county, 
two schools are twenty-five miles from the administrative headquarters 
of the township. These facts will ilhistrate the isolation we spoke of in 
the beginning of this article. 

What are the educational authorities in the counties doing to bring 
the advantages of the library before the taxpayers, and also to utilize, 
to the fullest extent the present privileges? Let me quote from the year 
book issued by the county commissioner of Alger couuty. I will omit 
the statistics, and give the comment thereon: "An Train Township 
" " • Since making the above report, word has been received thafAu 
Train has enlarged its library by twenty-four new volumes. Au Train's 
library money goes where it belongs," "Limestone Township • • • 
Limestone Township deserves great credit for the library spirit mani- 
fested by its citizens. In point of population. Limestone stands sixth 
in the county; but in number of books in its library, it stands second." 
"Mathias Township • • • Mathias should increase the number of 
volumes to at least one hundred this year. This would entitle its library 
to a set of the Michigan Pioneer and Historical Collection, containing 
thirtv-three volumes of verv valuable reference reading. Why not qualify 
for it?" 

If every county commissioner were as zealous, the question would be 
solved. This commissioner says township libraries are a success and 
well patronized- 

Many schools have used the traveling lil)rarie9 furnished by the 
state, and invariably with good success. I trust I may be pardoned for 
mentioning the work that we have done in Portage Township. Houghton 
county, to bring library privileges to the home of every one. Many 
years ago the township library had been open to the public; but, for 
some reason or other, it fell into disuse. The books were molding in the 
basement of the school building, and the general public of Houghton 
was entirely without reading matter. (The Michigan College of Mines 
Library is a special one and not open to the public.) Thus we had the 
condition of having n village with five thousand inhabitants, and a 
township with practically five thousand more, destitute of any library 
privileges. The school board had liberally provided for books in the 
high school, but these were not used by the public. 

In the county treasurer's hands tiiei-e were over seren hundred dollars 
waiting to be used as soon as it could be properly used. The Board of 
Education was not slow in realizing its opportunity. A room was set 
apart for library purposes. Shelves were built, library furniture pur- 
chased, and the suijcriutondput of schools was authorized to purchase 



REPORT OF LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 21 

four hundred dollars' worth of new books. The people of Houghton are 
anxiously looking forward to the opening of thia, their only public li- 
brary. 

The outlying schools have not been forgotten. We have two schools 
twenty-five miles from Houghton, and one five miles out. Upon ap- 
. plication to the State Librarian, we were gladly granted the use of three 
traveling libraries. The teachers invariably report success. The child- 
ren, in many cases, take the books botne to read to their parents, who 
hear no English except such as is spoken and read to them by their 
children. Do we not owe a duty to these parents? The school Ameri- 
canizes the children, but we must look to the combined effort of the 
school and the press to Americanize the parents. 

In closing I cannot refrain from giving some suggestions that were 
made to me for the improvement of our library conditions: One com- 
missioner suggests that a special man be detailed from the department 
of education to look after our library interests. Another suggestion is 
that the township libraries be abolished and the County Board of Kxam- 
iners be granted the power to select books for district libraries. This 
suggestion cannot be taken seriously when over half of the commission- 
ers report the township library as the most useful. It seems to me that 
instead of giving the selection of books to the County Board of Examin- 
ers, it should be given, as in Wisconsin, to county, district and city sup- 
erintendents of schools. I am not ready to admit that our laws need any 
changing. Judging from what is done in some counties, it indicates that 
well directed effort counts, no matter what the laws may be. Penal 
fines have not always been used properly, if the commissioners' reports 
are to be believed. 

I>et us take a few figures from the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion's report for 1905. Comparing Dickinson and Houghton counties, 
we find that the population of the former in 1904 was 18,936 ; of the lat- 
ter, 70,265. Dickinson received from its county treasurer fines amount- 
ing to ^,912.17, while Houghton county received only fl,921.16. 
Houghton county paid for the support of district libraries |2,885,41 and 
Dickinson, |5,248J28. Dickinson county, considering its population, 
received approximately ten times more money than Houghton county. 
Either the school inspectors are at fault in their reports, or the law is 
misunderstood. The apparent carelessness in carrying out this law re- 
lating to penal fines is a matter that should be investigated by the de- 
partment. Above all, we must have men and women alert in utilizing 
their present opportunities. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



CLINTON COUNTY. 

Sylvia E. H.\L8Ey, Org-vsizeh. 

St. Johns. 

After interviews witl) tlie commissioner of sciiools and tlie director of 
the district I began my work in Clinton county in my own district No. 7 
Fractional Bingham and Olive. 

The sixty-eight volumes composing the library were nearly new 
and nearly all in excellent condition. The dictionary was one of the ex- 
ceptions. The binding was in good condition, but I found so many of tbe 
pages so badly mutilated that I fear that I have 8i>ent more time than is 
profitable on the book. 

Besides the supplies sent me by the Board of Library Commissioners 
I have received both black and white mending tissue, also have received 
two pieces of transparent adhesive paper. 

Our books ai-e kept on what was an open bookcase. They were, how- 
ever, given some protection by curtains. These we have freshened by 
cleaning. 

I have repaired, accessioned, classified, labeled, made a shelf list and a 
dictionary catalogue for the 08 books. Have also introduced the charg- 
ing system. 

The work here seems incomplete as there are also Township library 
books in the school. 

A cloth bound note book with leather corners was purchased for 
twenty-five cents. This was properly ruled and used for accessioning. 
General rules for accessioning as given by Miss Wright at Mt. Pleasant 
were written in the book. 

I have been to DeWitt, but both the teachers were out of town so did 
not see them to talk of the library work. I saw the director, however, 
and talked with him. Have written the principal asking when we could 
talk of the work. 



EATON COUNTY. 



Florence M. Reck, Oro.vnizeh. 



This library is in the district school, whei-e I am teaching. The 
director gave me permission to do as I i)leaKed with the books. The 
books are of a good class, and are in very good shape. I have classified 
and re-arranged the books and put tliem in good order. It is almost im- 
possible to interest the director in library work, altho he has promised 
to give the matter his attention. The books are kept in ^ ( ^'*f i", fiWJ 
book case, and are in constant use. i i-?i • ^ 



REPORT OF LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 



DiMON'DALE Windsor Township Libbabv. 

Mr. Underhill, tlie township clerk, gave me pennissioD to work in the 
library and I spent November ISthnnd 2-ltli tliere. The books are kept 
at the librarian's home in a room set aside for that purpose. Some of 
the books were in very poor condition. Those, with some which I 
thought not fit to be in circulation, I advised the librarian to destroy. 
The books were arranged in no regular order. Ilistories, juvenile books, 
and fiction being all mixed in together. I arranged and classified the 
whole library and tried to make them see the necessity of a catalog, but 
they did not feel that Hiey could have one just at present. 

MiLLETT District School Librakv. 

The directors of the Millett school, Mr. Wardel! and Mr. Runyant. 
gave me permission to do any necessary work in their school library. I 
8[>ent Saturday, October 20tti, there. They have two hundred books, 
about half of which were fiction. They had never been claasitied or 
cataloged, and were arranged in no definite order. I classified most of 
the books, cataloged some of them and instructed the librarian in the 
work, so that she will be able to finish it. 

They will not get a card catalog at present, but I think they will get 
material for the Brown chatting system. They have an accession record. 



GEXESliK COUNTY. 

C, M. Elliott. Okganizer. 

Clio. 

I have the work of organization and classification of our library here 
at Clio well under way, and have In-gun work on the libraries of the vil- 
lage schools at Montrose, Mt. Morris and Ooodrich. As the time which 
I can devote to the work is very limited, I can not cover the ground very 
rapidly. 

HOUGHTON COUNTY. 
John A, Doei-lg, Organizer, 

T have not done anything outside of our own school, but have done 
considerable work in our own library. 

When school 0{>ened this fall we found ourselves poa«e»Mi'd of about 
2,000 books scattei-ed around iu different i)lafeB. Many books were lost 
each year and then the service we rendered was insignificant. The 
library was a school library and as such used only by the {)upils. 

We have made the following changes. Wet a]»art « separate room for 
library purposes, fitted with shelves, extra lights, all necessary furni- 
ture from the Library Itui-eau at Chicago, The hooks are to be collected 
in this room, classified according to the Pewey system. 

We have made it a jmblic library, oi«'n from 3 to 'A:'iO each day. and in 
charge of a librarian. 



24 REPORT OF BOARD OP LIBRARY COMHISSIONEIRS. 

We have purchased f400.00 vortli of good, new booka and have in- 
vested over 1200.00 in library equipraent including cards, case for same, 
desk, embossing seal, etc. 

The people of the town have expressed their appreciation of the 
changes that have been made. We have no public library here so this 
school library will mean a great deal to the residents of the township. 

Our plan is to add to this each year, and make out lists of each grade. 
Then in the ward buildings we expect to place so many books at the 
beginning of each school year and change every three or four months. 



MACOMB COUNTY. 
Elizaheth Pomekov, Organizer. 



Has a free public library of about 1,200 volumes in good, general con- 
dition and located in the village of Armada; also a school library there. 

Bruce. 

The village of Borneo has a good large school library, containing 
a well selected class of reference books for school use and also a depart- 
ment of general literature for circulation throughout the school district, 
the books being loaned ever>- Friday p. m. 

There are also four libraries from the State Library for the use of 
the four clubs there, 

Chesterfield, 

The village of New Baltimore has a school library and there are several 
district school libraries for the use of the scholars and residents of the 
respective districts. I do not know of any township or other library 
there. 

Clixtox. 

The city of Mt. Clemens has a free public library and can learn of no 
other in the township. 

Erin. 

No definite information has been learned but it is understood that 
library privileges in Erin are very limited. 



There is one small library in this township and it is kept at the home 
of the librarian. My informant doea not state how it is supported and 
says there are no school libraries that he knows of. 



The township has a library of about 200 volumes in the hands of the 
township clerk and the village of New Haven has about 150 books 
in the school library used, in school work onlv. 



REPORT OP LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 



Macomb. 

There is a club library located at Meade. This library bas been oi^an- 
ized Dearly nineteen years, has been and still is in tlonrishing condition 
as stated by tbe Secretary. Their society is composed of sixty members, 
and they have over 500 volumes, among which are several sets by 
standard authors — Dickens, Scott, etc. 

Ray. 

No library of any sort reported except the traveling libraries secured 
by the Farmers'. Club. 

Richmond. 

In Richmond and Memphis, the two towns in Richmond township, no 
libraries are reported other than the school libraries. That in Rich- 
mond is used by the pupils only; in the Memphis library the parents are 
allowed the use of the books, but the teacher there tells me that very 
little interest is shown. 

Shelby. 

Tbe village of Utica bas a school library which is used only by the 
pupils. The Tuesday Club has a traveling library, used only by the mem- 
bers, and membership is limited to thirty. 

Sterling. 
No libraries reported here except the oues in the district schools. 



The same conditions as in Sterling. 

Washington. 

The village of Washington has a school library but no other, and this 
is used only by the pupils. 

LENAWEE COUNTY. 

Helen J, Mill«fal-gii, Ohganizeh. 
Clinton. 

During the year, our free district library has been classified and 
cataloged, adding much to the efficiency. We have also had a traveling 
library sent us from the State Library, and expect with the new year, 
to add flOO worth of new books to onr shelven. Efforts have also been 
made to start libraries in near districts, but with little success so far. 
The teachers are interested, however, and that means success in the 
future. D3nz.,,>L.OOglC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



MARQUETTE COUNTY. 
Rose Patesai'de, Organizek. 
Chocolav Township Library. 

The library ia in charge of the secretary of the Bchool board. A 
iiieetiug of the Township Board will be necessary to grant me the per- 
mission needed. The library is not cataloged, has no cinsaiflcation 
whatever and no accession book. The number of volumes is 1,200. with 
very few non-fiction works and no good reference books. The fiction 
comprises nearly the whole, and the library is not of a high order. 

The secretary will add |75.00 worth of books ver^' soon. I advised as 
to what lists to eonsnlt. etc. The librarv is open on Saturday after- 
noons, and the circulation is but twelve volumes per week. I also gave 
for the benefit of the library copies of the lists sent me. 

District >'o, 1. 

January. January 18th, I went to District No. 1, and spent the en- 
tire day at the school house, where the books of the District school li- 
brary are kept. 

The teacher, who is a Xormal student, has had charge of the library 
for the past three years. The school building is isolated and the teacher 
gets back and forth from the nearest farm house, where she boards, (Hi 
snow shoes. The officials have provided an oak book case with glass 
front for the books. There are twenty-flve volumes of good fiction, very 
well selected, as is also the balance of the collection of 84 volumes. 
The District has about 1^0 volumes, but I found only 84 to be cata- 
loged. The others are supidementary readers and text books woni out, 
or nearly so, and not intended as part of the library proper. I assigned 
the call numbers, labeled a few for illustration, began entries in the 
accession book and started a card catalog, giving instruction to the 
teacher who will continue the work begun. She is a bright and enthus- 
iastic worker and expects to take up the summer library course at the 
Normal. 

I left for use 200 catalog cards from the supply sent me; also a set of 
guide cards. 

Marquette Citv Public School LiBnAUY. 

I have finished the work of organizing the Marquette Public School 
Library of about 450 volumes. 

Three hundred and twenty were accessioned and classified. The work 
is to be continued by the office assistant, who teaches during the fore- 
no(m. 

The work progi'esaed slowly, as I was unable to get all the iMwks 
together and was obliged to take them wlien not in use hy pupils or 
teachers. The hooks being scattered in lots through the building.^for 
instance, the Domestic Science department had a collection, also the 



REPORT OF LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 27 

nitiDiial traiDing, the Physics room, high sdiool room, etc., most of my 
work was done in the superintendeut's office. The BUjierintendent is 
now having tlie books stamped as i^ceived at tlie office. Last year, he 
made a fair start hy having an author and title list prepared on cards 
and he is still doing the best possible nnder the circumstances; for no 
time has been allowed for work of this character. 



OAKLAND COrXTY. 

iUnv E. Hattos, Organizer. 

Birmingham Hioii School. 

Library is in fairly good condition, with fillfl volames, but having no 
ratalog nor systematic classification. This library is well kept; books 
are shelved in cases. Supt. A. E. Bellis agreed to give the matter his at- 
tention and present it to the board. 

Farmington High School. 

Library of 100 volumes (25 volumes newly purchased) has been equip- 
ped with card catalog and Dewey classification, and a loan of 100 vol- 
umes, from the Board of Library Commissioners added. 

Faemington' Towxship. 

Library of 800 to 900 volumes to be converted into traveling libraries 
and circulated among the school districts of the township after January 
1st. (This plan has not been definitely outlined by the Board of School 
Inspectors.) 

Holly High School. 

Library of 400 volumes is classified and has a partial catalog. 
HoLLV Ladies* Library. 

Library of 2OO0 volumes has l>een converted into a Public Library. 
Books to be classified and cataloged after January 1st. 1907. 

RociiKsTER High School. 

Library of COO to 700 volumes, to \w equi]ii>ed with Dewey classifica- 
tion and card catalog after January 1st. 

BoYAL Oak High School. 

Library of 100 to 200 volumes, to l>e equipited and cata]<»ged after 
January Ist. (Not definite.) 

RovAi. Oak Township. 

Library of 1500 volumes neither clnssified nor cataloced. Presented 
the subject to the librarian of this libiary, who will endeavor to interest 
the town board of school inHi>ectors: als4» «aw Mrs, Xewman, President 
of Woman's Club, in regard to the matter. 



28 REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

OCEASA COUNTY. 

May D. Root, Organizer. 
Shelby. 

Since taking the summer course id Library Science at Ypsilanti, I 
have worked on our school district library and have succeeded in ac- 
cessioning, classifying, and labeling our library of about 216 volumes. 
Since I have finished that, we have received our share of the township 
library — and about 300 volumes will be in fit condition to place in our li- 
brary-. These I have partly classified and labelled and hope to finish 
them soon after our Christmas vacation and make a card catalog of all 
by the end of the school year. 

I have received a letter from Mies Doty, of Hart, asking me to organize 
the County Normal Library there, sometime after the holidays. 

VAN BUREN COUNTY. 

Grace B. Norton, Organizer. 

Hartford. 

I can report little in the line of library work. I have accessioned 
the books in the County Normal Library (about eighty volumes) in a 
handmade accession book. I have been thinking of writing for supplies 
for this work, if you think so small a library worth the trouble. 

Kendall. 

Velma U. Hall, Organizer. 

Following the instructions which I received at the summer institute, 
I have organized our own library; but have had no time to give any as- 
sistance to others in our vicinity. 

EEPOKTS OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 

University of Michigan. 

Theodore Wesi-EY Koch. Librarian. 

Summary of Annual report 190506, 

In April, 1904. I was asked to come to the library of the University of 
Michigan. At that time I was connected with the Library of Congress, it 
was therefore impossible for me to take up my new work at once. For 
several months I continued to reside in Washington, but gave half of liiy 
time to arrangements looking towards the acquisition of a depository 
Catalogue of the Library of Congress cards, the purchase of a set of the 
John Crerar Library cards and the card publications of the American 



REPORT OP ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 29 

Library ABBOciation, the purchase of catalogue easea. the designing of 
a book-plate for the University Library, etc. I also made a tour of the 
eastern libraries with a view to studying certain questions which were 
sure to call for answers at Ann .\rbor. During the mid summer I spent 
a fortnight here and arranged for the alphabetization and installation of 
the Library of Congress depository catalogue whi.ch had arrived from 
Washington. I also made a provisional rearrangement of tables and 
rases in the reading room which allowed us to place a thousand or more 
reference books within immediate reach of the students. 

Among my first recommendations was the building of shelves around 
the semi-circnlar wall of the reading room, to contain accommodations 
for about 5,000 volumes over and above what were already in place. This 
was duly granted and the work was done during the Christmas vacation. 
The shelving was designed to conform to the height of five cabinets 
which had been built in the summer of 1902 to cover the new ventilating 
shafts. The tops of these cabinets were used as pedestals to hold five 
large busts of Bancroft, Agassiz, Longfellow, Scott and Beethoven, 
presented by Regent White. On both sides of two of the cabinets, dic- 
tionary rests were constructed. This served to give the ventilators free 
play and also to break up the monotony of 150 feet of nnbroken shelving. 
An academic touch was added by the use of shields lalternating with 
escutcheons) at the top of every other standard of the casing and bearing 
the seals of twenty-two American and European colleges and universi- 
ties. Above these were centei-ed portraits of former presidents and pro- 
fessors of the University, together with some portraits of well known 
scholars and statesmen transferred from the over-crowded Art Gallery. 

KSTABLISHMBST OF THE REFERENCE LlHRAKY. 

One of the first problems to which my attention was called on tak- 
ing up the work here was the congestion of students at the delivery desk 
immediately after the hourly change of classes. This was caused by 
the students coming to the library after a lecture and rushing to the 
desk with call slip for books to which their professors had just referred 
them. The solution of the difficulty was the natural one of giving the 
students free access to the majority of these Iwoks by placing the vol- 
umes on open shelves. The new cases built around the room enabled us 
to do this during the months of -January and February, 190.^. Many of 
these books of required collateral reading had been furnished by the 
fittidents themselves, each member of a class paying twenty-five cents 
toward the purchase of extra copies for the library in order to supply 
the demand.* These volumes, together with strictly reference books 
and certain standard works, formed the nucleus of the reference library. 

The reference library now numbers over 0,000 volumes including 
the collection of indexes grouped on shelves near the card catalogue and 
the delivery desk. A separate card catalogue (duplicating the entries in 
the public catalogue) was made for the whole reference library and for 
a time was kept in a case in the centre of the reading room. It was 
found, however, that the students made little or no use of it and that 
they always went to the main catalogue. Conseqiiently the rase con- 
taining this special reference catalogue was moved to the e»st~.endnf the 

•TW»pr»flice w - ■- ' - 



30 REPORT OF B0.4RD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

deliverv desk wUere. in conjunction with tlie shelf list of this collection, 
it has been found very belpful by the desk attendants in answering qnes- 
tions and locatin;; books. 

The establishment of the reference library was most cordially wel- 
comed by the faculty. Several professors claim to have found a no- 
ticeable improvement, in the grade of work done by their students since 
they were granted freer access to books. Certainly the change in 
methods of instruction during the last decade or two rendered necessary 
some corresponding changes in the administration of the library. 

liB-^rXlFICVTIOX OF THE RE.*niNG RoOXI. 

During the midwinter the regents authori7.ed the purchase of plaster 
casts of Donatello's cantoria frieze and eight of the Luca della Robbia 
panels from the organ loft in the Cathedral of Florence. By piecing 
out the Donatello frieze at either end with one panel by I>ella Robbia 
nnd two plain slabs, a harmonious composition was formed of sufficient 
length to hide from view the unattractive iron railing which fronted 
the balcony over the delivery desk. The six brackets supporting this 
balcony divided the wall behind the desk into seven sections, the middle 
one occupied by a clock and the end ones (over the doora leading to the 
stack) being narrower than the other five. In the six unoccupied sec- 
tions, bracket moldings were built to support the I>ella Robbia panels, 
which were then grouped with a view to the composition as a whole 
and in relation to the frieze overhead. Thus the two series, originally 
designed for opposite ends of the Duomo by artists working independ- 
ently, have been brought into what has been conceded to be a harmoni- 
ous unit, even though it perforce disregards what is now known to have 
l>een the order of the Della Robbia panels. The balcony in our reading 
room, although slightly higher than the organ loft for which these reliefs 
were originally designed, serves admirably for the display and helps to 
give the effect of the original cantoria as planned by those Renaissance 
masters. 

As a further experiment in relieving the walls of their bareness, I 
secured- ivory-tinted casts of four consecutive sections of the Parthenon 
frieze. These were placed on the west wall of the east tower, resting on 
a molding which runs around the entire reading room. The effect was 
BO generally liked that I was authorized to secure enough of the frieze 
to cover the opposite wall, as well as to extend it around the north side 
of these tower walla. After considerable measuring and study, a series 
of consecutive sections to lit in these places was worked out and their 
correct relative position was preserved. 

The removal of chairs from The outer circle of tables in the reading 
room to leave a sufficiently wide passageway for easy access to the re- 
ference shelves built against the wall. left 270 seats at the tables, rather 
closely crowded. The number of women using the library has nearly 
e(|ualled that of the men, and there has l>een less segregation of the 
wxes since the establishment of the refei-ences shelves. From an adminis- 
trative point of view this is jiarticulariy gratifying, as it is desirable 
to have these books used at tables near the shelves on which they be- 
long. Heretofore the men invariably sat on the west side and the women 
on the east side of the i-eading room, and any infraction of this unwVit- 



REPORT OP ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 31 

ten atodent rule by a new etudent was sure to call fopth unmistakable 
signs of disapproval on the part of the men. Groups of men, however, 
can now be seen any day over on the east side of the room at work at the 
tables near the slielvee containing the selected books on history. 

"Probably owing in part to the influt-nee of more tasteful surround- 
ings, as well as to an improved student sentiment," Mr. Finney reports, 
"the order in the reading rooms has been better and the number of mu- 
tilations of hooks and periodicals less than in previous years." This 
bears out my prediction of two years ago when I first argued for the 
beautification of the reading room and the freer access for students to 
books, 

Opexing of the Periodical Room. 

The east room on the ground floor has at different times served for 
a lecture room, for the storage of plaster casts and for bound volumes 
of newspapers. Of recent years the current files of periodicals received 
by the Genera! Library were kept there in pigeon holes running around 
three sides of the room, and presumably from a sort of lucus a non 
lui-endo reasoning the place was called the Faculty Reading Room. The 
north end had been blocked off by a case for bound volumes of news- 
papers and the space behind this used for making up the material for 
binding. In January, 1905, this end of the room was cleared of all but 
the pigeon holes, and the arrangement of the periodicals changed from 
an alphabetical to a subject grouping. Beginning at the left of the en- 
trance from the hallway, the periodicals wei-e grouped according to the 
classification in vogue in the stacks. Printed labels in sheet brass hold- 
ers replaced the manuscript tabs on the different pigeon holes. Several 
additional tables were secured from other parts of the campus and 
chairs which could be spared from the outer row of desks in the read- 
ing roopi (owing to the erection of book shelves facing these desks) 
were put into the new periodical room. This gave a seating capacity of 
thirty. Permission to open the room to the students was granted at 
the January meeting of the board. The table farthest removed from 
the door was reserved for members of the faculty and this has been found 
to answer all needs. Later on a newspaper rack was installed and the 
daily papers which had hitherto been kept in the librarian's oflBce and 
filed in the stack wei-e then placed where the public could have free ac- 
cess to tbem. A desk was provided in the n>oni for the assistant who 
had charge of the current files of periodicals and she was given charge 
of the room. Her presence there was considered as a safeguard against 
vandalism and her desk has been a bureau of information for readers 
in regard to periodicals in general. 

We have recently added a display rack for the current numbers of 
the popular maga7.ines, each of which is kept in a binder and its proj)er 
place in the rack indicated by a copy of the cover placed under plate- 
glass. The indexes to the popular periodicals (Poole's Reader's Guide, 
etc.) have been transferred from a table in the reading room to the per- 
iodical room because of the space in the reading room being needed for 
other work. 

Semiswry Rooms. 

The seminary rooms, to which are admitted all graduate students, and 
such upper classmen as are doing advance work in language ai^-Htera- 



32 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

ture, in history or in economics, have been overcrowded for .veara. Wliile 
the establish meDt of the reference library has reduced someniiat the 
average attendance in the seminary rooms by undergraduate students 
who find on the shelves in tlie reading room many of the books needed 
by them, yet the number of applicatioiis for the assignment of seats in 
the seminary rooms continues to grow. 

ESTABLISDMENT OF A ChARGISO DeSK. 

One result of the reorganization of the reading room force, authorized 
by the Board of Regents at their meeting in June, 1905, was the creation 
of a new position, that of charging clerk, whose chief duties are to see 
that all books taken from the librai'v are represented by a card properly 
made out and signed by the borrower, and that books are promptly dis- 
charged upon th^r return to the library. This was found necessary in 
order to systematize the constantly increasing work of the loan desk 
even before the extension to students of the privilege of borrowing 
books. 

Student Circilatios. 

In 1856 the privilege of borrowing books from the library of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan was taken away from the students; in February, 1906 
(a half-century later) it was restored to them. In the early history of 
the University of Michigan, as in other educational institutions, the li- 
brary was open but a few hours per week. Consequently it was thought 
necessary for the students to have the privilege of taking books to their 
rooms. Students were comparatively few in number and the demand 
for books was not very heavy. With the increase in the number of stu- 
dents and the consequent larger demand on the' resources of the library, 
the hours of opening were lengthened but the privileges of the under- 
graduates were curtailed. 

The question of extending to students the privilege of borrowing books 
for use in their own rooms had come up several times within the last 
dozen years. In his report for 1896 President Angell had urged the 
board to consider the feasibility of setting apart a certain number of 
books for student circulation: '"Believing that such use of certain 
books will be more advantageous to the readers," said he, "I have long 
looked forward to the time when it would be practicable for us to 
permit it. I have always thought that when the number of volumes 
approached 100,000 we might safely give this larger liberty to students 
under certain restrictions. • • • • The expense of the service at 
the desk may be a little increased. The risk of loss is perhaps some- 
what enhanced. But after all pi-oper weight is given to these facts, we 
have to remember that the library is the great central power in the 
instruction given in the University, and that the books are here not to 
be locked up and kept away from readers, hut to be placed at their 
disposal with the utmost freedom compatible' with safety and with the 
general and equal convenience of all students." 

One Semester's Expbbiesce. 

The statistics of the circulation department show that 1046 students 
availed themselves of the privilege and of the 4636 books taken out for 
home use from February 12th to June 2l8t (exclusive of the over-night 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 33 

circulation) fifty per cent belonged to English literature. Tlie figures 
Bbow tlie following autliors to have been the most frequently borrowed: 
Shakespeare, Hardy, Stevensou, Dickens, Kipling, Geot^ Eliot, Jane 
Austen, Hawthorne, and Thackery. Of the reniaiQing fifty per cent the 
circulation was divided as follows: 

Philosophy and religion 53-5% 

Sociology and economics 5% 

Education 2% 

Science 4% 

Medicine i% 

Fine arts and music \% 

German literature 5% 

Romance languages 8 2-5% 

I^tin and Greek 3% 

History 12% 

50% 

These figures are not to be taken as an indication of the relative 
amount of reading done in the different branches. In some depart- 
ments of study the reference use of books is much greater than in others; 
of this use the above figures have nothing to say. Nor do they take cog- 
nizance of the reading done in the seminaries and in the departmental 
libraries. 

In one semester during which we have been loaning books to students 
we have found that the extension to undergraduates of the privilege of 
borrowing books has cost us next to nothing in the way of additional 
service at the desk, that it has not interfered with the use of the library 
by the faculty, aud we do not believe that there is a single professor 
who would vote for the abolition of the newly granted privileges. 

That the students themselves value their newly acquii-ed privileges 
has been frequently attested by their individual expressions of appreci- 
tion. and by the use they have made of these privileges, but never more 
convincingly than in the Commencement numl)er of their literary paper, 
where among the things which in their opinion have made the year not- 
able are listed : 

"Haircutting abolished," 

"Football saved." 

"Yost becomes author and Benedict.'' 

"Circulation of library books established.'" 

When the qiiestion of library privileges looms up thus large in the 
student mind, who shall say that there is in it no room for aught hut 
athletics? 

Since the establishment of the circulation desk, the assistant in 
charge has frequently be<*n asked by students to recommeud some in- 
teresting books for home reading. In order to answer this class of 
questions and also to encourage the reading habit, we are installing this 
year on an exhibit rack near the delivery desk a changing collection of 
books selected with a view to interesting the students. The books will 
be marked by a red star ticket and known as the red star collection. By 
this means the charging clerk will know when a student brings up one of 



34 REPORT OP BOARD OP LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

these booka that tbore is (1) no reading room charge for the book, (2) 
that it is not to be renewed, and (3) that when returned, it is not to go to 
the etack. When tlie books seem no longer of immediate interest to bpr- 
rowers, they will be retired to the stack by simplj taking off the little 
paper red star and new tiooks brought out to take their place. 

The SHAKESPEAnE* and Drasiatic Collections. 

One of the largest special coileetions in the General Library is the 
McMillan Shakespeare Library which now contains in round numbers 
fiOfK) volumes. The establishment of the collection was made possible 
through the generosity of the late Henator James McMillan of l>etroit. 
who purchased and presented the University in 1KH2 the collection of 
75f> volumes which had been gathered by Colonel E. H. Thompson, of 
Flint. Mich. 

Senator McMillan continued to provide funds for enlarging the col- 
lection as favorable opportunities for purchase arose. When the ex- 
tensive Shakespeare library of Joseph Crosby of Zanesville, Ohio, came 
into the market, over four hundred additional volumes wore secured en 
hlor. For the past twenty-four years the auction sales in New York, 
Boston, and London have been watched for additional titles and many 
choice and rare accessions have been made in this way. Hundreds of 
catalogues of antiquarian booksellers in England, .\merica. Germany, 
Fraaee and Italy have been searched in the same way with like results. 
The current literature of the subject has been kept up to date so far 
as funds would permit, and the most important things have been pur- 
chased. Many volumes were secured in the early years that are now 
practically unobtainable on account of their rarity or the rapid advance 
in price. The collection as it now stands could not be replaced for sev- 
eral times the original cost, and the labor of coUeeting it would be now 
correspondingly greater. 

This library is very rich in editions of the works. The quartos are 
l)resont in Griggs' Facsimiles', All reproductions of the first folio thus 
far made are bei-e. The second, third and fourth folios are represented 
by good specimens of the original editions. There is a large (though not 
complete) collection of the so-called players' quartos. Beginning with 
Kowe's edition of 1709, all the editors are represented in their varying 
editions down to the present date, with rare exceptions. 

An excellent beginning has also been made in getting together editions 
of the separate plays and poems, though much remains to be done in this 
difficult line. 

The library contains translations of the Shakespeare text into twelve 
different languages, and includes a large body of German and French 
Shakespeariana. 

Aside from editions of the texts, there is also a very full representa- 
tion of the principal works of criticism and comment on the poet in 
English from the eighteenth century to the present time. It now seems 
as though this stream would never cease. 

Since Senator McMillan's death contributions have been generously 
made by his son, the Hon. William C, McMillan, of Detroit, for keep- 

• The account ot the Stiftkespemre collpcilon anp*areil In llie University at Michiean News — Letter 
No, 184, Jan. IS. 1906. . [C 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 35 

ing up the collection. During tlie past year be contributed flOO toward 
its mainteiiauce. The xtork of collection during all these years has de- 
volved almost entirely upon Professor I. N. Demmon, in which work he 
has always had the sympathetic cooperation of the librarian. 

A Retrospect. 

In closing ihis report I wish to express my sincere appivciation of the 
favorable consideration which the Board of Regents has given to the 
many recommendations which I have presented to it during the last 
two years, and of the kind welcome accorded to nie by the faculty, the 
library staff and especially by my predecessor. Without the freedom to 
experiment allowed nie during the year in which Mr. Davis and I 
shared the administrative duties of the office it would have been impos- 
sible to acconii)]ish what has been done. A less generous chief might 
have held in check some of the inovation introduced by his subordinate, 
but Mr. Davis never once hinted a doubt of the wisdom of the many 
changes that were introduced by me during that year. If I should reach 
the age of three scoi-e years and ten, I hope that I may be able to show 
the same charity and generosity towards younger men as my former 
ciiief bas shown towards me. Many of the things which I have been able 
to inaugurate \tM)u1d doubtless have been instituted by falm had the 
means been at his disposal; with the larger appropriations which have 
l)een granted the library we have been able to branch out into new lines 
and ti) pay moi-e attention to the question of the reading room service. 
With the larger staff allowed me. I have been able to relegate to capable 
assistants much routine work which formerly developed upon the 
librarian. In one of Mr. Davis' earlier reports, he said that those 
charged with the intei'csts of the Library regarded accumulation 
as the duty lying most heavily upon them. The burden of this duty 
fell heaviest upon Mr. Davis, and he should have been granted more help. 
How faithfully he served the institution you all know. It was he who 
built uj) the library to its present proportions; when he assumed the 
duties of his office the entire collection of books amounted to only 23,000 
volumes; when he relinquished the task there were 182,000 volumes. 
Naturally I, beginning where Mr, Davis left off, will face a different set 
of problems. To solve these jiroblems we shall need still larger appro- 
priations. That the library- of an institution of learning merits the 
closest attention, and the heartiest support, is becoming more and more 
generally recognized. "The American College," says President Thwing, 
"has in its library an instrument of mighty usefulness for serving man- 
kind. No wisdom is too practical, no consecration too hearty, no en- 
dowment too rich, to be devoted to its development. No house is too 
fair or too fine for holding its books, only provided the house facilitates 
their use. No administrative expense is too costly for making its re- 
sources more accessible. The library is worthy of the best, for it helps 
to make the liest in the student and the teacher." 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



ALBION PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Mrs. Euzabetii Fabnhau, Librarian. 

Our books are reacbing a claes wbo bave never had the privilege of 
reading. I think one-third of our lueinbership is juvenile, and they 
thoroughly enjoy the library. 

The Albion library was made public under the following condition: 
the ladies have control with an executive committee from the council. 
We were in hopes this year to have our appropriation of fSOO.OO in- 
creased, but did not succeed, ae the city is very much in debt. We try 
to divide our funds so as to make the most of them. We spend for books 
$150.00; for expenses — beating, lighting, etc., foO.OO (we have no rent to 
pay) ; and $100.00 for the librarian. We have the library open twice a 
week, three hours Tuesday and Saturday afternoon and evening. 

We are very much in need of l>ooks of reference, and in fact, if our 
membership increases, as it has in the past, we will bave to bave more 
books of all kinds. 



AN\ ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Nkm.ie S. Ix)ViSG, Librarian. 

Since the burning of the High School building where tbe library was 
located (Dec. 31, 1904) we have been given shelter in tbe M. E. church 
building and are greatly cramped in many ways. I have no new activ- 
ities to report, but, after a year or two in our new Carnegie building 
I trust that I may bave several encouraging ones. 

BAY CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

A. F. SfcDoXXELL. LmRAIlIAN. 

A new children's room is being fitted up in this library. We shall 
make our present children's room into a room for art and other rare 
books. The work was to Iiave been done I)efore Xovember. but owing 
to delay in the shops will not be finished until after tbe beginning of tbe 
new vear. We bave the same number of branch libraries that we had 
last year. 

BAY CITY, tf.VOE LIBRARY. 

I'UOEltt: P.\BKER, LlIfRARIAX. 

From various sources we know that other libraries arc doing won- 
derful things. We bave attempted some ourselves; but the results seem 
to point tbe moral that, when we win in the new things, we lose the 
things which do not shine in annual reports. 

There is one curious circumstance: a couple of years ago, our fiction 
was moved to the second floor and the shelves thrown open to the public. 



REPORT OP ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 37 

Of course, the orthodox, to-be-expected result would be a great increase 
in the fiction statistics; but, on tlie contrary, our fiction is steadily fall- 
ing off and there is a decided, though not quite equal gain in our Don- 
fietion statisticB. 

During the last month n-e have doubled the floor Bpace allotted to this 

open shelf room and added about 200 standard, non-fiction books, a dup- 
licate collection, and we are watching to see what will happen next. 

CALUMET & HRCLA MINING COMPANY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Mrs. M.\niE F. Gbiersox, Librarian. 

Adult Action circulated 34,141 

Adult non-flction circulated 14.076 

Adult foreign circulated 8,503 

Adult total circulated 56.720 

Juvenile Action circulated 37.937 

Juvenile non-fiction circulated 26,316 

Juvenile total circulated 64,263 

Total circulation 120,973 

Average circulation 397 

Largest circulation 829 

Smallest circulation 127 

b. Linden circulation ■ 5,687 

Magazine circulation— Calumet, 5,S90; L. Linden, 4,115; total 10,105 

Picture circulation 3,826 

Clipping circulation ' 391 

Total attendance in main reading-room 26,361 

Average attendance in main reading-room 74 

Largest attendance In main reading-room 186 

Smallest attendance in main reading-room 13 

Total attendance in children's reading-room 29,697 

Average attendance In children's reading-room 83 

Largest attendance in children's read-room 302 

Smallest attendance In children's reading-room 5 

Total attendance in Calumet reading- room b 56,058 

Average attendance tn Calumet reading-rooms 157 

Total attendance In L. Linden read-rooms 13,739 

Average attendance In L. Linden reading-rooms 39 

Cards issued— Calumet, 1.928: L Linden. 139; total 2,067 

Cards withdrawn— Calumet, 1,453; L. Linden, 73: total 1,526 

Hegistrat ion— Calumet, 6,500: L. Linden. 500: totil 7,000 

Percentage of fiction— adult Z2</,: juvenile, 3iy, : total 63^ 

ClRCLI-ATION Of PkTUKKS BV MoNTHS UlRINU THE YeAK EnDING 

Sept. 30, lOOfi. ■ 

October 527 

November 265 

December 375 

January 346 

February 438 

March 524 

Aiirll 392 

May 394 

July '.'."'.'.['.. '.'.\\.'.'.\. [[..'.'.'.. W. .",'.'.'.".'.'. ...... 

August 

September 

Total 



.igle 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



A.TTBNDANC1 IN ReADIN 



1 Rooms by Months During the Year Ending 
Sept. 30, 1906. 



October 3.105 

NOTember 2,766 

December 1,808 

Januarj' 1,900 

Pebruarr 2.234 

March 3.101 

April 3.535 

May 2.276 

June 1,360 

July i.na 

August 1.330 

September 2,773 

Total 26.361 



Ckildrens. 


Totol. 


3,340 


6,446 


3,166 


5.932 


2,303 


4.111 


2,487 


4.387 


3,083 


5,317 


4.054 


7.165 


2.313 


4.848 


1,564 


3,840 


1,530 




1,465 


3.638 


1.817 


3,147 


2,575 





29,697 



Books and Periodicals in Librarv. 

Total number of volumes in library September 30, 1905 23,243 

Volumes added during 1905-06 2.638 

Volumes withdrawn during 1905-06 397 2,241 

Total number of volumes Id library September 30, 1906 25,484 

Total number of pictures in Library September 30. 1906 7,607 

Total number or cllppingH In library September 30, 1906 2,953 

Magazines and newspapers — 

Main reading-room — Englleh, 94; foreign, 16; total 110 

Cbildren'B reading-room 13 

L. Linden reading-room 49 

Periodicals bound to complete flies 141 

Books rebound 811 

Books repaired in library 13,313 

Picture Bulletins, 

The use of picture bulletins to oommemorate great events, holidays aod 
seasons, and birthdays of noted lueu and wonieu, was continued during 
the year. 

October. Discovery of America. Indiana. Culture of bulbs. Hallowe'en. 

November. Bryant. Alcott. Tbanhsglving Day. Niagara Falls. 

December. Whlttler. Germany. Cbrlstmaa. Murlllo and. his pictures, 

January. Franklin and printing. Burns. Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. 

February. Lincoln. Washington. Mt. Vernon. Great Britain and Ireland. 

March. Our common trees. Evolution of the book. Italy. 

April. Irving. Alice Gary, Shakespeare. Grant. Easter. 

May. Emerson. Birds. 

June. Flag Day. 

July. Statesmen. Hawthorne, Fourth of July. The Land of Pluck. 

August. Holmes. Tennyson, .Scott, Gardens, 

September. Eugene Field, Phoebe Gary. Cooper, 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



report of associate libraries. 39 

Periodicals. 

Id January we began the circulatiou of current numbers of the fol- 
iQwiog magazines: 

Century Maeazloe. 
Harper's Bazar. 
Harper's Magazine. 
Popular Mechanics. 
Review of Reviews. 
Saint NIcbolaB. 
Scribner's Magazine. 
World's Work. 

These were charged for a period of three days each. The very large 
number of patrons who took advantage of this opportunity proves that 
this is an important part of our work. 

Photogbapiis. 

A year ago we began to make a collection of photograpliR of local 
views wbicb now numbers 274. Many of these were contributed by 
friends of tbe library who are interested in making this collection a 
pictorial history of this section of our state. We hope to add to it 
from time to time, particularly photographs showing the development 
of the Copper Country. 

Story Hour in Childbex's Room, 

Tbis department of onr work is still in its infancy, but it has already 
been proved that it is important and meets a distinct need. 

Subject. Children present. 

March 10. The pied piper of Hamtln 7G 

17. King of the Golden River « 

31. a. The little hero of Haarlem 

b. Evolution of the book 26 

April 7. ■ a. The horse that b'leeved 

b. The boy that was scaret of dyin' 

c. The last lesson 32 

1*. The lesson of faith 28 

July 16. a. Sketch of Hawthorne 

b. The miraculous pitcher 15 

23. a. Mary Mapcs Dodge 

b. The Land of Pluck 20 

Sept. 19. Eugene Field and hie poems 34 

Since Sept. 10 we have made the story hour a regular feature, holding 
it at 10:30 a. m. every Saturday. The alteudanoe has been very much 
larger than previously. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



CHARLOTTE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Mrs. Geo. Sherwood, Librarian. 

The interest in our public library is increaBing. More boobs have been 
drawn for our Bhelves than ever before, and the greater per cent of them 
are from the best authors. Several hundred new books have been added 
along various lines. The library is well equipped with magazines and 
periodicals of a high order. Since November 11th, the library has been 
opened on each Sunday afternoon for two hours. This opportunity for 
using the reading room is well improved. 

DKTROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

H. M. UtLEY, LIBR.4RUN. 

The first building erected for branch library purposes was opened about 
July 1. It is 72x35 feet in size, one story high. There is a high basement 
in which there is a lecture room seated for 250 persons. The library 
occupies the main floor, one side for adults the other for children. The 
windows are placed high and the book shelves are along the walls. The 
building is heated by steam and lighted hv Kernst lamps. The cost of 
the building and furnishing was about fl2.000. 

A lot for another branch library was donated by the late James E. 
Scripps. The city is expected to make an appropriation of $15,000 to 
erect a building on this lot, to be ready for use in 1!)07. 

The commission has lieen notified by Mr. Carnegie that his offer of 
$750,000 for library building purposes made in IMl is still open. There 
are some indications that the common council will see its way clear to 
accept this offer at an early day. The city government in making its 
appropriations for IflOO treated the library mnch more liberally than ever 
before. The total appi-opriation was increased from about $50,000 to 
very nearly $75,000, which enabled the commission to pay more suitable 
salaries to its employes as well as to buy more books and to increase its 
activities in other directions. 

Early in 1906 the library started a plan of making some of the large 
and well organized manufactories library deposit stations for the benefit 
of employes. This has I)een tried in six, having 500 to 1,200 employes 
each and has proved highly successful. Some 300 to 500 books are sent 
to each and held in some snitable room for free circulation among such 
of the emplojes as choose to supply themselves with regular library 
cards. These books seem to be highly appi-eciated and have a large 
circulation. 

Upon a similar plan a collection of about 200 books has been put into 
the East Side Settlement House. This is a building erected especially for 
the purpose of an organisation made u|) mainly of King's Daughters and 
Young Peoples' Clubs. It is lof'ated in a densely pojmlafed section'tjf 
the city, occupied largely by families of foreign birth, and the work 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 41 

of the Settlement is designed to improve tlie social and intellectual side 
of their lives. Kiudei^arten, manual traiuing, domestic science are 
taught, and a free reading room helps to make the place attractive. 

A station similar in some i-espects has l)een started at Iteesville in the 
extreme eastern part of the city, some five miles from the Library. Hwe 
a club has been organized of the young people of the neighborhood and 
the rector of the church has consented to act as librarian and take 
charge of applications for and delivery of books. These are sent ont 
from the library tno or three times a week by special messenger. 

Early in tlie year Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Stevens placed in the children's 
department six special libraries to be sent to the homes of the sick or 
crippled children who are not physically able to go out. Each of these 
libraries is made up of twenty books pnt up in a neat oak case with 
shelves. The case has a handle so that it can be carried and set np in 
the child's room as a book case. The hooks were very carefully selected 
and have been found very attractive to the children. The cases are al- 
ways out and there is demand for more. The gift was made in memory 
of an only son of Mr. and Mrs. Stevens who died in childhood. 

By the annexation of new territory and the growth of the city eight 
new and large schoolhouses were opened on the 1st of Septemller. A 
thousand books were bought to supply these schools, making the total 
supply of library books specially supplied for public school use, about 
14,000. These are distributed to all the grades above the second. 

A story hour on alternate Saturday afternoons in the childi-en's depart- 
ment and a talk to the children on the intervening Saturdays upon 
some topic calculated to increase their interest in books and reading have 
always attracted a room full of children. This system is now in vogue 
in the branch library which has a lecture room. It is planned to procure 
a stereopticon and give illustrated lectures to adults. The purpose is to 
make the Library the center of literary influence and to bring the people 
into intimate aci^uaintance with it. 



FLINT PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Lena E, Caldwell. LiniuniAN, 

This has been the first year in our new Library, and we have spent 
a great deal of time arranging the Inioks, making a shelf list and card 
catalog. 

We have bad a large circulation of books and good attendance in the 
reading room. The children's room is very popular. 

We are at preseut engaged in arranging the government documents 
in a room that has just been finished. A lecture room is also being 
finished; as soon as possible we expect to have a story hour and lec- 
tures. In fact, our report for next year may be of some interest. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



GBAND HAVEN PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
ISABELL M. Thomson, Librarian. 

Our Library is opeu thi-ee afternoons each week, and we have a weekly 
circulation of lietween 250 and 300. 

The board has recently added fSOO worth of new books, which wilt 
inerease its circulation. 

We have no branch library, 

GRAND RAPIDS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Samuel H, Raxck, Librarian. 

Bomb of the Things Started Dlring the Yeah by the Grand Rapids 

Public Librarv, as REroBTEn by Miss Annie A. Pollard, Second.". 

Assistant Librarian, at the Battle Creek Meeting op 

THE Michigan Library Associ.^tiox, May 31-JrsE 1, 

1906, With a few Things Started Since 

That Time. 

Four-Tenths Mill Tax. 

Perhaps the most important change in the administration of the Grand 
Rapids Public Library is the change in the method by which we receive 
our income for expenses. According to a provision of the new charter 
for the City of Grand Rapids the Library is to receive 4-10 of a milt 
tax on the assessed valuation of the city's property instead of (aa be- 
fore) an amount appropriated by the common council annually. The 
advantage of a stable income over one tliat fluctuates with the common 
council's variable intei-cst may i-eadily be seen. Another advantage 
is that the income of the Library increases regularly with the growth 
of the city. 

Municipal Documents. 

The Grand Rapids Public Library has been made the depository of all 
the municipal documents not in use in the various city offices of Grand 
Rapids and also the medium for exchanging the documents of this city 
with other institutions and cities. It is hoped that within a few years 
we shall build up a collection which will be, not only of interest to onr 
readers, but also of great value to the city at large. 

The Winnie Whitfield Blti.er Collection of Picture Books for 

Children. 

Our collection of colored picture books is one of the most popular fea- 
tures of onr Cliildren's Room. This collection was established and en- 
dowed by Mr. B, D. Butler in memory of his wife. These books are 
selected with the gi-eatest care, many of them being linen and rag books. 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 



TllA\'ELING LiBRARV BOXES. 

We have also this year established a B.vsteni of traveling libraries 
whereby books may be taken to schools, Sunday schools, fire engine 
houses, and other iusti tut ions. These collections are sent in boxes which 
we have specially made for the purpose. As many as 2,000 books have 
been ont in these boxes at one time. 

Medical Reading Room. 

In September. 1905, a Medical Reading Room was opened. This room 
was made possible by the action of a committee of physicians KUifai'* 
teeing to the Library for a |)eriod of five years the sum of f50 |)er year, 
this same to go for subscriptions toward medical periodicals. There 
are now in this room 37 periodicals relating to medicine, nursing, etc 

BissELL House Branch Libbarv. 

In September, 1905, a branch library was opened at Bissell House (a 
house operated upon settlement house plans). The Bissell House Asflo- 
ciation furnishes a room, heating, light, etc., and the Library, the books 
and attendant. This branch is ojien from 1 to 9 p. m. every week day. 

Branch Libraries in School Buildings. 

An agreement has been entered into this year with the board of educa- 
tion whereby permanent branch libraries may be established in the 
public schools. The school board will provide and equip a room together 
with heat, light and janitor services — all without expense to tlie Library, 
The Library will supply a librarian, the books and periodicals, and may 
conduct, where the arrangement of the building will permit, courses of 
popular lectures. Most of the public school buildings of the city are not 
planned with such a room in view, but as new ones are erected, or when 
additions to old buildings are made, it is expected to equip them with li- 
brary rooms. The new Sigsbee school building which opened in Septem- 
ber contains such a room. Similar rooms have been ordered for the ad- 
ditions to the Palmer Avenue school and the Buchanan Street school, 
which are to be ready by September, 1907, and plans are being considered 
for another one at Hall Street school. 

CoNTiNLOL's Editation .\fter Le.wing Sciiool. 

At the time the agreement to establish school branch libraries was 
adopted the school board also authorized the superintendent of schools 
to instruct the school principals to i-eixirt to the Library twice a year 
the names and addresses of all children who have left school peruui- 
nently, so that the Library may follow Iheui up in an effort to endeavor 
to interest them in continuing their education through the Library. 
The first reports from the school principals have been sent in from the 
Re\-eral schools, and these children are being followed up by the Librarj'. 
It is too earlv as vet to determine the probable results, of this .e^jreri- 

ment. " " Dgnz..! ;yV^.OOglL 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



CouBSE OF Home Sbading. 

The Library has also perfected plans to assist people to pursue a con- 
tinued course of reading on any subject. Blanks bave been printed and 
from these, when filled out, we get some idea of tbe education and 
point of view of the person who desires snt-h a conrse. 

HlST(MtIC.\L SOCIETI' OF GR.*.\D RaPIDS. 

r.ia8t August, 1005, the Historical Society of Grand Rapids voted to 
transfer its funds (about $1.600| and its books to our Board of Library 
Commissioners as trustees. This society is given a meeting place in the 
Library and purposes to work with the Library in building up its His- 
torical Department, and in fostering an interest in history. The income 
of the fund referred to above will be devoted exclusively to tbe purchase 
of mateiiiil relating to Michigan. 

AUMIXISTRATION — LiBR.*RIAN's OfFICE. 

On account of the increjise in the administrative work of the Library 
and the present wholly inadequate quarters for this work, it has been 
decided to move our catalogue room down stairs and to use the space 
thus made for additional office room. The cost of installing the requisite 
furnitui-e and fittings for these enlarged facilities for work (new office 
and catalogue room) will be from JSOfl to |1,000. 

HiSTORic.xr. Boom. 

The splendid equipment of this room was installed in June, 1905. A 
large part of our Michigan material was then moved into it, though 
we already have more material than the present shelves will accom- 
modate. No attempt was made to keep this room open regularly until 
January, lilOO, when we began a series of exhibitions, which it is 
]ilanned to continue throughout the yesir. In January tbe collection 
of works on funiitufe, etc., just imi>orted fi"oni Berlin was here ex- 
hibited for the month. Besides the books on the tables alt the wait 
space was utilized for the display of plates, the room having been 
equipped with brass rods suspended on wires for this purpose. Since 
then a new exhibit has l>een installed each month. The attendance at 
these exhibits varies from 1,500 to over 4,000 each month. With some 
of the exhibits a series of informal talks have l>een given by some of 
our citizens. 

T[:bekci"ix>sis Exhibit. 

In the latter part of May and the first week in June, 1006, there was 
shown in the Ryei-son Public Library building the exhibit of the Na- 
tional Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. In 
connection with this exhibit there were given informal talks every after- 
noon at 4 o'clock and also to childi-en of a number of public and pa- 
rochial schools who came to the Library in a body at various hours of 
the day. ICach evening during the exhibit there was an illustrated 
lecfui-e on some phase of tul>erculosis by lectures from outside of tbe 
city. This exhibit was brought to the city by the (irand Rapids Anti- 



REPORT OP ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 45 

Tuberculosis Society aad was attended by mofe tlian 12,000 persona dur- 
ing the ten days it watt shown. 

Exhibit of Collier Collbction, 

During two weeks in Septenil>er the exhibit of nonie 300 original 
drawings and paintings by distinguished American illustrators, known 
aa the Collier colW-tion, was shown in the Ryerson Public Library 
building. This exhibit attracted a great deal of attention, and in spite 
of the fact that it was here during the hottest weather the city had ex- 
perienced for many years, the total attendance was inore than 18,000 and 
the attendance of the last day was double that of the first day. In 
addition, talks were given in the lecture room every afternoon at 4 
o'clock and on three evening of each week. It may be remarked that 
this exhibit is usually shown only in the leading art galleries of the 
largest cities. 

Tb-wel Guides. 

Last summer (in 190D) we placed on one of the tables in the regis- 
tration room a large collection of travel guides, the printed matter 
used by transportation companies, vacation resorts, etc. These things 
we can easily get for the asking and it was surprising to see the num- 
ber of people who use<l them. The jiurpose of these guides. t«^ther 
with certain books in the Libi-ary, which were also placed in this 
room, ia that persons may come to the Library to plan their vacation. 
The guides ai-e classified and placed in little baskets conveniently 
labeled. The things in them have l>een renewed from time to time 
so as to keep jtace witti the season. 

No record is kept of the use made of them. 

Pn I STING. 

In advertising our lectures a new and successful feature has been the 
printed jdacard for store and office windows and the various rooms of 
the building, and little slips containing lists of books on the subject of 
the lecture which were placed in every book issued a week before the 
lecture. 

GenM-tx FtRNiTLBB Books. 

Our collection of works on furniture has been materially strengthened 
by miscellaneous purchases of French. English, and American worka, 
but especially by a splendid collection on furnitui-e designing, and in- 
dustrial arts from Kerlin — 80 volumes. These books must be seen to 
be really appreciated. Some idea of their value may be inferred from the 
fact that the average price jicr volume of this collection was about |10. 

The Sji.vllpox EeiuEMic. 

Some years ago a smallpox epidemic closed the Library's doors for 
several weeks. When the epidemic again revived in the siiring and 
summer of 1905, the Library decide^l to make an effort to keep open and 
yet make the circulation of books safe. . 

In connection with the Board of Health we fumigated a)) th^siVublic 



46 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

roome; opening and thoroiiglily furoigatiog all the bookB contained in 
them. This was done after closing hourn. Also dnring the time tlie 
epidemic tasted, all books, as they were returned, were taken to a per- 
fectly air-tight room where a formaldehyde generator was lighted every 
morning and evening. The books all had to be oarefnily opened, otber- 
wise the fumes did not permeate to the very back. This took much time 
and expense, bnt we felt it was insigniilcant as compared, with the clos- 
ing of the Library. Our street index was also a help in locating cases. 

SciIOOr. AND COI.LF.OK CATALOGUES. 

A table in the reference room has been set aside for school and col- 
lege catalogues. In this collection about 2(10 institutions are represented 
and othei'S are tieing mlded constantly. The catalogues are classified 
according to the character of the institution and there is a card index of 
names. The purpose of tbis collection is 1o enable those who are 
specially interested to learn without difficulty something about the var- 
ious schools and colleges of the country, in the event of their going or 
sending someone away from borne for additional education. The col- 
lection has been very much used, especially during August and Septem- 
ber. Four [lersons at one time have been noticed studying these cat- 
alogues. 

Work for the Blind. 

All the blind people in the city of whom we have had knowledge were 
visited by onr superintendent of circulation last year. In this way we 
found out how many could read and what kind of embossed print they 
could read. After this a conference of the blind people was held at the 
Library and as a result a weekly series' of readings for the blind was 
started. Since this arrangement was made, hooks are being sent for by 
this Library from outside of the city to be delivered and called for by 
the Library at the homes of the blind readers in Grand Rapids without 
any expense to them. It is believed that for the present the blind can 
better be served in this way than the Library to purchase books, inas- 
much as the number of readers is relatively small. 

Books ox American P.^inteks. 

In October. IflOfi. there was formally turned over to the Library the 
fund of 110(10 from the estate of the late Charles Wooleey Coit, at which 
time the Board of Library Commissioners voted to name it the Charles 
Woolsey Cbit Fund. The income of this fund is to be used only in the 
purchase of books relating to Americanpainters. It is the hope of the 
Library that ultimately there will be a considerable number of such 
funds for sjwcific purjKtses. 

Lectures. 

During the past year the Library has ofi'ered a very large number of 
lectures which ai-e given in the Kyerson Public Library building. Bis-, 
sell House Branch Library, beginning with Januarj, 1907, at the 
Sigsbee School Branch. Most of these lectures attract more people 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 47 

than our lecture room, is able to acoommodate, sometimes the number 
who wish to hear them being twice as many as the lecture room is able 
to seat. 

HARTFORD LADIKS' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

Pauline T. Hf.ald, Secretary. 

We now have ISOO volumes on our shelves — a gaiu of 200 during the 
.vear. Last spring, we tried to secure a vote from the township to ac- 
cept and support a Carnegie Library, asking for |5,875, to require i^- 
mill tax mounting to fSSf annually. We proposed to turn over our 
books to the township Library for this purpose. The proposition waa 
defeated by a small majority, but we hope, in the near future, to 
succeed. 

HUDSON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

5I.\MIE E, IlAVfiNS, LiBHARIAN. 

During 1!)00, tlie interest in the Library liei-c has been on the increase. 
This fall, we began the story hour, and it seems to be much enjoyed. We 
have had not quite two years of experience so feel we arc only beginning; 
but, from the start, a good many children have patronized the Library. 

I cannot report anything especially new. 

The number of books i»isued during lOOC. not including this week's 
record, has been 20,900 ; 2,380 borrowers have been registered since Feb- 
ruary 10, 1005. 

IRON MOUNTAIN, CARNEGIE LIBRARY. 
Margaret McVety, Librarian. 

During 1006 a series of special days for children was begun. Fourth, 
fifth and sixth grades were invited by rooms to the library on Saturday 
for a story hour and a vei-y simple talk on books. 

To add somewhat to the limited pleasure of the children and afford 
occasion for the talks a number of magic lantern afternoons were given, 
the slides chosen being such as to supplement the elementary Greek and 
Roman history covered by the school course. The simpler books of 
classic myths were in demand for some time afterward. 

Recently a contest was held. The picture sides of the paper covers 
from the new children's books wci-e trimmed out, the name covered; these 
were mounted in groups on cardboard and numbered. The children 
discovered from the books in their rooms, or guessed, the proper name 
and from the catalogue wrote the book number. A large number of the 
•yonnger children entered and were keenly interested. 

Invitations were extended to teachers to bring classes for any special 
occasion; this has been accepted by several. 

Teachers' privileges have been extended both as to the number of 
books for school use and the length of time. , , 

^ L.,.-,z.i..;>L.OOglC 



48 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Collections have been loaned to aoliools to be re-loaned at the discre- 
tion of the teacher. 

The list of magazines for adults was increased in the fait and extra 
copies of the best popular ones are now circulated with a three day 
limit. 

Restrictions on the bound volumes have been largely removed, and all 
restrictions on no n- fiction. 

The collection of works on engineering has been materially increased. 

Statistics additions— 1108; volumes— yiOO ; circulation— 32,000. 



JACKSON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Celia F. \V.vldo, Librabian. 

We have been "behind the scenes" a good share of this year, and there- 
fore there has not been as much doing as i)erhaps might have been true 
under ordinary conditions and circumstances. On August 20th, we 
opened the new Carnegie Lil»rary formally to the public — or, rather, 
perhaps, 1 should say, informally. At any rate the building was given 
over for two days to the public to inspect from cellar to garret— "up- 
stairs, down stairs and in the lady's" office they wandered, and on 
August 22ud the regular work of the library began. It is pleasant to 
be in a clean, new, and quiet place, and the people seem to appreciate 
the change. The reading room is especially attractive, and even the 
classic front of the building suggests that there is room enough for 
all who care to come, and as you enter, this impression is confirmed. 

Three more schools ha\-e knocked for admission to the branch system, 
which supplies them directly with books for school use, subject to the 
call of the Library once a year. only. We have now eight such schools 
using this privilege actively, and each year we spend for them alt the 
fine monies that accrue from the state. 

The whole number of books in the library April 30, 1906, was 29,724 
volumes. 

Added bv purchase during the vear 687 

Added \iy gift 187 

Added by Public documents , . , , 305 

1179 
Withdrawn and worn out, lost, and 

unaccounted for 646 

Whole number belonging at date— April 30, 1906 30,257 

JONESVILLE LADIES' LIBRARY. 
Mary D. Graham, Librabian. 

299 tickets sold during year (by purchase). 5,482 books drawn, 
134 volumes added, having now 3,739 in library; 51 public documents, 
17 Geology Atlases, 13 Geo. Bulletins received. 
We feel very much encoui-.iged in our work and proud of our Jones- 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 49 

ville Ladies' Librarv, and we hojw tliut sometime in the future we may 
be able to start a reading room for tbe young people. 



LAKSIXG PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

GERTRI'DE p. HtMniREY, LlBR.VatAS. 

The Library containR, according to a careful estimate. 15,399 bound 
volumes, has on file 115 current periodicals, and baa been used by 6813 
card holders and 49,294 readers during the last year. 

Special Lines of Progress. 

Perhaps the most important features of tbe work of tbe past year 
have been the Sunday afternoon opening and the extended evening 
hours since January 1st; the development of tbe children's story hour; 
the establishment in April of tbe rental collection of books; several 
changes in the circulation rules; and the opening of a second branch 
library through the efforts of the City Federation of Women's Clubs. 

I<es8 generally known, but of value to the Library and its future, have 
been the steady increase in new borrowers (1154), the apprentices' ejt- 
aminntions held for the first time and the lectures on reference work 
given to the students of the High School, 

Growth. 

Of the 2012 vohinies added to the Library, 13C0 have been purchased 
from the regular book fund and 379 from the supplementary reading 
or contingent fund, the latter for the exclusive use of students during 
the school year. Kighty-one books have l>een added by binding and 292 
by gift. 

Gifts. 

The total number of gifts, so far I'ecordcd, has been 1.031, 
representing 77 givers. We have licew especially grateful for a few 
works by Lansing authors, to add to the already small beginnings of 
an autograph collection which we boi)e will increase in size and interest 
as time goes on. One of the most practical of tbe gifts of the past year 
has been the maintenance of the Cedar Street Branch Library by the 
Lansing Federation of Women's Clubs. 

Bookbinding Exhibit. 

The Library was fortunate in securing, through the courtesy of Mr, 
John Cotton Dana, for exhibit from tbe 2:!nd to the 27th of June, the 
binding exhibit of the Newark Public Library, This exhibit consists 
of about 350 specimens of processes, styles and failures in binding: 
binders' material, etc, which were studied with much interest and 
profit by local binders, hook-lovers, and others. Two evenings were 
given up to informal talks and explanations by some of our leading 
binders. 



i.vL.ooglc 



50 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

T'SE. 

The niimlter of new borrowerK luis l)wn 1.154. a n*t ini-reasp of 1,123. 

No effort has bet'n made to attract flie public except hy meanB of fre- 
quent Iwok lists in the local papers «nd during the late spring the 
placing of Bigns. giving location, bourn of the Library with "Free to 
all." in several of the railway stations, factories, and in the postoffice. 
DiiubtlesR the results of this will be largely felt during tb© coming 
year. 

Kkfeub\i:b 1>E. 

The extra hour at night since January Ist. and the Kunday afternoon 
opening of three hours have attracted numbers of readers, many of 
tbcui along technical lines. The total recorded number of 49,2^ is 
probably much below the actual facts, owing to the arrangement of 
the reading rooms and the work at the desk precluding an adequate 
count. 

Encouraging facts in the work have l)een tlie steadily growing imtpon- 
nge of the Library by all classes (noticeably artisans and business 
men), and the apparent appreciation of the e<-ononiically and meagerly 
run, branches and the work with the childivn. 

Since spring none of the class books have been borrowed until after 
tbey have been on the book display rack a week for the examination of 
all. In this way many more of them have been looked through here 
than previously. 

Storv Holb. 

One of the most enjoyable features of the year has been this work, 
largely contributed by I.jinsing friends, nearly all of them being trained 
and experienced kindergarteners. 

We have been especially fortunate in numbering among our story 
tellers Miss Wheeler. Principal of the (irand Kapids Kindergarten 
Training School; Miss Moore, of Council Bluffs, Iowa, and many other 
graduates from proniinent kindergarten schools. 

The Christmas story hour, told hy Mrs. E. M. Lake, with the ac- 
companying carols and a Christmas ti'ee — a total surprise for the chil- 
dren — was a most enjoyable occasion for grownups as well as little 

Children's Work. 

We have found that as a rule little advertising of the story hour has 
l>een adi'isable, lest we would be overrun by eager girlg and boys and 
babies waiting for 4 o'clock, each one asking. ''Please may / lead the 
line," as the stories have usually l)een told to an audience seated on the 
Hoor of the second story auditorium. 

A May-pole dance, given on Saturday afternoon, May 5th, was quite 
a delight to many children from the outlying schools, who had never 
seen a May-pole. 

The second annual flower show of the children of the public, parochial 
and German schools, was held cm Saturday afternoon and evening, 
September Ifitb, in the children's room. In the spring seeds had been 
distributed from the Library through the schools at a nominal cost. 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 51 

The pri7^» offered were books, given first for three grades of bouquets 
nnd second for the best garden in each school. 

Special I'bks of the Building. — Drawino Exhibit. 

On December 27th. 28th and 20th an exhibition of drawing work was 
held in the auditorium of the Library as an adjunct to the annual meet- 
ing of the State Teachers' Association. 

I'SG OK THE ItUIl.DlXli BY Cl.UUS. 

During tlie year five of the Women's clubs of the city have held, with 
a few ex<-eptions, tbeir regular meetings, both weekly and fortnightly, 
as well a« some receptions, farces, city Federation meetings and lec- 
tures, in the chili rooms and anditoi-iuin on the second floor. 

Bra X CUES. 

The Logan Street brancli has been carried on during the year with 
the reading and delivery room open on Tuesday nnd Friday evenings 
from 7 to i> j). m.. with a few exceptions. 



September 182 92 S 

October 6 257 136 9 

November 4 234 ISO 8 

December 169 113 8 

J&Duary 7 230 142 9 

I-'ebruary G 180 119 8 

March 7 217 137 9 

April fi 215 127 8 

May 5 167 119 9 

.Tune 6 173 136 9 

July 4 149 150 9 

August 9 127 121 g 

Total 60 2,290 1,512 103 

Cedar Street Braxcii, 

.V branch delivery and reading room was opened on tlie night of May 
INth, in the Eighth grade rmnn of the Cedar Street School. The club 
women of the City Federation were directly responsible for this start 
and they agreed to pay the running expenses until fall, to demonstrate 
to the Board of Education the need and advisability of this work. The 
number of readerf has In-en 284 and the number of books loaned 315 
thus far. The room has been ojien 14 evenings. 

Apprentices' Exa minatioxs. 

In May and June examinations were given to three apprentice eandi- 
dates, two of whom have been admitted to the Library. Two other ap- 
plicants for apprenticeship sjient a few days each in the Library, one 
of whom will l>e admitted this fall. 



62 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Although this training requires a considerable expenditure of time 
and energy and is consequently an expense to the Library, still it is 
an investment which pays good dividends. One point which cannot 
be too strongly insisted upon, is that certain standards must be main- 
tained in the selection of the candidates and they must stand strictly 
on their own merits. The requirements during the past year have been 
a satisfactory entrance examination followed by six months of service 
without pay. 

ClRCLLATlOX, 

The circulating department has been improved^ — first by the change 
of its closing hours tu 8:30 p. m. tthis experiment has thus far been 
quite satisfactory, allowing time for a considerable start on the morn- 
ing's work), and the readers have seemed content to borrow all books 
at that time. 

On the first of April a change was made in the introduction of the 
date when the books are due, this date being used on the book pocket, 
book, cards, etc., instead of the date of issue. The rule of but one 
book of fiction on a card was rigidly enforced in the spring and re- 
placed the two volumes which had been allowed by request, if one of 
these was an old or standard novel. 

The juvenile borrowers have been given for the first time a distinct 
card, cherry l>cing the color chosen— looking toward the time when 
their books will l>e issued from the juvenile room. All children below 
seven years of age are now required to bring word from tbeir parents, 
stating that they wish them to take library books and will be re- 
sponsible for the use of this privilege. 

Rrferknce WonK. 

The reference use of the Library has been steadily growing so that 
the work requires much more of the staff's time than formerly. 

A few of the clubs have co-oi>crated more than ever before in the ar- 
rangement of their programs in consultation and in accordance with our 
resources. The handling of the large number of Central School and other 
pupils — nearly all wanting help at the same moment — lias taken a great 
deal of time and energy. However, a series of lectures on the primary 
reference books, catalogs and decimal classifications, with various prac- 
tical problems, was given during the winter and spring by the Librarian, 
to all of the High School students, taking the classes a section at a time. 
More personal work has also been done with pupils and others. Beneficial 
results of this instruction were very soon noticeable and we expect 
them to continue. 

Grade Libilvries. 

Dxtra work has been done on the grade traveling libraries which need 
to be completely reorganized. Many new volumes are needed. The cir- 
culation has fallen off quite largely becanae the children have read and 
re-read most of them. Raring the summer many have been rebound and 
others repaired at the Library and some withdrawn. Those readyMfor 
circulation are, now in good shape, O 



report of associate libraries. 53 

Extra Work. 

The extra occasions — lectures, etc. — for tlie general public were 
largelj given up and centered in the children's story hour. Holidays 
and important birthdays were commemorated on the bulletin boards 
and Christmaa and patriotic days were observed with appropriate dec- 
orations of greens and tiags. 

The renewal of books and other information furnished by telephone, 
together with many hundreds of special library and book permits dated 
etc., for the High School pupils, has consumed a large amount of time. 

liirOKT-iXT PCRCIIASES AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

A typewriter has been bought; a Bell telephone added; a limited 
supply of sci-eens obtained; a badly needed cement floor laid in the 
janitor'8 room; simple lights have been placed at the sides of the main 
entrance; porch boxes have made the steps more attractive during the 
summer, and a cement walk for the High School bordering the Litirary 
lawn, has made a vast improvement. The grounds will be greatly bet- 
tered when the long-deferred and much bopedfor grading of the east 
portion has been linished. 

Finances. 

During the past year the average amount expended per Iwrrower has 
been 07 cents and per citizen liiV^ cents, apportioned on the basis of 
20,000 pojnilation given by the City Directory for 7 

STATISTICS. 



p 1906. 



Total number of volumes In library 15,399 

Total Dumber of volumeB In circulation 39.716 

Total number readers 49,294 

Total number of card-holders 6,843 

Total number of new card-holders 1,154 

Total numbe- perio<ilcals (current) 116 

Total receipts 16.500 51 

Total expenses (4,578 95 



Number of volumes In library at beginning of year 14.365 

Number of volumes added by purchase 1,739 

Number of volumes added by gift 292 

Number of volumes added by binding 81 

'I'otal added 2,012 

Total In library 15,399 



NumLer of books rebound 364 

Numher or hooka rebound and repaired 507 

Number of magazines bound 68 

Number of newspapers bound (■■■rii~inL; ^' 

Average cost per volume of blndins l)ooks :;.S-.'.C^y |i(| 31 

Average cost per volume ot hindin!: magazines 71 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



MAKISTEH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Kl-IZA E. TOWNSRXD. LinRARiAN". 

The year has been an eventful one in every way, the or}tanization of 
thp library having been completed, its policy f<»rnied and many lines of 
activity opened. 

The adult and juvenile »helf listH and catalogs have l>een flniobed and 
kept up to date. For tliive months during llie winter Miss Florence 
Hays, of Osbkosh, Wisconein, was employed as cataloger for the old 
school library l>ooks, and rendered most eiHeient service. 

The library ia in good working order with 7,-159 volumes on the shelves, 
an increase of 2,71i> over last year, a comparatively large increase made 
possible by many generous gifts. 

The total circulation for the fiscal year was 54.711, which includes 
also the circulation at the two school libraries. The fiction per cent 
of circulation for adult and juvenile books was .fio. a decrease irom 
the last report of three per cent. 

At the end of the last fiscal year there were 1.782 borrowers. This 
has increased to 3,3!)3, which, however, does not include the cards since 
cancelled, used hy a number of reaorters and transients during the 
summer season. The total represents about one-fifth of Manistee's popu- 
lation. The number of readers could be more than doubled if the li- 
brary's resources would permit of distributing stations in the outlying 
parts of the city. 

The attendance in the reading room has continued very large. It was 
found necessary, during the winter months, to purchase more chairs for 
the Children's Room. The total number of readers recorded for all 
rooms, a record necessarily inaccurate, is 42.H;i8 for the ,vear. 

Reference work is one of Ihe most imiwrtant parts of a library's ad- 
ministration. A new encycloi)edia. atlas, other smaller works, also the 
newly bound magazines, have added greatly to the efficiency of a service 
now rapidl.v increasing. No separate i-ecord is kept of this room; but 
such a record will soon be of use and of great interest. 

Work in the Children's Room shows much growth and the space is 
often taxed to its utmost capacity. There are now 2.26!) juvenile books 
which circulated during the year 28.443 times, an average of over 12 
readings for every book. 

The two weekly story hours have l>een largely attended. I.^st winter 
Mrs. AV. J. (iregoi'v had chai-ge of the Saturday' afternoon story hour 
for the older children. It is now in charge of Miss Mary Loudon. The 
Friday afternoon story for the very little children is told by Miss Har- 
riet Ajer. an assistant in the library. During the winter a Boys' Clnb 
and a Oirls' Club were organized, Mrs. F. W, M'hite conducted the 
Boys' flub, assisted by Mr. Chelsea Foy and Mr. Harold Tibbitts. This 
year it is led l>y Sliss Marinetfe Ramtdell with the same assistants. The 
Oirls' ('lull is under the direct c<introl of the lihracian. assisted by 
Miss Jane I'clric. Regular courses of story telling and reading are 
followed in these story hours and cinhs. and the results have fuH,v 
justified all the effort. 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 55 

Of the three Ward Rchool libraries piit under the dii-eetion of the 
Library Board, it wa« decided to ooiitiinie two as cimilatinR libraries 
at the schools, these schools beiiic quite a dmtauce from the library 
building. 

Co-operation with the teachers has been encouraged in every way pos- 
sible. Eighty-eight teachers' cards are now in Benice. many taking 
class room libraries in this \i'ay. Drawing exhibits from the schools 
have been on exhibition in the fhildren's Room during the school year. 
A few pictures, about two hundred, have been prepared for circulation 
among the teachers. 

The High School has come to tiie library in regular classes this fall 
for practical lectures on the use of tlie catalog and reference books. 
Instruction is also given when possible to groups of children. 

WoKK With Cllbs. 

This has not as yet grown very extensive; but books for special Btudy 
work have been bought when ueeded and willing assistance given iu the 
reference room. 

Three traveling libraries have been prepared and sent out; one to the 
Mercy Hospital, one to the Fire station and the third to the "("hristian 
Home," an institution carried on for tlie amusement and benefit of hoys. 

The library owns books in four foi-eign languages. Polish. Swedish, 
German and Norwegian. These special libraries are very small and 
need many more books to be of much value. 

Many books and magazines have been given to the library this year. 
With the proceeds of a loan picture exhibition the I>akeside Club pre- 
sented the library with four l)eautiful framed reproductions of famous 
paintings, which were gladly received. This fall the Civics Department 
of the same chib gave the book fuud f 17<'^.-(), gained from a flower festi- 
val. The W. C, T. U. also kindly donated a portrait of Fi-ances Willard 
to hang in the auditorium. The local newspaiiers have given weekly space 
for Library Notes, which have been a gi-cat aid in advertising. A gen- 
eral list of donors will be found at the end of the statistical report. 



MENDON TOWNSHIP FREK PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Gr.\ce Osgood, Lmn.MtiAX. 

We opened our new Carnegie I^ibi-ary on May 'it!, lifOIJ, with almut 
5,000 volumes. 1.000 l>eing for reference work. Have just ordered about 
150 new books. We will soon establish the Children's Hour. Our 
]>atr<ms nundW about Si*'). 

MONROE CITY LIBRARY. 

JkNXIK S. W.\l.l-All^. LlllR.\IIIAN. 

While our library has n<)f e-jfablished any biaucli libraries, it is in 
better condition as a library than at this time lust year, as far as general 
order is concei'ned. 



S6 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

We liave put in a new International Encyclopedia and carry a nice 
line of magazines. Last month 1,049 used the reading room. The pro- 
portion of children who use the library in small. 



MT. CLEMENS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
GitACB L. Farrau, .Assistant Librarian. 

Oiira is a school library in a Carnegie biiildinfc without any branches. 
This is our second year in this building and while we hare been very 
active, the activities are not of such a nature a« to make much of a 
ehowing. Our work for the children has probably been more general 
than in other departments, ^\'e have added two stacks to their room and 
about '500 books. In the main reading room of the library we have 
added to the reading matter of this year a large number of magazines, 
)>eriodicals and metropolitan daily pai)ers. We have also added a aub- 
Rcription department wherein are kept duplicates of popular works of 
fiction, which circulate principally among transients at a nominal fee. 

These adjuncts, while slight in themselves, have increased greatly the 
usefulness of the library both to our own people and the many visitore to 
our city. 

We have already added since the first of July about 500 new books 
to the open stacks and have several hundred more under contemplation. 

MT. PLEASANT CENTRAL NORMAL LIBRARY. 

SI. L. CoxvEBSE. Librarian. 

A small collection of books has been placed in each of the eight grades 
of the training school and a collection of picture books in the kinder- 
garten. We hope soon to have a children's library at the training 
school, when these honks will be placed together. 

Many valuable sets of periodicals have been added during the year, 
thus strengthening the i-efereiice department. 

A cork carpet on tlie floor of the reading room conduces to quiet 
study. 

XILES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Onii.r- P. Cooi.iDGE, Lidrakian'. 

Report of the Xiles ruhlir Library, December. 19 03 -Decern her. 1906. 

The Niles Public Library has been open every day for circulation ex- 
cept Sundays and legal holidays; the reading room has been open every 
day except Christmas and Thanksgiving Days. The total circulation 
for the year has been 19.f!91 hooks, averaging 00 books per day. The 
number of new borrowers during the year is 547, making the total regis- 
tration since the library first was o]>ened in November, 1904, 2,085. 

Five hundre<1 and seventy-four books have been added during the 
year, this numl)er including gifts and public documents. 

.\n attempt to secure more co-operation l>etween the public schools 
and the library, has met with great success, noticeable by the increase of 



REPORT OP ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 57 

juvenile readers and the better class of books, selected by the young 
people. 

A story hour for the purpose of arousing interest in the library among 
the youngest children has been inaugurated this fall. It is too early to 
judge of the results, but it is hoped that the number of onr young 
readers may be gi-eatly increased and that a taste for the best literature 
may be formed among them. 

We trj' to keep lists of books, either of new bonks or books on special 
subjects in our daily newspapers and on our bulletin board every week. 
We are also trying different means of advertising, having printed no- 
tices of various kinds placed in the public establishments of the city 
and in the various factories. 

The Niles Township Library has recently placed its books on our 
shelves and will in the future contribute annnally for the support of 
our library and in return ai-e to have all the privileges of residents of 
the city. 

OWOSSO L.\DIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 
Frances A. Joxes, Librari.\n". 

We are just managing to keep the library open until the time conies 
to turn it over to the city. Just now, the public demands economy of 
the city fathers. In a few years, I hope, a public library will awaken 
their interest. 

In the juvenile department we have endeavored to turn the boys from 
exclusive reading of blood-curdling talcs of adventure to a more whole- 
some diet of stories of everyday life, of camping, ball-playing and 
school life. We are pleased to note that the boys enjoy the new books. 
In selecting books of permanent value, we are governed by the Women's 
Clubs largely. This year we have added quite a number of valuable 
books on France. 

Owosso does not seem to be a "reading town." The liookseilers and 
Tabard Inn Library complain that thei-e is little interest in books and 
only popular new novels in demand. 



PORT HURON PT'BLIC LIBRARY. 
Alta StANSBiny, LiBR.\niAN. 

The annual report of our circulation will of course not be completed 
until after the end of the month, but will be about 58,000. with be- 
tween 5,000 and 0,000 sulrecribers. We now have over 13,000 books, not 
counting our public and state documents. We have one small branch 
library, only 100 volumes, in South Park, one of our suburbs, and it is 
fairly well patronized. Another one is to be started soon in the north 
end of town, the great length of our town making the two branches 
advisable. 

The use of the library by the clubs and schools lliis winter has been 
remarkably good. Two flourishing clubs iwhicli meet n^ the librar*). 
a University Extension lecture course on English comedy, together with 



53 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

the scliool work, have given us a circulation of the most satisfactory 
kind. And the use thjtt is made of our scientific Iwoks has shown ub 
tliat we can be of genuine help in that line. We have made an effort for 
the last two vears to build up that side of our library, and we shall 
devote special attention to it again this year. 

Over one-third of our cii'culatnm is with the children. We hare a 
weekly story -hour, held Satunlay aftern<H)n8. We have, from 30 to 100 
children each time, one exci>ptional time having 180. The library owns 
a lantern, and after the holidays a series of talks will be given with 
which the lantern is to be used. 

The St. (Mair County Normal Kchool is held in the second floor of 
the library building. The librarian gives a weekly lecture to the school 
on the use of the library, the use of reference books, selection and buying 
of children's Itooks, This work is graded and is counted in with the 
regular work of the school. 

The local pa[)er8 are very good about printing lists of the new books. 
I'cading lists. si>ecial lists of all sorts, all library news items. A list of 
ail meetings {of clubs, etc.* to be held in the library during the week, 
with programs as far as possible, is sent to the papers at the beginning 
of each week. 

Our plans for the winter inchide extending onr work with the schools, 
and bringing our books l>efore the men of the trades and manufacturing 
concerns of the city. Lists of books have already been sent to the 
latter, and will lie followed by other lists later. 

We have a good German librar.v of almost 1,000 volumes, which is 
well used by the Cermans of the city. 

AVe also have a very g<H)d collection of Itraun pictui-es, and they are 
used a great deal by oiir art clubs and students. 

Our work has in it nothing new. but it is very busy work and we feel 
that we ai-e alive and growing. 



SA<J1\AW HOYT LIBRARY. 

HaBRIET A^lES. LlBR.vniAX. 

The Iloyt Library seems to be justifying its existence. 

During the jiast year 2I.ilS5 people have availed themselves of its 
o|H'n door and have used in their researches 55,804 books, drawn from 
every department of study. This is an increase over last year of 1,500 
students and :i.'21i Iwoks. ' " 

The clubs, nine in uunilier. have done esiwcially good work, and .1,700 
s<hool children have l>een assisted in their studies, against ;1.000 last 
year. 

The library purchases are limited to standard books for study and 
each book is cliosen for some actual need. The reading room is sup- 
plied with 125 of the best period icals^Knglish. American, French and 
(iernian, and the entire cidlcction of books and periodicals is free to any 
one who wishes to use them. 



i.vL.ooglc 



REPORT OF ASSOCIATE LIBRARIES. 



tUTrKOIH I'l'BLir LIBRARY. 

AtlUA FaTTERSON. LlBR.VKlAN. 

Our Mbi'iU'.v lias been doing good work in all of ita In-anclies. Tlie cir- 
culation is much larger, we liave more readers and tlie reference t>ookH 
have beeh used by tlie public in general more than anv time in five .vears. 
It i8 patronized largely by the children and we are very careful to give 
them books that will Wnefit them. 

The school has a small library but use the public library for History, 
Scienct^ Poems, ('lassies. Natural History and also a gii'at many ar- 
ticles from the different i-eviews on the tables. 

The clubs find the library a great benefit to (hem and are allowed the 
privilege of books not in circulation to the general public. 

We have SMiiH circnlating books; these do not include government or 
state reports; 141 refei'vn<'e books, and SiiO bound magazines. 

In the past year, added to the library C5 books, 1 atlas, i i-eference. 



TRAVKKKE CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Helen Stoit, Luirabiax. 

The two most important activities of our library for the past year 
ai-e the opening of a branch and starting the story hour for the children. 
The branch is in the Oak Park wliool building and was started witli 
about four hundred volumes. After being open two months there are 
300 patrons enrolled, most of them children, and -.(i34 books have been 
given out. Books are sent from the main every week or two and 
changed as often as necessary. The branch is open every afternoon and 
will be o|>en evenings as soon as tlie electric lights are connected. 

The story hour work for the children was started in October. There 
are two story hours a week at the main and two at the branch. One 
hour there are fairy stories for the little ones and at the other King 
Arthur stories. 

Co-operating with one of the mothers' clubs we have arranged a list 
of books for children by grades. This list is published in pamphlet 
form and has l)een distributed throughout the schools. It is very success- 
ful and we have more calls for the stories on the list than we can supply. 

There has I>een a very encouraging increase in the use of the reading 
rooms and in the reference work. Our percentage of class books issued 
is larger than it was last year. 

The librarian spent four months in Cleveland, working and studying 
their system. That may not lie considered part of the activity of the 
library, but it has lieli)ed the work very much and has resulted in the 
story-hour work and a good many other improvements. 

Our library has l»een completely recajalogued in the last year and a 
half. The Hewey decimal system was nseil. 



i.vL.ooglc 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



VASSAR SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

W. Sherman' Lister, Librarian. 

Number volumes — about l.HOO. 

Volumes withdrawn — for refereiif-e, 2,000; for general reading, 800. 
Volumes added during year — 70. 
Amount expended for books — $79.18. 

New cases for bookB Iiave been made and library catalogued according 
to the decimal system. 



YPSILASTI LADIES' LIBRARY. 
Lucy B. LooMis, Lidrakian. 

All our work has been purely local, as, despite our age, we are not 
sufficiently strong to branch out in other directions. Our efforts have 
been especially directed towards the enlargement of our reference li- 
brary, as that branch of our work is growing steadily. In this, we have 
been very successful. 

The revision of our card catalog and the preparation of a printed one 
for the benefit of patrons who send for books have furnislied work for 
the time, not demande«l by the regular routine of library work. 

This report seems meager, but we shall hope for greater results now 
that we are established on a sound foundation. 



YPSILANTI ri'BLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Miu)RKD S. Smith, Libharian. 

The Public School Library of Ypsilanti now numbers 6,-170 volumes. 
During year ending Sept. 1, IHOfi, IGl volumes added. Care has to be 
taken in buying books to get only what is needed of the Iiest and not a 
large number, as the library is small and there is very little space for 
putting in new stacks. One new caKe of !."> shelves has just been placed 
in a convenient place for the grade chiJdi'en. Juvenile books of all kinds 
are kept here. 

No data is kept of circulation of hooks. 

We take 17 perioilicals. Readers" Oiiide to Periodical Literature and 
a Chicago daily newspaper. 

The grade libraries (branches of thisl in the ward schools have been 
looked over, rebound, and reclassified. Nearly all fiction taken out and 
placed in main library, thus increasing circulation of main library. 

A steady increase in the use of the library by high school students 
and grade children has been felt this past year, as well as by alumni 
attending normal and university. 



l.;>L.OOglC 



REPORTS STATE FEDERATION WOMEN'S CLUBS. 



STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 

First District. 
JosEPEiiNE C. Priest, Detroit, Bepokt. 

Your member from the First District respectfully reports tliat the 
work of library extension done this year by the local comniittees has 
surpassed that of the preceding year. 

The Twentieth Club has placed six traveling libraries as follows: 
Two in the school at Kcorse, one in the Michigan Alkali Works at Ford. 
Three were ordered at the Princess Manufacturing Co., Detroit, but 
only two could be supplied under the State Library rules. The Detroit 
Review Club has established five traveling libraries and three special in 
the following places: Banner Laundering Co., C. H. Hat>erkorn & Co., 
Bay Chemical Co., Zacharias & Mason Co., Northville Woman's Club, 
Elsie Woman's Study Clnb, Clarkston Woman's Literary Club. Zelima 
& Jewish Woman's Club have placed three this year, one at Alex. Gor- 
don's Cigar Manufactory, Zacharias Shirt Waist Factory and also at 
Arci Club, Wayne. 

Five of the large plants who were supplied from the State Library 
last year returned their books as they found that the City Library would 
furnish them with 150 volumes at one time, delivering and collecting 
free of charge. The club women feel that they have done a good work 
in bringing about this movement on the part of the City Library, for this 
work should have been done years ago. However, there is much for the 
women to do, for the enlargement of the city limits by the addition of 
Delray, Woodmere and Rouge, with their large manufactories and nu- 
merous employes, creates a demand for library work. 

The public schools of our city are well supplied with reading matter 
from the city library. 

There are three social settlements in the pastern portion of the city, 
in which district the shims of our city may be found. These settle- 
ments are doing much for the upbuilding of humanity, young and old; 
city library furnishes books for their use. 

Impromptu talks by competent citizens are given at (he central li- 
brary every Saturday afternoon in the children's department and will 
be carricil on at the several branches as soon as suitable accommoda- 
tions can be found. There are now six branch libraries oiierating in 
rented rooms with one exception, the first branch library Imilt and 
owned by the City Library ('ommiuNion has just been formally opened, 
corner of Field and Agnes avenues. The shelves will have 3,0(10 Iwoks. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Second I>!STRirT. 
Makv S. Miller, Adrian, Report. 

It is with uiiDf:)^'<] feelings of plojiHure and regn-t that I present this 
i-cport, reyi-et that so little. Beeuiincl.v, ha8 been aci-onipliahed. pleasure 
that the cUibs of mv district ai-e at hist awakening in some degree to 
the .iinportanee of the work, and exei-ring theniHclvf^s to do what they 
<an to help along the ranse of library extension, 

Thei-e ai-e at present 2(t clubs in the Second District. The rbautauqiia 
Kendiug Circle of Moreuci has. I am informed, Iteen disbanded. 

The following olubs have library conniiittees ready for work: Adrian 
Woman's riuh. Woman's Literary Club. Plymouth. Northville Woman's 
Club, Saturday Club. Manchester, Monday Club. Tecumseh. 

The following clubs report themselves without library committees: 
Friday Clul), Hudson. Home (Culture Club. Mistletoe Club. Mosaic Club, 
A'iolet Crown Chth, Tuesday (.'Inb, Phoenix Circle, all of Jackson, Wo- 
man's league, U. of M.. Ann Arbor, Ladies' Literary Club, Ypsilanti. 

Information gained from reports of various chibs: 

Tecumseh and Hudson have Carnegie libraries, valued at 110.000,00 
each, and ground will soon be broken in Adrian for a f25.000.O0 
Carnegie library. 

The Hudson and Tecumseh libraries are patronize)! by the [leople of 
the surrounding country. 

The one mill tax gives Hudson Library an in<-ome of tt,900.00 an- 
nually, but the contingent fund gets the |ieual fines. The Woman's 
Literary Club gave $25.00 towards the purchase of books, and the Fri- 
day Cluh bought a fine electric clock for this library. 

The library committee of the Monday Chib, Tecnmseh. reports that 
all districts schools in that neighborhood, except one, have libraries in 
the school buildings, none exceeding 100 volumes, and that all the penal 
fines are used for the purchase of books. The farmers in this vicinity 
are an unusually well educated, cultui-ed class, and fully appreciate the 
l>eneflts of a good library. 

School libraries in Hunimit and Merrimau Districts. Jackson County, 
are I'eported ^erv good. The amount of library moneys, however, is 
usually so small that district libraries suffer accordingly, unlras aided 
by private parties. 

Manchester, Washtenaw County, has a good township library, con- 
sisting of several hundred books by standard anthoi's. This year they 
had J.'W.!)2 in the fund to be spent for new books. 

Spafford District School, the only one in the township in which Man- 
chester is situated having a library of its own. has a good one consist- 
ing of over two hundred of the best books, which are constantly being 
added to. It is supported by private contribntions and socials. 

Two traveling libraries are in use in Manchester, as the result of the 
efforts of (iie library committee of the Saturday Club, and a talk given 
there by Mrs. Sp*;uccr on library extension, one in the eighth grade of 
the public schools, and one by the chib in its own work. Both these 
libraries are valued very highly, DisrizHd^y^iOOQlC 



REPORTS STATE FEDERATION WOMEN'S CLUBS. 63 

Pl.vnioiith has no public library, and as the villajp" is heavily in debt 
already, the library committee of the Woman's Literary Club feel that 
it would not now be possible to obtain the extra taxation newssary to 
establish one. They are very ambitious. neverthelesR, to see a library 
established thei'e, and are using every effort to attain the desired end. 

As a thorough investigation was made last winter in regard to 
the use of the penal fines in the towii»hip and district libraries in the 
country around Adi-ian. thei-e was little left for the library committee 
of the Woman's riub to do in this direction. The committee is organ- 
ized and ready for any work that may be asked of them durintt the 
coming year. We have used the (raveling libraries for several years in 
our club work and have found them of great benefif to our ladies. 

On the morning of November 4t!i, last, I spoke before the Hillsdale 
County Teachers' Institute on the subject of library extension. The 
teachers seemed much interested and asked several (jueations concerning 
it, but I d^ not know whether my talk hei-e resulted in any increased 
demand for the traveling library throughout Hillsdale county. 

On March 7th I read a pai>er at Tecnmseh heftu-e the I*nawee County 
Federation, at which meeting the repi-esenta fives of seven clubs were 
present. .Although no definite action was taken in the matter I feel 
assured that I succeeded in making the library work much more a living 
issue to them than it had ever been before, and that no small proportion 
of the progress T have previously noted was the result of this meeting. 



TiiiRo DisrnicT. 

(lERTKLDE K. I'HINDLE, CllARLOTTE, KePORT. 

This i-eport lias to be confined almost entirely to Eaton county; al- 
though the counties of Kalamazoo. Branch, (Calhoun and Hillsdale are 
in this district. I have had but few communications from the clubs in 
these counties, I have mailed circular letters to each club and urged 
them to '"do something" and then make a full report. 

In May the Katon County Federation of Women's Clubs met in Char- 
lotte. I was present and made an ap|>eal for library extension, calling 
particular attention to the school libraries, urging that each club meni- 
lier make an effort to have the fines collected for any breach of the i>enal 
laws and used for library purposes. I find that this money is not 
expended for this purpose entirely and in many districts the money has 
been allowed to remain unex[>ended for several years. 

The county eommiasioner kindly allowed me to examine the school 
inspector's reports for the sixteen townships. I found some interesting 
things. In a total of liifi district schools there were !)0 libraries. These 
contained from 12 to :M> volumes, but only fifteen have added books the 
past year, making 75 districts that have not exi»ended their library 
money. Many of these re^Htrted no library fund and others had quite 
an amount in hand. The libraries that wen- increased added only a 
small number of volumes, most of them below ten, several only one. 
Perhaps three towns have township libraries, but these had received no 
more attention than the districts, I am very sure Eaton can make as 
good 'showing as any county and yet I see here a great field for club 
work. 



64 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS, 

I have lookt^ over the titles of several district libraries aod have not 
lieen pleased with the selection. One bookseller assured a committee 
for purchasing books that the "Mary J. Holmes type" was the favorite 
kind. 

I have a set of the circulating library finding lists and these have 
beeu loaned a number of times to help in making selections. Could a 
suitable list be sent to directors and library boards it would be helpful. 

A club in Beltevue was allowed to select the new volumes, to be added 
to the library. Undoubtedly other clubs could do this if they were in- 
terested and it would surely elevate the character of books. 

The material, circulars and reports sent by the state librarian have 
been as widely distributed as possible. If every teachers' institute and 
association could have a part of their program devoted to "good read- 
ing" or some phase of library work, it would bear good results. Club 
women could do this by calling the attention of the presidents of the 
different associations to the need of interest along this line and asking 
for a topic on the program. 

Fourth District, 

L. F. Andhews, Three Rivers, Report. 

When the great Bodleian Library in Oxford was opened in 1602 there 
were 2.000 volumes chained to their cases, neither king nor commoner 
could take a hook from the library. Charles the First and Cromwell 
were compelled to submit to this rule. 

The Btate of Michigan offers its citizens the free use of the latest, best 
and most valuable hooks published, and trained librarians to help select 
them. The earth revolves on its axis every twenty-four hours, but events 
move faster. The latest history of Kussia and Japan two years ago will 
not do today. 

The woman's club is educational and must keep up with the times. 
I«t each program committee make out a list of books needed for the 
year's work. If the local library cannot supply them send to the state 
librarian. If you have no library forward your program to the state 
librarian, she will furnish the necessary books for the cost of transporta- 
tion. 

Let each club appoint a committee to look after the school libraries in 
its vicinity, make a {lersonal visit if possible, see if the library money 
is used for books, confer with the teacher and director, be prepared to 
furnish a list of suitable books. The school commissioner should know 
the condition of every school and public library in the county, consult 
his Inst report, work with him. Bring the advantages, the necessity of 
public libraries before the people through the public press, present it at 
teachers' and farmers' institutes and at county federations. In cities 
advocate branch libraries in the outer wards, place traveling libraries 
in the large manufacturing establishments, in young men's and young 
women's christian associations, in every available place, encourage and 
foster a library spirit. 



i.>L.0Oglc 



Reports state federation women-s clubs. 



Fifth District. 
Ur8. Emma Kendrick, Grand Haven, Report. 

Ae Fifth District Library Committee I find greater needs for library 
work than I had expected. Comparatively few Bchools have libraries 
that are very helpful and many are a hindraDce to the better thoughts 
and life of the readers. Also find people slow to aee the benefits a li- 
brary would be to them compared with the small outlay of money or 
time. 

Last May I presented the library extension work to the Ottawa 
County Sunday School Teachers' Association. The delegates seemed 
delighted to know about the work and called for my address, hoping to 
secure a library. I wrote my address on the board so that all who wished 
it would have it correct. Expected to be literally snowed under with 
inquiries, but not one letter has come to tbis present time. 

I have tried to interest nearby clubs to take libraries, and succeeded 
only in my own club and Sunday school. Both societies enjoyed the 
books very much indeed. In our club-study of China we could hardly 
have prepared our papers without the library.- 

Have talked with several district school teachers and tried to interest 
them in the library extension work. Have written to each of the county 
school commissionei's in my district and received some help from them. 
I sent six packages of literature where I thought they would do good; 
have written eight letters. Considerable time was sfwnt in studying the 
work, as I find it requii-es a knowledge eatii-ely new to me and quite com- 
plicated. One's whole time might be given to it with profit. Little can 
be accomplished unless one tan come in personal touch with the people, 
and that must be foilowf'd up every year or even oftener. Something 
like four years ago Mr. W. Batchelor of Chicago, formerly of Orand 
Haven, died and by the terms of his will the city of (irand Haven was 
left $10,0(H) for a public library. There was great rejoicing in our 
wonwn's club and among the people generally. Mr. Batchelor left the 
matter eutii-ely with the nuiyor and council to provide a site and have 
the building at a certain stage of completion at the end of two years, or 
the money should revert to a nephew who was executor of the will. 
Time rolh'd on and iietijde tatkcil and were worried lest we might lose 
the library, still nothing was done; finally a c(>mmitte«! visiled the 
nephew, Mr. KhipiM'y of Clii<'ago, to ascertain if the time would lie ex- 
tended. He graciously said yes. They also asked if he would be 
willing if they could secure a gift from Mr. (Jarnegie to add to 
the amount, so that we might have a larger and finer library. He 
had no objections. They then had a confei-ence with Mr. Carnegie and 
he consented. Still nothing being done by the city, and as the two years 
was about to expire tliey took a vote of the jwople and decided where 
the library should l>e placed. There the matter dropi>ed and a few 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Sixth Disthict. 
Mrs. Augusta Barnks, Howell, Bepmit. 

The outlook in the Cth District is encouraging for library extension. 
The library work in any district is too vast to be thoroughly worked 
by a BiDgle cbairniiin. We need the help of a field organizer who has 
sufficient salary to devote his whole time to the work. In the 6th Dis- 
trict ladies libraries are niaintuined at Birmingham, Rochester and 
Pontine. Carnegie libraries at Howell, Lansing and Flint. The new 
Carnegie Library at Howell was dedicated November 19, 1906. Rev. 
.1. M. Ilarkley of Detroit gave the principal address; subject, "The 
Value of a Hook." The library contains 2,197 volumes; 408 volumes 
were presented to the library by the children of the late Mrs. Jennie 
R. Mcl'herson as a memorial to their mother. The Howell Ladies' Li- 
brary turned over their books of 1,340 volumes. The building is placed 
in the center of McPherson Park and ia a model of its kind and the 
furniture is new and up to date. The Howell Woman's Club has placed 
a fine fountain at the southeast corner of the park. The cost of the 
building is fl5,000. It is maintained by a tax not to exceed one mill 
on the taxable property of tlie township of Howell, 

Clubs using state traveling libraries made up especially for clubs — 
Howell, Flint, Williamston and Pontiac. I have also placed two 
traveling libraries, one with Hamburg Farmers' Club and one with the 
Ost*ola Grange of Livingston Co. 

We have found county commissioners and other officials very re- 
ticent in r^ard to the disposition of library moneys. We are trying 
however to besiege them on all sides and keep the library money in its 
pi'Oper channel. The library sentiment is slowly but surely growing, 
and there is much encouragement all along the line. The field organizer 
is the need of the hour and we hojte that our state commissioners will 
find a way to supply this ne<>d. 

Reports of Ix»cal Ijbraky Committct:s, Sixth Congressional District. 

Birmingham, Mich. 
I fear I have little to report. Our lyiidies' Library is in existence, 
plodding along, waiting to sec a chance to make a free public library. 
Have fri*^! to phu'e a traveling library^no auci-ess. Wish you would 
discuss, at your Board meeting, how to reach clubs. Our committee 
sent ^00 letters — 'M answered. 

M. BALDWIN.Tle 

Onondaga, Mich. 
Wc are not usinir a circuLitinL' libinrv from the Slate Librnrv. Wfi 



The Ladies' Library contains 4,000 volumes. Societ.v owns bui)tling 
and proceeds of library are nsed for books. Ojie hundred fifty-five vol- 
umes have been purchased this year. There ip a large school library 
with librarian in attendant* all through the jear. One or two other 
advertising schemes have been started at storeq, but I cannot say with 
anv success. 

MRS. A. P. NEWBEBRY. 

Williamston, Mich. 
Our public school has a good library of over 1,000 volumes; 
Our Woman's Club has books from the State Library each year, 
which are of great use in our work. I think alt the rural schools here- 
abouts have libraries, Bonie of them very good. The library sentiment 
was not strong enough to establish a public library in Williamston, 
though gi-eat effoi-t was made three years ago. The W. C. T. U, keep 
a reading and rest room oi)en afternoons. 

NELLIIC A. HAMMOND. 



Seventh District. 
Elsie H. PL.vTr. I'okt Hukon. Kei'ort, 

During the year I have sent to every possible club and person the 
literature sent me from Lansing: and as soon as the Federated ("lub 
annua) came, I renewed my attack upon those in my district. When- 
ever practicable, 1 offered to do Homefhing for them if tliey would in- 
vestigate the literary conditions in their vicinilies and report. F<»r in- 
stance, for the one studying Holland I suggested little Delft water- 
colors for souvenirs, and to another studying Shake8i>eare T offered to 
enlist the help of some uf our teachers and students who have fine 
libraries on the subject, and are in correspondence with world renowned 
authorities. These offers rec;'iveJ no acknowledgment. 

Tiring of futile ai>iteals to self-satisfied clubs, I concluded to try to 
reach isolated school districts by advertising. From our home jmiwr I 
procured the names of all the newspapei-s in the Seventh District; when 
inai-e than one in a town, I chose the one having the larger circulation. 
In these 1 prepaid an advertiweuicnt. whi<h was to run several weeks, to 
this effect: 

"WANTED: To entablisli a Traveling Library in every town where 
this paiHT is read." (Samples of tlii*e were sent to Mrs. SpL'ucer.) 

This scheme not producing any astonishing results, I re'<o]ved to 
push the campaign into the very heart of the country by sending cards 
and circulars to the librarians of the school districts as uhtained from 
the official rei«»rt. I selected postoflSces' remote from one another, and 
in many instances used the phrase. "I notice in the report of the Library 
Commissioners there are blanks opposite the name of your district." 
By this I hoped to stimulate a little rivalry. In this way / atlnnptr.d 
to reach over half of the librarians catalogued. This resulted in a few 
replies pnd inquiries, I answered and encouraged and referred the ap- 



D,g,,z.d by Google 



— pnraimrTTrmTnspcnrar: mee prinifi mnture i nave nev^r neuni «i it. 

One of niy rounties (Mncoiiib) is not in tliis report. Wishing to 
awaken sonic interest in library matters, I inserted in the county paiiers 
the following notice: 

"WANTED: BtatistieB concerninp Library privileges in the Distriet 
Schools of Macomb County. Will reward by sending framed picture 
suitable for schoolroom. Address Library Committee, 1225 Sixth St., 
Port Huron, Mich." 

Receiving no replies, I wrote to every postmaster in the county, call- 
ing his attention to the advertisement which was to appear in the next 
Sunday's edition, and asking him to call people's attention to the notice. 
Still ,no results. The county is largely summer resort and possibly 
tbey have no schools. 

One of my co-workers tells me that she addressed a Teachers' Institute. 
I think it a good plan, but I have not the assurance to do it. Instead 
I wrote about fifty notices and had one of the members distribute 
them. In these I set forth, briefly, the traveling library scheme, and 
offered to give a painting or photograph to any one who would locate 
one. Also i-equested the attendants to call at my house for further par- 
ticulars. No one called, but I hope tbey have not forgotten the incident. 
Among my acquaintances is an itinerant prea<'her. whom I have asked 
to investigate conditions in the country plate's that he visits. I'rob- 
ably he has forgotten all about it.) Also, women of leisure who ride 
around have been timidly approached, bnt their efforts, if any, have not 
been reported. 

Now, these experiments have not been met witli great success, and 
I have exhausted my ingenuity on the subject. 

At present I am engaged in sending copies of the International — a 
local publication — to my "constituents," because of the article by the 
librarian of our Carn^ie Library. 



BKntTii nisraicT. 
Anna A. I'ai,mer, Saginaw. Kki-okt. 

Your committee has made but tittle effort, outside those towns which 
have Women's Clubs, and from these otnhs most of our infornmtion has 
been secured and through their efforts the library work has been car- 
ried on. 

All of these places have at least one public or district library, and 
the club women have taken interest in patronizing and building up the 
small and feeble library. 

One of our villages is uniquely situated in two townships, and there 
ai-e two small township libraries. The Woman's Ctnb of the place sought 
to have a village lot set aside for a consolidated library, but the voters 
turned the proposition down. However, the club women will try again, 
perhaps with success. Several clubs own small and growing . libraries. 
A few, among them, the Saginaw Reading Club and the Saginaw Art 
Club, have quite extensive libraries of tbpir own; yet these clubs, situ- 
ated in a large city well equipped with public libraries, make use of the 



Coo';;le 



Unondaga, Mien. 
I the State Librarv. We 



state travi'Iing libraricfl in Iheir work' TIu'ho (iliilis als^mnnpi^*^ 
librarips to further use by loaning books to other study rluba. 

Yonr coniinittee sent out a forniulateil list of qupfitions on library 
work to every club in tlie eighth district, and from the replies received 
gathered valuable information in compact form. Perhaps a uniform 
list of such questions sent to the clubs throughout the state would as- 
sist in securing a simplified statement of all work done and at the 
same time be a suggestion of the desired lines of effort. 

Your committee has also sent out the valuable literature furnished by 
the State Board of Library Commissioners, together with the excellent 
circular letter of the Chairman of the Federation Library committee. 

This work is pre-eminently the work of the Women's Clubs in the 
smaller towns and villages, where the district and township libraries 
are old and uninviting, and your committee would urge upon these clubs 
especially the recommendations of the State Board of Library Oomniis- 
sioners, that these libraries may lie strengthened and enlivened by the 
right kind of new books and environment. Your committee desires to 
acknowledge the valuable help of our efHcient state librarian, Mrs, Mary 
Spencer, in this work. 

Next year the outlook is for more advance all along the lines of this 
important library work. 



Ninth District, 
Mrs. fi. A. Bakstow, Onbkaha, Report. 

While I cannot report the enthusiasm in the work in this district that 
I would like, yet I feel there is an undercurrent at work and, as time 
prf^resscs, good will come of it. In my own county, that of Manistee, 
the growth can i-eadily l>e s<>en by the ambition displayed and the call 
for libraries and demand for good books. 

My greatest difficulty, and what gives me cause for serious thinking, is 
how to reach the other counties and imbibe the same spirit for good 
books into each district. The clubs have been written to so much that 
I feel their patience is almost exhausted, and in presenting my report, 
ask the advisability of sending a pamphlet or personal letter to the dis- 
trict officers in such districts where libraries are almost unknown. Re- 
cently I had the following communication published in our couiity 
weekly paper: 

"Free Libraries. 

"Thousands of Iwoks are piled up on the shelves in the State Library, 
purchased for the use of the people of Michigan. For several years 
pome of these books had not been used, when the State Librarian asked 
|)ermission to group them into sets and send them out to the people as 
free libraries. Since this has been done there has l>een a much wider 
circulation, but as yet the hooks have not reached all the communities 
or districts. Any district, grange, farmer's club, women's club, church 
organization, taxpayers' organization, in fact, any reliable association 
organized for the purpose of study and improvement, may receive a set 



(by Google 



OT TiTTV OT rnese doors oy appi.ving lor tnem, inese are Known as tne 
free traveling libraries. However, if the organisation applying for a 
set, already has a library of its own, and merely want an addition they 
ean secure a registered library of one hundred books. 

"The only expense on any set will be the transportation, whieh is very 
small. 

"Any further information will be cheerfully given by application to 
Mrs. Geo. A. Barstow, Chairman of Library ConjiniBBion of Ninth Con- 
gressional District, Onekama, Mich." 

I also ask this committee the advisability of sending such a communi- 
cation to the county paper for publication in each of my counties. 

In addition to the libraries placed before, which are constantly being 
renewed, we have added Bear Lake, Ambrose and Onekama High School. 

Tenth Distoict. 
Mrs. C. W. Fallass, Petoskey, Repmit. 

The report for the 10th district along the lines of library work is 
anything hut encouraging. As in the previous year my work has con- 
sisted in writing letters, urging co-operation among the various federated 
clubs and endeavoring to interest country clubs, and some of the lead- 
ing citizens in some of the nearby towns in securing traveling libraries. 
Also in distributing all printed matter sent me for that purpose. Only 
a few have even replied and none wish to secure a traveling library. 

Of the seven federated clubs in this district, only one filled out the 
blank for report of Library committee. This was the Ijadies' Library 
Clut> at East Tawas. which has a library of two hundred and eight 
volumes in their club room. 

The money from fines is not used for purchase of books. 

Petoskey now has a free public library and reading room, containing 
1,730 volumes. It is well shelved and catalogued, and is well patronized. 
The money from fines, amounting \q three hundred and fifty dollars and 
over, has been used for the pur<'lm8e of hooks entirely for the last year 
or two. This year one hundred dollars was given the public library, the 
remainder t)eing used for reference books in the High School. During 
the past year the common <'ouncil has appropriated eight hundrei dol- 
lars for the maintenance of the library, 

Ab I have said before. 1 have not succeeded in introducing any travel- 
ing libraries in this district. The school commissioner of Kmmet C«. 
informs me that he ke]it a traveling library in his office for three months, * 
hoping fo interest those who came to him from the country districts, 
but no one seemed to i-ealiKC the opportunity the state offers for secur- 
ing good reading matter. The only thing that made any impression was 
the charge of one dollar and a quarter for the transportation of fifty 
good books to be used three months or six, if desired. 

The only hope I have at present is through the teachers. At my re- 
quest one enthusiastic teacher, who knows the value of good books, not 
only for her children but for other people's children, talked on the sub- 
ject of traveling libraries, at the Teachers' Institute held at Pellston, 
in November, wliieli seemed to arons? considerable interest among the 
teachers. 



;.,Coo';;[c 



Unondaga, Mien. 
I the Rliite Library. We 



• REPORTS STATE PEDERATION WOMEN'S CLUBS. 71 

We will trust that the Beed Bown haB fallen od good ground and that 
in time it will bring forth fruit bo abundantly that the 10th district will 
compare favorably with its Bister districts in availing itself of the library 
privileges which the state bo generously provides. 



Klbvbnth District, 
Mkb. O. p. Cahvkb, Tbaverse <'ity, Repokt. 

The library conditions in Traverse City are very good. We have a 
fine city Library with one branch library in Oak Park school build- 
ing, a Ladies' Library Association and good libraries in Central 
■Hchool Building, also in our ward schools. I have placed five librarieB 
during the past year, two at the We-guetoug Club, two in schools in 
the country and one in a lumber camp in Alger county, a little out of 
my district, but was told that it would be all right, and I find they have 
a traveling library at Kllk I^ke Orange in my district. 

I have not been able to establish any libraries or place any special 
libraries, but hope to during tlie coming year. 

Twelfth District. 
Lecia D. Strachan, Saui,t Ste. Marie, Report. 

I feel that the interest in library extension is on the increase and that 
another year will take in many of the out of the way places. 

Pour libraries were placed by your eeci-etary this year, all in Chip- 
pewa Co. 

The work Is on the increase and we are bound to succeed. We hope, 
during the coming year, to get in closer touch with the counties west 
of us. 



Dig,, z.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



■.?-■(" 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

UNIV. OK Bi.O 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY CilMlSSlONERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOR YKAK ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1907. 



OHD CO, SI.VTIC 1 KINThH-; 



.L.oogle_ 



D,„„.db, Google 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE BOARD 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS 



MICHIGAN 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1)07. 



D,j,,!,d.,L.oogle 



D,„„.db, Google 



State 

Board op Libr-^ry Commissioners 

Lansing, Mich. 



Mr. David E. Ueineman, Detrcii. 

Preaident. 
Mr. H. R. Pattenoill, LaDsing. 
Mr, Henry Nelson Loud, Au Sjble. 
Mr. FREDBRtCK J. Baldwin, Ctral. 
Mhb. M, C. Spencer, Lansing, 

Secretary. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 

January 2, 1908. 
Hon. Fred M. Warnkr, 

Governor of Michigan: 

Sir — I have the honor to submit the eighth annual report of the State 
Board of Library Commissioners for the year ending December 31, 1907. 
Very respectfully, 

David E. Heineman, 

President. 



Dignz.d by Google 



D,„„.db, Google 



Paoe. 

Report of Secretaiy 7 

Libraiy Not«a 9 

Library Organizer 14 

County OrganiEer 15 

Library Training in Nonnal Schools 19 

Anociate Libraries 33 

Registered Libraries H 

Library Committee, State Federation of Women's Guba M 

Library Statistics by Counties 60 

Library Statistics Northern Michigan 1*10 

State Teachers' Association — '^^^ 

Upper Peninsula Educational AuBOclati.n — '^ 



Dignz.dbyGoO'^le 



D,„„.db, Google 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 

Three meetings of the State Board of Library Commissionera were held 
during the year 1907, as follows: 

Detroit, April 4ih. 

Lansing, November 13th. ' 

Detroit, December 2l8t. 

During the year two appointments were made by the Governor to fill 
the places of those members whose terms expired upon that date; 

Mr. F, J, Baldwin, of Coral, to succeed Mr. Peter, of Saginaw. 

Mr. Heineman, of Detroit, to succeed himself. 

The meetings of the Board were all important as planning the activities 
for the year, most of which plans have been successfully carried out. 

It was decided to place an organizer in the field whose duty it should be 
to carry on library work on. educational lines. The appointment of Mr. 
pr- D. Bailey, of Gaylord, who was endorsed by H. R. Pattengilt and Walter 
H. French, Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction, was decided 
upon by the Board. Mr. Bailey has had large experience as a County Com- 
missioner of Schools, and is familiar with the educational plans of this State. 

It was also decided to continue the library classes in the Normal Summer 
Schools, and the Secretary was instructed to arrange for that work. The 
arrangements were also made for the library classes held in connection with 
the State Teachers' Association at Battle Creek, October 24th, 25th, and 26th. 
The details connected with these plans were successfully carried on, as shown 
by the statements embodied in this report. 

At the meeting of November 13th, the following ofEcerg were elected: 
Mr. David E. Heineman, President; Mrs. M. C. Spencer, Secretary. 

The important topics discussed at this meeting were the cooperation of 
the State Board of Library Commissioners with the State Association of 
Librarians. The matter was, however, left in abeyance until the full meet- 
ing of the Board could be held. This meeting occurred in Detroit, December 
21, 1907, and the minutes show the matter as follows: 

Resolved, That a quarterly bulletin be published by the Board of State 
Auditors, part of the material included in this to be furnished by the State 
Association of Librarians and a certain amount of space to be allowed for 
that purpose, this amount to be determined by consultation with the Secre- 
tary of the Library Association. 

Resolved, That acting on the suggestion of the State Association of 
Librarians, the Board of Library Commissioners will pay the exp)en8es of 
two Round Tables to be held under the auspices of the Association, the 
expenses to consist of the traveling expenses of a director and the printing 
connected with the work. 

Resolved, That the training classes for librarians in the Normal Summer 
Schools be carried on as heretofore. The Secretary was instructed to 
make the same arrangements that were made last year for that purpose. 

The question as to the feasibility of conducting a training school for 



8 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

librarians at the capitol was brought before the Board. The subject was 
thoroughly canvassed and it was decided to arrange for this school, provided 
enough librarians would agree to take the course to make the results com- 
mensurate with the ex[>enses incurred. The Secretarj- was instructed to 
correspond with teachers and make a later report to the Board. 

County Oi<b.\Niz&R. 

The work done by Mr. R. D. Bailey, the County Organizer, is of special 
importance. Mr. Bailey, as teacher and County Commissioner ef Schools, 
has come closely in touch with library matters, and this added to his sympar 
thetic interest in the betterment of the educational interests of the State, 
has largely increased his usefulness as an organizer. His work done in the 
more isolated portions of the State, and in connection with the Fanners' 
Institutes, has been most satisfactory in results. 

Library Section op State Teachers' Association. 

The papers which were read in the library and other sections of the State 
Teachers' Association, held in Battle Creek, October 24th-26th, 1907, are 
included in this report. 

The initiative movement on this line was more successful and the work 
will be planned for next year in a still larger and more complete way. The 
Board wishes to gratefully acknowledge the help which it received from 
the hearty cooperation of the educational forces of the State. 

Organization of Libraries. 

The technical organization of libraries has not been extensive, owing 
to the limited amount of money available for this purpose. The report of 
those engaged in this work will show, however, that enough has been done 
to emphasize the great good which would result from an extension of this 
important branch of commission activities. 

Library Training in Summer Normal Institutes. 

The reports made by the instructors of the classes in Librar>' Methods 
conducted in the Summer Institutes held in the Normal Schools at Kalamazoo, 
Mt. Pleasant, and Marquette, show a satisfactory advance in that work 
over the previous year. The instruction was elementary in its character 
and designed especially for teachers. Special courees of lectures were given 
on children's work and reference books. While the classes were small, 
the general interest taken in the work showed a decided growth in library 
sentiment. The classes will be carried on during the coming summer, with 
an increase in the number of instructors and an enlargement of the course. 

Library Committee State Federation of Women's Clubs. 

The club women of the State have taken up the work of library extension 
with renewed vigor. Under the leadership of Mrs. Anna A. Palmer, an 
aggressive campaign has been planned, which will certainly result in a more 
thorough organization of the libraries in the rural schools, and the establish- 
ment of free public libraries in the smaller cities and villages. , LiOOQlC 



MICHIGAN STATE LIBRARY AND COMMISSION NOTES. 



MICHIGAN STATE LIBRARY AND COMMISSION NOTES. 

C. M. Burton recently came into possession of some papers of a man once 
well known and intimately associated with the political affairs of Michigan, 
Oren Marsh. Mr. Marsh was a busy young politician and when the State 
capitol was built he was appointed State Librarian. So far as appears, 
the function of the librarian was a labor of love, for no salary was allowed 
and the sole income of the library was from fines for the misuse of the privi- 
leges, which was used for the purchase of new books. 



The legislative reference department provided for by the legislature 
was established in the State library. Lewis M. Miller of Lansing and G. 
L, Clark of Detroit were placed in charge. Work has been going on, com- 
paring the present constitution of this State wilh the constitutions of other 
states. Mrs. Spencer received a letter from C. McCarthy, in charge of the 
legislative reference department of Wisconsin, congratulating her on the 
great work already done by the Michigan department authorized by the 
last legislature. In her reply Mrs. Spencer referred in terms of high praise 
to the excellent work of L. M, Miller and G. L, Clark, who have had charge 
of the department. They have accumulated a mass of information in re- 
gard to the constitutions of the various states that is aiding greatly in 
getting together material for the new constitution. 

The delegates to the constitutional convention which convened in October 
in the capitol have unsurpassed privileges for informing themselves as to 
every desirable feature of constitutions and constitutional building. The 
State library, maintained in the capitol, is well equip[>ed for general purposes 
and the law library is unequaled save possibly in New York and Massa- 
chusetts; it excels in its equipment of references pertaining to constitutions, 
as it has those of every state in the union, together with the proceedings 
and debates of constitutional conventions. The State Library has pre- 
pared compilations of references which enable one to turn in a moment 
to any subject imder investigation. 



Many citizens of Michigan know that the State Library is one of the finest 
in the country but few know of its activities in extending reading material 
to people throughout the State. Until 1895 the library was used for reference 
only by those who could come to Lansing. In 1893 the present Librarian 
secured the enactment of the law which opened the privileges of the library 
to all the people of the State. The only cost is that of transportation. The 
application of 15 or 20 taxpayers or that of any organization brings the case 
of 50 books selected by the Librarian not for entertainment purposes alone 
but to broaden and educate those who read the books. There are also the 
cases of pictures sent to any club or society, as well as framed pictures which 
are furnished to district schools and may be hung in the rooms for some time. 
The teacher of any school, also, may procure a library of 50 selected volumes 
by sending with the request $1.25 to apply toward the payment of freight. 
For the convenience of the teachers the Librarian has compiled finding 



10 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

lists from which the teacher may choose in ordering a library. Suitable 
collections of books will also be sent to Sunday schools, granges, -study 
clubs or individuals desiring to investigate along any line of study. 



The second annual course in library methods offered by the State Board 
of Library Commissioners in connection with the summer sessions of the 
State normal schools was given June 24 to August 2. This course was 
intended in no sense to be a substitute for a course in library training for 
library work, but to place before the teachers in the rural schools and the 
custodians of school libraries the elementary training which will enable 
them toselect,use,andhelpthepupi]B to use, the books to the best advantage. 
Miss Ruth M. Wright had charge of the course at the Central State Normal 
School, Mt. Pleasant, Miss Esther Braley gave the course at the Western 
State Normal School, Kalamazoo, and Miss OUve C. Lathrop was in charge 
at the Northern State Normal School, Marquette, Special lectures by 
Misses Ida M. Mendenhall, Ethel R, Sawyer and Grace E. Salisbury were 
given. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 
Alma. 

On March the 7th, word was received by President Bruske, of Alma college, 
from Andrew Carnegie stating that he had decided to give the college an 
endowment of $25,000. 



The corner stone for the $27,000 Carnegie library was laid November 5. 
Addresses were made by Mayor King; Superintendent of Schools, Miekens: 
Pres. Anthony of the Adrian college. Attorney Clarke, and Mrs. F. E. Priddy. 

AnuADA. 

The Armada Free Public Library, orgamzed August 10, 1901, is located 
in rented quarters on the second floor of the Barrows block. The library 
is supported by a township tax and governed by a board of trustees. Bool^ 
are loaned to residents of the township free and to those outside the township 
on payment of $0.50 a year. The library contains 1,314 bound volumes; 
92 books were added during the year. Armada has 486 borrowers of a 
population of 863. The circulation of books during the year was about 
5,100, besides the 196 reference books used in the library. The periodicals 
subscribed for are: World's Work, Outlook, Review of Reviews, Youth's 
Companion, McClure's, Atlantic Monthly, Bay View, Electrician and 
Mechanic, Public Libraries, A. L. A. Booklist. The income of the library 
for the purchase of books, salaries, rent, etc., is $400.00 a year. 

Elizabeth Pomeroy, Librarian. 



l.;>L.OOglC 



LIBRARY NOTES. H 

Battle Creek. 

A circulating library was installed at the Y. M. C. A. in September. The 
library is a branch of the State Library. In the library of 50 books are 
standard works of fiction, literature, biography, ethics, sociology, history, 
religion, natural science and art. The consignments wilt be renewed every 
three months. The same rules govern the circulation of these books as of 
those in the Willard library, 

Birmingham. 

Thirty-seven years ago the Good Templars Lodge in Birmingham dissolved. 
Something over $2 was refunded to each member, 19 of whom decided to 
put their share of this money into a librar>'. The resulting organization 
called the Birminghani Library Association has succeeded in building up 
a library of 2,400 volumes and in erecting a building on which rested a 
mortgage of about S2,000 held by Miss Martha Baldwin. Two yeara ago 
the oi^anization offered the books to Birmingham with which to start a 
public library. The gift was not accepted. This year the books and building, 
the mortgage of which was canceled by Miss Baldwin, were offered. The 
vote favoring the acceptance was 110 to 100. The town may dispose of 
the present site providing the money secured from the sale is turned into 
a new and more modem building to be erected on the comer lot directly 
west of the present building which is a part of the library property. The 
library was oi^nized in the fall and Miss Daisy Durkee was appointed 
librarian. 

Cadillac. 

The Cadillac public library building though called a Carnegie library 
is the result of large gifts from W. W. Mitchell, D. F. Diggins and W. W. 
Cummer, as well as from Andrew Carnegie. Only a year old, the library 
contains 5,000 volumes, all of which new books have been donated by Cadillac 
people, W. W. Mitchell alone sent in a check of S2,500 for books. 

.Charlevoix. 

In February the Board of Education in Charlevoix pledged J1,000 annually 
for the maintenance and support of a librarj- on the Carnegie plan. Mr. 
Carnegie gave J10,000 for the building and the site will be provided by 
popular subscription. 

DETRorr. 

The urgent need of a new public library building in Detroit was put before 
the citizens by pamphlets issued by the librarian, Henry M. Utiey, and 
by the newspapers. The bill prepared by Commissioner D. B. iJuffield 
providing for the bonding of the city for $750,000 for the erection of a new 
public library building and introduced in the legislature by Senator Bland 
in May fdiled to pass. 

ECKFORD. 

The traveling librarj' ordered by the Eckford Farmers' club for one year, 
containing 50 books, was received in April. l^ hhi. .> LiOOQlC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



Helen D. Gorton of Madison, a graduate of the Wisconsin library echool, 
and for three years engaged in cataloging at the Racine public library, haa 
been chosen librarian for the Camegie public library at Escajiaba. 

Harbor springs. 

Leahy & Glenn, who have been awarded the contract for the library 
, building, will begin the work at once and expect to have the building ready 
for occupancy by May 1st, 1908. 



Village President J. D. S, Hansen has been in correspondence with Andrew 
Carnegie's secretary relative to a library building for Hart. 

Hastings. 

In February, on Library Day at the Woman's club, Miss Anna Pollard, 
of the Ryerson public library at Grand Rapids, gave a helpful talk. Miss Pol- 
lard recommended organizing a library at Hastings under'the school library 
law, as that will give the library the benefit of the fine money which is de- 
voted to library purposes. She emphasized the necessity of getting the 
library well started in a community under a trained librarian who will supply 
the intellectual needs of the people and encourage better reading, rather 
than putting the resources into a fine library building, 

Houghton, 

Miss Olive Gibbs has been appointed librarian of the new free public 
library of the Houghton schools which opened in March. 

Howell. 

The Camegie library at Howell is undoubtedly one of the finest that can 
be found in the State. The building stands in the center of^a whole square, 
which was given to the city by McPherson brothers, and was built of native 
granite. The library was dedicated in November and Miss Lucy Chapel was 
appointed librarian. The children of the late Mrs. McPherson gave $500 
-worth of books and the ladies' library gave 2,000 volumes, A law was 
passed in 1903 allowing the adjoining towns to unite in the use and sup- 
port of the library, but it has not yet been taken advantage of by those 
whom it would benefit. 

Iron Mountain, 

Miss Margaret McVety resigned from the Camegie public library in June 
and in July Miss Sabra L, Nason, a graduate of Carlton college, and from 
the Illinois state library school, was elected to succeed her. 



Fire in the public library on November 20, caused a loss on books of $5,000 
and on the building of 110,000, The library, which cost $75,000 aJid, con- 
tains 40,000 volumes, is the gift of Dr. and Mrs, E. H. Van Deusenl^s"- 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



Marquette. 



The librarian's report for the Peter WHte public library for the fiscal 
year ending February 28, showed the total circulation to be 37,567, or an 
increase of 9,441 over the circulation of the previous year. The average 
monthly circulation was 3,130 and the average daily circulation was 122 
plus. During the year 508 new cards were issued giving a total registra- 
tion of 5,723; 1,008 volumes were added during the year making a total 
of 17,455. Since November IS, the reading room has been open to adult« 
on Sundays from 2 to 6 p. m. ; since then 806 people in all have taken ad- 
vantage of this privilege. The weekly story hour has increased the circula- 
tion of juvenile books during the two months that it has been a feature. 

Marshall. 

The Ladies' Librar>' Association had thought it udvisable to close the doors 
of the library for a time owing to indifference and the small number of sub- 
scribers. However two public spirited citizens, W. J, Dibble and F. A. 
Stuart, have devised a plan by which it will be maintained as a free library 
and kept open as many days a week as possible. 

Painsdale. 

A branch of the Painsdale public library was opened at the Baltic mine 
office October 24. Over 100 volumps were sent, some of them in the Finnish 
language. The quarters at the mine ofRce are commodious and attractively 
furnished. 

Petoskey. 

Regarding a site for the proposed Carnegie library in Petoskey, the follow- 
ing announcement was made: "Mrs. Annie Kirkland offers as a site for the 
Carnegie library, a piece of ground 75 feet square at the comer of Devision 
and Lake streets, just east of the city hall for S4,000. Of this amount Mrs. 
Kirkland will give S500 and the Ladies' library association will donate S500." 

The will of the late W. W. Johnson pves $10,000 to the public library. 

S.\Q1NAW. 

Samual N. Hoyt presented »20,000 to the Hoyt library. This Hbran,- 
waa established by the will of the late Jesse Hoyt and was intended for a 
purely reference library, but lack of funds with which to add to the original 
collection from time to time, impaired its value. 

St. Joseph. 

Miss Florence was appointed librarian to succeed Miss Fyfe whose resigna- 
tion takes place in Januarj-. 



Property owners will be given an opportunity at the spring election to 
decide whether the city shall contribute to the Ladie.s' Libran.- Association 
for the ensuing year. 



i.;>L.OOglC 



REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORTS OF LIBRARY ORGANIZERS. 

Olive E. Davis, Organizer. 

Belding. 

The Belding school librarv', coneisting of 513 books, is located in the 
superinteodeDt's ofSce in the high school building at Belding. The organiz- 
ing, which began January 4th, 1908, and was completed the 2l8t of the same 
month, was done at the solicitation of Mr. E. N. Pitkin, superintendent of 
the schools, who, with the librarian Miss Guenn Stebbins, cooperated heartily 
in the actual work. This school library is the nearest approach to a public 
library that Belding has, and a desire to make the small collection of books 
as useful as possible, not only to the students but to all the readers of the 
township as well, led to the organizing of the library. 

Birmingham. 

The Birmingham public library, containing 2,400 books, the gift of the 
Birmingham Library Association, wa.s organized at the outset of its public 
career. The work was begim August I7th and finished November 14th, 
The work progressed steadily except for the suspension, from October 14th 
to October 28th, when the non-fiction at the Holly library was cataloged, 
Daisy M. Durkee the librarian gave considerable extra time in the actual 
work in order to learn the new routine an<l Miss Martha Baldwin, President 
of the Board, and the steadfast friend of the library since its inception 37 
years ago, helped in inimmerable ways. The mechanical work of putting 
on labels was done largely by the women of the village. When the organiza- 
tion of the library was completed, a short talk was given to the high school 
and upper grammar grade students explaining the plan of the work. The 
completion of the installation of librarj- methods was somewhat delayed 
owing to the fact that the library was opened the regular hours during the 
organization. That as many as 45 books eirculateil in one day was gratifying 
to those ladies of the Birmingham librar\- association who had worked long 
and hard for the library. 

The growth of this collection of books has been regulated by the demand 
of the members of the association which was almost entirely for fiction. 
History and biography, however, are quite well represented, and such sets 
as the American Statesmen series. American Men of Letters series, and 
English Men of Letters series, are almost complete. 

HOLLV. 

The organization at the Birmingham public librarj' was suspended from 
October 14th to October 28th, 1907, during which time the non-fiction 
collection of books (430) in the Holly library were cataloged. The women 
of the Board helped greatly in the mechanical preparation of the books by 
taking off the old and putting on new labels. On a return trip several 
weeks later, the libran- was found to have been thoroughly renovated and 
the work of cataloging the fiction was to go forward under the capable direc- 
tion of Miss Edna Haas. Di3rizii(j.;> CiOOQlC 



REPORT OF COUNTY ORGANIZER. 16 

HeI,EN J, MlLLSPACGH, ORGANIZER. 

Blissfield District Library. 
The library is located in the schoolhouse and contains about 803 volumes. 
This was accessioned, classified, shelf-listed and cataloged. 

Macon District Library. 
Library of 150 volumes, books classified and cataloged. 

Manchester Public School Library. 
Library of 650 volumes, accessioned, claseilied and cataloged. 
Roth M. Whioht, Organizer. 

Gaylord Union Library. 

By special act of the legislature the libraries of Bagley and Livingston 
townships have been combined to form the Union Librarj- in Gaylord, three 
board members being elected from each township. A large, wel! lighted 
room in the bank building was given for the use of the library and standard 
library supplies were ordered. The total number of books, including 
children's books, was 1,750 volumes, of which a large percentage was fiction. 
The library was thoroughly examined and much weeding out was necessary. 
The books were classified and cataloged, and a simplified Newark charging 
system installed. 

During May an assistant from the State Library went through Oakland 
county and visited the libraries at Farmington, Birmingham, Pontiac, 
Royal Oak and Holly. Requests for help in organizing had been received 
from three of these libraries, and statistics were compiled which would be 
of service and guidance to the organizer in ordering library supplies and 
equipment, and in estimating the time needed for organization. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF R. D. BAILEY, COUNTY ORGANIZER. 

Teachers' Association at Cheboygan. 
My work for the State Board of Library Commissioners began in April, 
1907, with a request to attend a Teachers' Association at Cheboygan. The 
library was displayed to the best advantage; the library extension policy 
of the Board of Library Commissioners was carefully explained, and teach- 
ers urged to equip their schools with libraries, both by purchase and by loana 
from the State Librarj'. 

Preliminary Arrangements for the State Teachers' Association. 
t" Trips were made during the spring and earlj' summer to various parts 
of the lower peninsula, for the purpose of making arrangments for the pre- 
sentation of library topics in the general session and in the various sections 
of this great annual meeting. 

D,3nz.<J.;>L.OOt^lC 



16 REPORT OF BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

The plan was to do enough library work at this meeting to make a clear, 
lasting impression; to so concentrate effort on the one topic in all sections, 
whether primary or college, commissioners' or grammar school, and that 
by people of note- and ability, that all in att«ndance should cany away 
the correct impression that the library is the right hand of the public school 
system. I believe that we succeeded in this. The percentage of library 
topics on the whole program is gratifying and' as large as it should have been. 

Michigan Library AaaociATiOM in DETRorr. 
In June I was one of the representatives of the Board at the meeting 
of the Michigan Library Association in Detroit, As the pa[>ers and addresses 
given there will be either printed or commented on in a report of the pro- 
ceedings, issued under the auspices of the State Board of- Library Commis- 
sioners, I will only say they were more uniformly helpful than those of al- 
most any association that one can attend. 

Special Meeting of Commissioners of Schools. 

In the spring I attended a special meeting of the Commissioners-elect 
called by the Superintendent of Public Instruction to iqeet in Lansing. 
All that seemed necessary was to form personal acquaintance with new com- 
missioners, occupy a few moments on the program with a reminder of what 
can be done in each county with the commissioner's help. Some printed 
matter, also, was given out. The attitude of the commissioners greatly 
affects the library sentiment throughout the county. 

Crawford and Roscommon Counties. 

A few days were spent in these counties, in placing gift libraries, explaining 
the traveling library system, and in conference with people competent to 
give good lists of names. At a recent meeting in Grayling, several spoke 
from experience with gratitude and enthusiasm of both classes of libraries. 

School of Library Methods .\t M.\RQUETrE Normal. 

The month of July was spent in assisting in the summer school of library 
methods in Marquette Normal. Here was an ample and almost unworked 
field. The Normal faculty extended every courtesy, and afforded every 
opportunity for carrying on the work of acquainting the student body of 
teachers with the policy of library extension. I addressed the students at 
chapel, and exhibited a traveling library for young people in its case. 

I visited classes, assisted in displaying and explaining the working outfit 
used in the school of library methods. The attitude of many of the faculty 
became so favorable that many classes were excused that the students 
might attend the special sessions on reference books and on children's litera- 
ture given by Miss Grace Salisbury of Whitewater Normal, Wisconsin and 
Miss Ida Mendenhall, Geneseo Normal, N. Y. 

Gavlord. 

In August I assisted Miss Ruth M. Wright, of the State Librarj', jn organiz- 
ing the consolidated library of 1,750 volumes at Gaylord. 

D,3nz.<J.;>L.OO'^lC 



REPORT OF COUNTY ORGANIZER. 



State Fair. 



I assisted with the exhibit of the State Library in the Michigan Building 
at the State Fair, A more appropriate location than the one secured could 
not have been found on the grounds. All visitors to the Michigan Building 
had naturally to pass it. Many thousands from all parts of our State must 
have carried away a pleasant mental picture of the alcove fitted out with 
traveling libraries, graded and reference libraries, and choice reproductions 
of the world's masterpieces of painting from the loan collection of the State 
Library. All day long, during the fair, hundreds heard the explanation of 
the generosity of the State in loaning books and pictures so freely. 

State Teachers' Association at Battle Creek. 

A week was occupied with this meeting. No little progress must have 
been made in arousing the educators of our State on the subject of the de- 
veloped library. 

Upper Peninsula Teachers' Association, 

The week following the Battle Creek meeting I attended the Upper Penin- 
sula Teachers' Association at Escanaba. I feel that library interests were 
much advanced through the seven places on the program given. Most of 
the arrangements had been made by correspondence, I think this would 
have been impossible had it not been for the acquaintances formed during 
my stay at the Marquette summer school. 

The school officers' section was devoted entirely to a library symposium 
by several leading educators from the Upper Peninsula. There was a general 
feeling of satisfaction over the program, and a keen regret expressed that 
the able efforts of that section had not been given before the large general 
session. Library interests were left in the best possible condition by the 
Escanaba meeting. 

Many of the leaders in the Upper Peninsula lose no opportunity to speak 
good words for the policy of library extension which your Board contemplates. 

Normal Farmers' Institute. 

In November I gave nearly a week in attending the Annual Michigan 
Normal Farmers' Institute, at the Agricultural College, for the purpose 
of cominginto better relations with the thirty able agriculturalists who gathered 
there for a final conference before starting out on the three months tour of 
the State in farmers' institute work. Tliese men and women go into the 
heart of each farming section of the State, and can and will do the library 
cause much good in their addresses as they talk as one farmer with another, 
I have since written each of these institute workers and will work with 
them before the season closes. 

St. Ignace. 

The day before Thanksgiving I attended the State Teachers' Institute 
at St. Ignace. The call to visit this place was the outgrowth of my at- 
tendance at the Kscanaba meeting. A good place on the program was given 
by Principal H. Kaye, of Marquette Normal, Conductor of the Institute. 
I have no doubt that some teachers were arouseii to the importance of library 
work. I secured and sent to the State Library names of all active teachers 

3 D.3nz.L.;>L.OOt^lC 



18 REPORT OP BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 

in attendance, with the request that application blanks for libraries be sent 



The two days following Thanksgiving I attended the Northern Michigan 
Teachers' Association at Cadillac. This annual meeting is an important 
feature in the educational life of the northern half of the Lower Peninsula. 

Farmers' Institutes. 

During December I worked in Farmers' Institutes at the following places: 
Ogemaw county, at West Branch; Crawford county, at Grayling; Mont- 
morency county, at Atlanta; Benzie county, at Beulah; Osceola county, 
at Reed City; Wexford county, at Manton; Emmet county, at Petoskey; 
Qieboygan county, at Wolverine, 

I attended these meetings by arrangement with Prof. L. R. Taft, of the 
Agricultural College. 

Besides speaking twice on the institute program, I exhibited a travel- 
ing library, interviewed the local editor, superintendent of schools, com- 
missioner, local librarians, officers of women's clubs and study clubs, 
inspected what libraries there are, and tried to set in motion better library 
influences. At each meeting I secured and forwarded to the State Library 
the names of those who voluntarily asked for application blanks. The 
registration of many existing Ubraries will be accomplished through these 
institutes, attendance at which I consider to be one of the most effectual 
means of reaching the rural population with libraries. 

During January, I am scheduled to work in the farmers' institutes in the 
following counties: Gladwin, Presque Isle, Alpena, Alcona, Iosco, Clinton, 
Gratiot, Isabella, Clare, Midland, Saginaw, 'Tuscola, Genesee, Lapeer, St. 
Clfur and Macomb. 

Gift Libraries. 

The policy of placing discarded traveling libraries as gift libraries where 
they will do the most good is to be commended. Opportunities are sought 
to place these libraries where they are needed. 

I have taken steps to come into more helpful relations with the following 
people: 

Superintendents and teachers, directors of fanners' institutes, commis- 
sioners of schools, officers of the various educational associations of the 
State, the editorial department of the Michigan Farmer, State Grange, 
State Association of Farmers' Clubs, editors, lecturer of State Grange, chur- 
man Library Committee of the State Federation of Women's Clubs, of 
local study clubs. 



i.y Google 



LIBRARY TRAINING IN NORMAL INSTITUTES. 



LIBRARY TRAINING IN NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Paper Read by Miss Ida Mendenuall Before the New York Librart 
Association. 

The library and school situation today is much as follows: The modem 
library has become the laboratory and supplement of the school course of 
study. Since librarianship has been developed within recent years and has 
become a science, uniform throughout the country, and so elaborate that 
one or two years of study are required to learn it, it is reasonable that people 
should be trained in the use of the library in its modem development. 
This training must be given in the public schools, where we have the people 
of t-he United States in process of making, and the teachers of the public 
schools hold the key to the situation. But the teachers have not yet been 
trained to the use of the library. They go out from the high school, college, 
or training school where no instruction is given in children's literature or 
the use of a library, and meet one of three conditions; either the teacher 
goes into a town having a public library, and she is not prepared to use it, 
or to lead children to the use of it ; or she goes into a school having a collection 
of books which she does not know how to care for, or make valuable in sup- 

Slementary school work; or she goes into a school having no library, and is 
elpless in selecting books suitable for the work and the children, and is 
St the mercy of the agent and worthless books. 

The three important topics which will be considered in this discussion oi 
the subject are — 

I. The need of library instruction in the normal schools. 
II. What normal schools are now doing in library instruction, 

III. Observations and conclusions as to what should constitute a normal 
course in library methods. 

First, The real solution of the problem lies in the introSuction of library 
ins